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That's Not Art

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Want to have a laugh? Then please get yourself over to Garrett Murray's That's Not Art, a scathing indictment of angsty pseudo-art posted on Tumblr blogs (I refuse to say "Tumblogs" as that's a pseudo-word). Yes, we're laughing AT these people, but come on, this is ridiculous:

Murray's commentary:

You are in love with a ghost? How did you meet? I've been trying to meet someone new for a while now, but these speed dating events are total crap. Every one of the women I've talked to seems to find me repulsive. A ghost, though, might be really into me.

I used to tell my wife she was so good at not paying attention that most times it seemed like she wasn't even in the room. I'm thinking this is pretty much exactly how dating a ghost would feel. Except the ghost wouldn't randomly jump back into the conversation to bitch and moan about how you refuse to take the recycling out.

A few more favorites after the jump.

I love love

This just seems pointless on every level, not to mention the insanely low quality of the image used. "I love love" is about as useful as writing, "I enjoy enjoyment" or "Fun is fun." Nice handwriting, too. Perhaps instead of wasting time loving love, you should start trying to love penmanship.

The trick is to keep breathing

Actually, of all the things about being a human, this is the one thing you never have to worry about. Your brain is amazingly adept at keeping you breathing, even after being stabbed, shot, or smashed to the head. It also keeps you breathing through long, boring office meetings, that romantic comedy your wife forced you to go to even though you would have rather seen District 9 and why does she always get to pick the movie anyway? I'm so tired of all these stupid Hugh Grant movies when we could be watching G.I. Joe or at least football or something. And don't get me started on how annoying it is when her sister visits.

So yeah, if you're feeling sarcastic today, here's a whole bunch more.

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Courtesy Chronicle Books
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Design
Inside This Pop-Up Book Are a Planetarium, a Speaker, a Decoder Ring, and More
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Courtesy Chronicle Books

Designer Kelli Anderson's new book is for more than just reading. This Book Is a Planetarium is really a collection of paper gadgets. With each thick, card stock page you turn, another surprise pops out.

"This book concisely explains—and actively demonstrates with six functional pop-up paper contraptions—the science at play in our everyday world," the book's back cover explains. It turns out, there's a whole lot you can do with a few pieces of paper and a little bit of imagination.

A book is open to reveal a spiralgraph inside.
Courtesy Chronicle Books

There's the eponymous planetarium, a paper dome that you can use with your cell phone's flashlight to project constellations onto the ceiling. There's a conical speaker, which you can use to amplify a smaller music player. There's a spiralgraph you can use to make geometric designs. There's a basic cipher you can use to encode and decode secret messages, and on its reverse side, a calendar. There's a stringed musical instrument you can play on. All are miniature, functional machines that can expand your perceptions of what a simple piece of paper can become.

The cover of This Book Is a Planetarium
Courtesy Chronicle Books
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Noriyuki Saitoh
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Art
Japanese Artist Crafts Intricate Insects Using Bamboo
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Noriyuki Saitoh

Not everyone finds insects beautiful. Some people think of them as scary, disturbing, or downright disgusting. But when Japanese artist Noriyuki Saitoh looks at a discarded cicada shell or a feeding praying mantis, he sees inspiration for his next creation.

Saitoh’s sculptures, spotted over at Colossal, are crafted by hand from bamboo. He uses the natural material to make some incredibly lifelike pieces. In one example, three wasps perch on a piece of honeycomb. In another, two mating dragonflies create a heart shape with their abdomens.

The figures he creates aren’t meant to be exact replicas of real insects. Rather, Saitoh starts his process with a list of dimensions and allows room for creativity when fine-tuning the appearances. The sense of movement and level of detail he puts into each sculpture is what makes them look so convincing.

You can browse the artist’s work on his website or follow him on social media for more stunning samples from his portfolio.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

[h/t Colossal]

All images courtesy of Noriyuki Saitoh.

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