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TED Talk: "We think of our future as anticipated memories"

How do we measure happiness? What does it mean to be happy? How do we remember happiness? "It turns out the word happiness is just not a useful word anymore, because we apply it to many things," says Daniel Kahneman in a TED Talk about how we experience happiness, memory, and ourselves. (Or I should say our "selves," as Kahneman's talk suggests two distinct types of selves within each of us.) This is complex but fascinating stuff.

Discussed: ruining your memories, the experiencing self that lives in the present, the remembering self that maintains the story of your life, storytelling as a function of what we remember from our experiences, colonoscopies and pain reporting, how the end of an experience influences our memory of the overall event, how we think about time, how vacations serve the remembering self, how we weigh memories versus experiences, how someone can be satisfied with his life but that has little to do with how he's living his life day-to-day, "happiness is mainly...spending time with people we like," happiness is not a substitute for well-being, and how income below $60k affects happiness in America: "Money does not buy you experiential happiness, but lack of money certainly buys you misery."

You can also watch the talk in HD (MP4 video link).

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Belly Flop Physics 101: The Science Behind the Sting
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Belly flops are the least-dignified—yet most painful—way of making a serious splash at the pool. Rarely do they result in serious physical injury, but if you’re wondering why an elegant swan dive feels better for your body than falling stomach-first into the water, you can learn the laws of physics that turn your soft torso a tender pink by watching the SciShow’s video below.

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What's the Saltiest Water in the World?
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Saltwater is common around the world—indeed, salty oceans cover more than two-thirds of the globe. Typical saltwater found in our oceans is about 3.5% salt by weight. But in some areas, we find naturally occurring saltwater that's far saltier. The saltiest water yet discovered is more than 12 times saltier than typical seawater.

Gaet’ale is a pond in Ethiopia which currently holds the record as the most saline water body on Earth. The water in that pond is 43.3% dissolved solids by weight—most of that being salt. This kind of water is called hypersaline for its extreme salt concentration.

In the video below, Professor Martyn Poliakoff explains this natural phenomenon—why it's so salty, how the temperature of the pond affects its salinity, and even why this particular saltwater has a yellow tint. Enjoy:

For the paper Poliakoff describes, check out this abstract.

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