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Aurora Watch

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When someone sees you wear the Aurora Watch by designer Jihun Yeom, they'll think you're wearing a watchband that the actual timepiece has fallen out of. When they get a closer look, it's clear (pun intended) that you can tell time with it. It's a watch with no face! Yes, that is really a hole in the middle, but it's a hole that keeps time. The hands of the clock are lasers that shoot from the rim toward the center of the hole. The blue beam is the hour hand and the red beam is the minute hand.
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<rant>Of course, this configuration assumes that you can tell time by the angle of the hands only, which at one time was a given for the entire population. Three out of four of my kids (ages 11 to 16) have trouble telling time on an analog clock. I have dial clocks complete with numbers hanging on the walls. I won't buy a digital clock because I want them to learn to read an analog clock. But you cannot escape digital readouts. The kids will seek out the clock on the microwave, coffee maker, computer, or cell phone even when there is an analog clock right in front of them.</rant>

180AuroralaserThe Aurora Watch doesn't have lasers constantly shining. When you want the time, you just tap the edge and it activates. The rest of the time it's an optical illusion, or "jewelry" if you prefer. The Aurora Watch is, sadly, only a concept for now. But it's great concept that brings new life to the old joke "It's a hair past a freckle." To top this off, my youngest, who never wanted a dial watch, just looked over my shoulder and said this was "SO COOL!" I have to agree. But wait, I thought you couldn't tell time on a dial watch! "I can," she said, "I just don't want to. I would if I had a watch like that."
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Come to think of it, I haven't worn a wristwatch myself since I started carrying a phone. But this watch would change that.

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Spéciale
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Improve Your Chopping Skills With This Knife-Cutting Board Hybrid
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Spéciale

Chopping ingredients properly is an impressive skill, and for those who haven’t mastered it yet, this part of the cooking process can be a pain. Luckily, it is possible to do your slicing and dicing without the awkward hand positions and frequent slip-ups. All you need is a knife that stays attached to the board where you’re doing the cutting.

Spotted over at Mashable, spéciale is a high-quality walnut cutting board that comes with a 17-inch Damascus steel knife built in. Whether you’re breaking down fruits, vegetables, cheese, or charcuterie, the blade can rotate across the board as you cut while the tip stays fixed in place. This leaves one hand free, so you don’t have to pause to put down your glass of wine before the chopping starts.

The designers focused on aesthetics along with functionality, so when the board is not being used in the kitchen it doubles as a serving platter. And after you’ve had a chance to enjoy the fruit of your labors, you can pop the knife off the board for easy clean-up.

Spéciale recently wrapped up a campaign on Kickstarter where it raised more than $150,500, and prior to that it debuted on Indiegogo, where it raised nearly $170,000. The product is still available to order through the Indiegogo page for $195.

[h/t Mashable]

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Retro Games Limited
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The Commodore 64 Will Return as a Mini Console With Dozens of Games
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Retro Games Limited

Today’s video games may be more innovative than ever, but that doesn’t stop many from returning to the old-school games that remind them of their childhood. Following Nintendo’s massive success with the NES Classic in 2016 and the SNES Classic in September, the Commodore 64 is set to be the next vintage gaming device to get a miniature makeover. As Nerdist reports, Retro Games Limited will release a plug-and-play version of the 1982 bestseller in 2018.

The C64 Mini will be half the size of the original Commodore 64 computer and will feature 64 retro 8-bit titles, including Impossible Mission, Armalyte, Paradroid, and California Games. The kit will include a joystick, an HDMI cable for hooking up the console to your TV, and a USB power cable for charging it.

The console will have two USB ports that can be used to connect an extra joystick or plug in a full-sized keyboard to use the C64 Mini for simple coding. This could be especially useful when you get bored of the pre-loaded games and want to program a new one of your own from scratch.

The C64 Mini is set to retail for around $70 when it hits shelves in 2018, making it $10 cheaper than the newly-released SNES classic. Retro Games also plans to revive a full-sized version of the original Commodore 64 to sell in 2018. For an idea of what that might look like, check out this classic Commodore 64 how-to video from 1982.

[h/t Nerdist]

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