Morning Cup of Links: Dentistry Circus

Missile Silo Confessions: Living on the Edge of Armageddon. Lots of photographs and reminiscing from the people who built, manned, and recovered a Titan missile site.
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For the video We Love xkcd, an (almost) all-star cast from the Blogosphere recreates this comic that parodies this ad.
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Michael R. Barrick created a graphic last summer using the Vancouver Olympics mascots and the internet cartoon known as Pedobear. It was only a matter of time before someone used it without knowing that Pedobear is not an Olympic mascot.
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6 Shockingly Evil Things Babies Are Capable Of. Of course, babies wouldn't consider them evil, just the result of natural selection that made their existence possible.
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Edgar Parker opened his dental practice in 1892 and found business was not that great. So he took his practice on the road and became "the P.T. Barnum of dentistry."
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Is there an Academy Award for weather forecasts? This guy must be trying for one, the way he's hamming it up.
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7 Carnivals Around the World. These events will have different dates, but they'll be celebrated again this (and every) year.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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