4 Earnest Instructional Videos

By my way of thinking, there's nothing funnier than earnest videos that capture a moment in history when we were a little more naïve. I ripped the following four clips from various longer, instructional vids that came out in the 70s and 80s. It took a bit of time, but I think if you give them a click, you'll find it was time well spent. Enjoy and feel free to share, please.

1. Slips, trips, and falls

Can someone please tell me why there's a woman typing 500wpm non-stop in the background as our lovely host tries to explain how to avoid tripping in the office environment?

2. Interesting eye care models

I would have liked to have been at the casting call for this series of scenes.

3. A mouse in the house

This is an instructional video that explains what a computer mouse is and how it works. This particular mouse was the first ever shipped with a personal computer, the Xerox 8010 Star Information System in 1981. (Yes, predating Apple by a couple years.)

4. The acrobat!

I'm not sure why this woman doesn't just keep her pens closer to her keyboard, or put the phone down before reaching for that file...

Follow me on Twitter to stay in the loop with all my @mental_floss content: @resila

nextArticle.image_alt|e
YouTube/Great Big Story
See the Secret Paintings Hidden in Gilded Books
YouTube/Great Big Story
YouTube/Great Big Story

The art of vanishing fore-edge painting—hiding delicate images on the front edges of gilded books—dates back to about 1660. Today, British artist Martin Frost is the last remaining commercial fore-edge painter in the world. He works primarily on antique books, crafting scenes from nature, domestic life, mythology, and Harry Potter. Great Big Story recently caught up with him in his studio to learn more about his disappearing art. Learn more in the video below.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Turn Studio
Mesmerizing Zoetrope Pottery
Turn Studio
Turn Studio
QVpQxlrf

Kenny Sing's handmade pottery is impossibly precise. He uses design software and paper stencils to cut sharp geometric patterns into his handmade pots. But it's when the pots start spinning that they turn into something truly unique. See more Turn Studio work on Instagram

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios