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Mike White

Vacation to Mars: Antarctica's Dry Valleys

Original image
Mike White

Most of Antarctica has about 2 1/2 miles of ice covering it, and that cold, white wasteland is what most people picture when they think of our south pole. But as I discovered when I posted about its mysterious Blood Falls, there is a series of dry valleys in Antarctica, about 4,000 kilometers square, that have no ice on them at all. The world's harshest desert, the moisture is sucked from the dry valleys by a rain shadow effect -- winds rushing over them at speeds up to 200/mph -- that leave this bizarre and fascinating landscape, much closer to that of Mars than the rest of our planet, open to exploration.

Lacking the resources (or cojones) to go there myself, these photos are by scientists and researchers who've been there, and are included as part of galleries on the McMurdo Dry Valleys Management Area website.

The Valleys have been carved out by glaciers that have retreated, exposing valley floors and walls that typically have a top layer of boulders, gravel and pebbles, which are weathered and wind-sorted. Lower layers are largely cemented together by ice. Unusual surface deposits include marine sediments, ash, and sand dunes like this one:

sand - chris kannen
Photo by Chris Kannen

Another thing you wouldn't expect to find in the coldest place on Earth? Running water. In the summer, bodies of water unfreeze enough to make water flow, like the continent's largest and longest river, the Onyx, which is fed exclusively by glacial melt. This little stream is frozen, but you get the picture:

stream - sean fitzsimmons
Photo by Sean Fitzimmons

However, there are some bodies of water in the dry valleys -- mostly small, hypersaline ponds -- that never freeze. Imagine how strange it would be to find, in weather 100 degrees below zero (and in the depths of a months-long night) this little patch of salty liquid, known as Don Juan Pond:

don juan pond - malcom mcleod
Photo by Malcom McLeod

It looks so dry and calm in most of these pictures, it's hard to comprehend just how arid and cold it really gets there. Here are a few pictures that might help -- a dead seal, frozen solid and mummified, absolutely dehydrated.
mummified seal - chris kannen
Photo by Chris Kannen

And some very cold-looking rocks!
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Photo by Andris Apse

Then there are places that look like they might as well be on the moon, like these pillars of dolerite in the Kennar Valley. (They remind me of the tufa rock formations in California.)
pillars of dolerite - gretchen williams
Photo by Gretchen Williams

Below is a volcanic "labyrinth," a very special formation of basalt, which geologist Edmond Mathez describes this way:

The dikes and sills of the Dry Valleys are the remnants of a kind of plumbing system through which magma worked its way to the surface in a series of eruptions about 180 million years ago. Volcanic plumbing systems are rarely exposed at the surface. The reason is simply that around active volcanoes, lava covers everything. Exposed to view in various parts of the Dry Valleys, however, is a vertical slice of the dikes and sills immediately beneath the lavas, which cuts across layers of rock two and a half miles thick. Hence along the valley walls, geologists can see much deeper into the volcanic plumbing than they can almost anywhere else.

labyrinth - peter rejcek
Photo by Peter Rejcek

It's not just scientists that visit the dry valleys, though. Small groups of tourists are allowed to helicopter in from the Ross Sea, to a specially designated area near the Canada glacier -- so if you're loaded and ready to freeze your buns off, that sounds like fun. There's also this guy, a painter named Nigel Brown, who won a fellowship to come and paint in the valleys. Look, he made a weird painting of Blood Falls:

blood falls painter - tim higham
Photo by Tim Higham

If you've ever dreamed about visiting an alien world, this is probably as close as any of us will be able to get.

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photography
This Is What Flowers Look Like When Photographed With an X-Ray Machine
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Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Peruvian Daffodil” (1938)

Many plant photographers choose to showcase the vibrant colors and physical details of exotic flora. For his work with flowers, Dr. Dain L. Tasker took a more bare-bones approach. The radiologist’s ghostly floral images were recorded using only an X-ray machine, according to Hyperallergic.

Tasker snapped his pictures of botanical life while he was working at Los Angeles’s Wilshire Hospital in the 1930s. He had minimal experience photographing landscapes and portraits in his spare time, but it wasn’t until he saw an X-ray of an amaryllis, taken by a colleague, that he felt inspired to swap his camera for the medical tool. He took black-and-white radiographs of everything from roses and daffodils to eucalypti and holly berries. The otherworldly artwork was featured in magazines and art shows during Tasker’s lifetime.

Selections from Tasker's body of work have been seen around the world, including as part of the Floral Studies exhibition at the Joseph Bellows Gallery in San Diego in 2016. Prints of his work are also available for purchase from the Stinehour Wemyss Editions and Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)

X-ray image of a rose.
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “A Rose” (1936)

All images courtesy of Joseph Bellows Gallery.

Original image
Jan Campbell, @avocadostonefaces
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Design
This Artist Carves Avocado Pits Into Lifelike Figurines
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Jan Campbell, @avocadostonefaces

The pit of an avocado is a source of annoyance (and even a source of harm) for some consumers. But Irish artist Jan Campbell looks to the fruit’s inedible center for inspiration. According to Bored Panda, she carves avocado pits, that would otherwise get discarded, into whimsical characters based on Celtic mythology.

Campbell’s Avocado Stone Faces project was inspired by a meal she made in 2014. After eating an avocado, she felt compelled to hold onto the pit that was left behind. “It dawned on me that I was holding a substantial object in my hand, one with a lot of potential,” she wrote on her website. “It felt like a shame to just throw it into the compost.” A couple weeks later, she returned to that same pit and carved it into her first 3D character.

Since that first attempt, Campbell has recycled avocado stones into bearded figurines, miniature mushrooms, and playful pendants. She shares pictures of her creations on her Instagram page and sells select items on her website. Take a look at some of her most intricate carvings below.

Hand holding a wooden talisman.

Wooden carving of a woman standing on a table.

Wooden carvings of mushrooms laid out on a table.

Wooden carvings of men on a table.

Hand holding a wooden carving of a face.

Carved figurines sitting on a table.

Hand holding carved faces.

[h/t Bored Panda]

All images courtesy of Jan Campbell, @avocadostonefaces

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