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How Did Cameron Get an Indoor Stadium? The Names Behind 12 College Arenas

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Now that college basketball season is in full swing, hoops fans are hearing a lot about teams' home arenas during broadcasts. While it's easy to figure out the origins of many of these namesake arenas—basketball fans surely know where Rupp Arena and the Dean Smith Center got their names—some aren't as clear. Who was Cameron, and how did he get an indoor stadium? Let's take a look at the names behind college hoops' best-known venues.

1. Cameron Indoor Stadium

The Duke Blue Devils' major home-court advantage gets its name from Eddie Cameron, who was a monumental figure in Duke athletics. Not only did Cameron coach the school's basketball team from 1929 to 1949, he also coached the football team from 1942 to 1945, when he won the Sugar Bowl. In 1972, the university renamed Duke Indoor Stadium after Cameron.

2. Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum

l-joelDuke's cross-state rival Wake Forest plays in an arena named after a Medal-of-Honor-winning Army medic. In late 1965, Joel was on a patrol in Vietnam when his battalion fell victim to a Viet Cong ambush. The attack killed or wounded nearly every soldier in Joel's vicinity, and despite orders to stay on the ground, he began attending to the wounded. Even when Joel was shot twice, he kept treating other injured soldiers after bandaging his wounds and making himself a makeshift crutch. He died in 1984, and Winston-Salem's Board of Aldermen named the city's new arena after Joel in 1986.

3. Allen Fieldhouse

The Kansas Jayhawks' digs take their name from one of the school's most legendary coaches. Dr. Forrest C. "Phog" Allen led the team for 39 years, where he picked up three national titles while coaching future greats like Adolph Rupp and Dean Smith. Allen also helped turn basketball into an Olympic sport and coached the American team to gold in the 1952 Games.

4. The Carrier Dome

carrier-dome

Syracuse's giant football and basketball stadium gets its name from heating and cooling leader the Carrier Corporation, which plunked down a $2.75 million naming gift to help with construction during the late 1970s.

5. Gampel Pavilion

The Connecticut Huskies' formidable men's and women's squads play in an arena named after Harry A. Gampel, a 1943 UConn grad, steel magnate, land developer, and philanthropist. He donated $1 million to help finance the arena.

6. The Stephen C. O'Connell Center

The Florida Gators' home takes its name from the former Florida Supreme Court justice who became the university's sixth president in 1967, a position he held until 1973.

7. The Frank Erwin Center

The University of Texas Longhorns' drum-shaped home used to be called the Special Events Center, but in 1980 the school changed the arena's name to honor Frank Erwin, a former university regent who helped build new facilities on campus.

8. Pauley Pavilion

UCLA

The UCLA Bruins' home is named after Edwin W. Pauley, a 20th-century oil baron and University of California Regent. In addition to his oil businesses, Pauley dabbled in politics. President Truman made him the American representative to the Allied Reparations Committee after World War II and unsuccessfully nominated Pauley for the post of Undersecretary of the Navy.

9. Crisler Arena

The home of the Michigan Wolverines takes its name from Fritz Crisler, who coached the Wolverines' football team from 1938 to 1947. His coaching career culminated with an undefeated 1947 season in which Michigan thrashed USC 49-0 in the Rose Bowl, and Crisler then became the school's athletic director.

Crisler's given name wasn't Fritz; he was born Herbert Orin Crisler. Fritz was a nickname given to him by legendary football coach Amos Alonzo Stagg when Crisler was a player at the University of Chicago. The joke was that Crisler's last name sounded like that of Austrian violin virtuoso Fritz Kreisler. Football may have been just a tad more intellectual in those days.

10. Williams Arena

The University of Minnesota's hoops home is also named after a football coach. Henry L. Williams got his coaching start at Army in 1891, but he became famous for his 1900-1921 stint at Minnesota. He has a number of football innovations to his credit, including being possibly the first coach to advocate the legalization of the forward pass and innovating the four-man defensive backfield.

11. Jon M. Huntsman Arena

When you're both the 47th-richest man alive and extremely generous, you're going to get quite a few buildings named after you. Huntsman, the billionaire philanthropist founder of Huntsman Chemical, has his name on the University of Utah's 15,000-seat home arena, but it doesn't stop there. The main building of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School and the business school at Utah State University are both named after Huntsman as well. He might have his name on the law library at Brigham Young and the library at Southern Utah University, too, but Huntsman requested those buildings be named after other people.

12. John Paul Jones Arena

The University of Virginia's home arena isn't named after the American naval hero of the same name, and it's not named after Led Zeppelin's bassist, either. Instead, the arena takes its name from the father of billionaire investor Paul Tudor Jones II. The Virginia grad donated $35 million to finance the arena's construction and named it after his father.

