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4 Earnest Instructional Videos

By my way of thinking, there's nothing funnier than earnest videos that capture a moment in history when we were a little more naïve. I ripped the following four clips from various longer, instructional vids that came out in the 70s and 80s. It took a bit of time, but I think if you give them a click, you'll find it was time well spent. Enjoy and feel free to share, please.

1. Slips, trips, and falls

Can someone please tell me why there's a woman typing 500wpm non-stop in the background as our lovely host tries to explain how to avoid tripping in the office environment?

2. Interesting eye care models

I would have liked to have been at the casting call for this series of scenes.

3. A mouse in the house

This is an instructional video that explains what a computer mouse is and how it works. This particular mouse was the first ever shipped with a personal computer, the Xerox 8010 Star Information System in 1981. (Yes, predating Apple by a couple years.)

4. The acrobat!

I'm not sure why this woman doesn't just keep her pens closer to her keyboard, or put the phone down before reaching for that file...

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Unboxing Dr. Seuss Toys (and Facts)!
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Dr. Seuss said if he were invited to a dinner party with his characters, "I wouldn't show up."

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Why a Howling Wind Sounds So Spooky, According to Science
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Halloween is swiftly approaching, meaning you'll likely soon hear creepy soundtracks—replete with screams, clanking chains, and howling winds—blaring from haunted houses and home displays. While the sound of human suffering is frightful for obvious reasons, what is it, exactly, about a brisk fall gust that sends shivers up our spines? In horror movie scenes and ghost stories, these spooky gales are always presented as blowing through dead trees. Do bare branches actually make the natural wailing noises louder, or is this detail added simply for atmospheric purposes?

As the SciShow's Hank Green explains in the video below, wind howls because it curves around obstacles like trees or buildings. When fast-moving air goes around, say, a tree, it splits up as it whips past, before coming back together on the other side. Due to factors such as natural randomness, air speed, and the tree's surface, one side's wind is going to be slightly stronger when the two currents rejoin, pushing the other side's gust out of the way. The two continue to interact back-and-forth in what could be likened to an invisible wrestling match, as high-pressure airwaves and whirlpools mix together and vibrate the air. If the wind is fast enough, this phenomenon will produce the eerie noise we've all come to recognize in horror films.

Leafy trees "will absorb some of the vibrations in the air and dull the sound, but without leaves—like if it's the middle of the winter or the entire forest is dead—the howling will travel a lot farther," Green explains. That's why a dead forest on a windy night sounds so much like the undead.

Learn more by watching SciShow's video below.

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