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iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva
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Man Buys Two Metric Tons of LEGO Bricks; Sorts Them Via Machine Learning
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iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva

Jacques Mattheij made a small, but awesome, mistake. He went on eBay one evening and bid on a bunch of bulk LEGO brick auctions, then went to sleep. Upon waking, he discovered that he was the high bidder on many, and was now the proud owner of two tons of LEGO bricks. (This is about 4400 pounds.) He wrote, "[L]esson 1: if you win almost all bids you are bidding too high."

Mattheij had noticed that bulk, unsorted bricks sell for something like €10/kilogram, whereas sets are roughly €40/kg and rare parts go for up to €100/kg. Much of the value of the bricks is in their sorting. If he could reduce the entropy of these bins of unsorted bricks, he could make a tidy profit. While many people do this work by hand, the problem is enormous—just the kind of challenge for a computer. Mattheij writes:

There are 38000+ shapes and there are 100+ possible shades of color (you can roughly tell how old someone is by asking them what lego colors they remember from their youth).

In the following months, Mattheij built a proof-of-concept sorting system using, of course, LEGO. He broke the problem down into a series of sub-problems (including "feeding LEGO reliably from a hopper is surprisingly hard," one of those facts of nature that will stymie even the best system design). After tinkering with the prototype at length, he expanded the system to a surprisingly complex system of conveyer belts (powered by a home treadmill), various pieces of cabinetry, and "copious quantities of crazy glue."

Here's a video showing the current system running at low speed:

The key part of the system was running the bricks past a camera paired with a computer running a neural net-based image classifier. That allows the computer (when sufficiently trained on brick images) to recognize bricks and thus categorize them by color, shape, or other parameters. Remember that as bricks pass by, they can be in any orientation, can be dirty, can even be stuck to other pieces. So having a flexible software system is key to recognizing—in a fraction of a second—what a given brick is, in order to sort it out. When a match is found, a jet of compressed air pops the piece off the conveyer belt and into a waiting bin.

After much experimentation, Mattheij rewrote the software (several times in fact) to accomplish a variety of basic tasks. At its core, the system takes images from a webcam and feeds them to a neural network to do the classification. Of course, the neural net needs to be "trained" by showing it lots of images, and telling it what those images represent. Mattheij's breakthrough was allowing the machine to effectively train itself, with guidance: Running pieces through allows the system to take its own photos, make a guess, and build on that guess. As long as Mattheij corrects the incorrect guesses, he ends up with a decent (and self-reinforcing) corpus of training data. As the machine continues running, it can rack up more training, allowing it to recognize a broad variety of pieces on the fly.

Here's another video, focusing on how the pieces move on conveyer belts (running at slow speed so puny humans can follow). You can also see the air jets in action:

In an email interview, Mattheij told Mental Floss that the system currently sorts LEGO bricks into more than 50 categories. It can also be run in a color-sorting mode to bin the parts across 12 color groups. (Thus at present you'd likely do a two-pass sort on the bricks: once for shape, then a separate pass for color.) He continues to refine the system, with a focus on making its recognition abilities faster. At some point down the line, he plans to make the software portion open source. You're on your own as far as building conveyer belts, bins, and so forth.

Check out Mattheij's writeup in two parts for more information. It starts with an overview of the story, followed up with a deep dive on the software. He's also tweeting about the project (among other things). And if you look around a bit, you'll find bulk LEGO brick auctions online—it's definitely a thing!

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Here's How to Change Your Name on Facebook
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iStock

Whether you want to change your legal name, adopt a new nickname, or simply reinvent your online persona, it's helpful to know the process of resetting your name on Facebook. The social media site isn't a fan of fake accounts, and as a result changing your name is a little more complicated than updating your profile picture or relationship status. Luckily, Daily Dot laid out the steps.

Start by going to the blue bar at the top of the page in desktop view and clicking the down arrow to the far right. From here, go to Settings. This should take you to the General Account Settings page. Find your name as it appears on your profile and click the Edit link to the right of it. Now, you can input your preferred first and last name, and if you’d like, your middle name.

The steps are similar in Facebook mobile. To find Settings, tap the More option in the bottom right corner. Go to Account Settings, then General, then hit your name to change it.

Whatever you type should adhere to Facebook's guidelines, which prohibit symbols, numbers, unusual capitalization, and honorifics like Mr., Ms., and Dr. Before landing on a name, make sure you’re ready to commit to it: Facebook won’t let you update it again for 60 days. If you aren’t happy with these restrictions, adding a secondary name or a name pronunciation might better suit your needs. You can do this by going to the Details About You heading under the About page of your profile.

[h/t Daily Dot]

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