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How Did Cameron Get an Indoor Stadium? The Names Behind 12 College Arenas

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Now that college basketball season is in full swing, hoops fans are hearing a lot about teams' home arenas during broadcasts. While it's easy to figure out the origins of many of these namesake arenas—basketball fans surely know where Rupp Arena and the Dean Smith Center got their names—some aren't as clear. Who was Cameron, and how did he get an indoor stadium? Let's take a look at the names behind college hoops' best-known venues.

1. Cameron Indoor Stadium

The Duke Blue Devils' major home-court advantage gets its name from Eddie Cameron, who was a monumental figure in Duke athletics. Not only did Cameron coach the school's basketball team from 1929 to 1949, he also coached the football team from 1942 to 1945, when he won the Sugar Bowl. In 1972, the university renamed Duke Indoor Stadium after Cameron.

2. Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum

l-joelDuke's cross-state rival Wake Forest plays in an arena named after a Medal-of-Honor-winning Army medic. In late 1965, Joel was on a patrol in Vietnam when his battalion fell victim to a Viet Cong ambush. The attack killed or wounded nearly every soldier in Joel's vicinity, and despite orders to stay on the ground, he began attending to the wounded. Even when Joel was shot twice, he kept treating other injured soldiers after bandaging his wounds and making himself a makeshift crutch. He died in 1984, and Winston-Salem's Board of Aldermen named the city's new arena after Joel in 1986.

3. Allen Fieldhouse

The Kansas Jayhawks' digs take their name from one of the school's most legendary coaches. Dr. Forrest C. "Phog" Allen led the team for 39 years, where he picked up three national titles while coaching future greats like Adolph Rupp and Dean Smith. Allen also helped turn basketball into an Olympic sport and coached the American team to gold in the 1952 Games.

4. The Carrier Dome

carrier-dome

Syracuse's giant football and basketball stadium gets its name from heating and cooling leader the Carrier Corporation, which plunked down a $2.75 million naming gift to help with construction during the late 1970s.

5. Gampel Pavilion

The Connecticut Huskies' formidable men's and women's squads play in an arena named after Harry A. Gampel, a 1943 UConn grad, steel magnate, land developer, and philanthropist. He donated $1 million to help finance the arena.

6. The Stephen C. O'Connell Center

The Florida Gators' home takes its name from the former Florida Supreme Court justice who became the university's sixth president in 1967, a position he held until 1973.

7. The Frank Erwin Center

The University of Texas Longhorns' drum-shaped home used to be called the Special Events Center, but in 1980 the school changed the arena's name to honor Frank Erwin, a former university regent who helped build new facilities on campus.

8. Pauley Pavilion

UCLA

The UCLA Bruins' home is named after Edwin W. Pauley, a 20th-century oil baron and University of California Regent. In addition to his oil businesses, Pauley dabbled in politics. President Truman made him the American representative to the Allied Reparations Committee after World War II and unsuccessfully nominated Pauley for the post of Undersecretary of the Navy.

9. Crisler Arena

The home of the Michigan Wolverines takes its name from Fritz Crisler, who coached the Wolverines' football team from 1938 to 1947. His coaching career culminated with an undefeated 1947 season in which Michigan thrashed USC 49-0 in the Rose Bowl, and Crisler then became the school's athletic director.

Crisler's given name wasn't Fritz; he was born Herbert Orin Crisler. Fritz was a nickname given to him by legendary football coach Amos Alonzo Stagg when Crisler was a player at the University of Chicago. The joke was that Crisler's last name sounded like that of Austrian violin virtuoso Fritz Kreisler. Football may have been just a tad more intellectual in those days.

10. Williams Arena

The University of Minnesota's hoops home is also named after a football coach. Henry L. Williams got his coaching start at Army in 1891, but he became famous for his 1900-1921 stint at Minnesota. He has a number of football innovations to his credit, including being possibly the first coach to advocate the legalization of the forward pass and innovating the four-man defensive backfield.

11. Jon M. Huntsman Arena

When you're both the 47th-richest man alive and extremely generous, you're going to get quite a few buildings named after you. Huntsman, the billionaire philanthropist founder of Huntsman Chemical, has his name on the University of Utah's 15,000-seat home arena, but it doesn't stop there. The main building of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School and the business school at Utah State University are both named after Huntsman as well. He might have his name on the law library at Brigham Young and the library at Southern Utah University, too, but Huntsman requested those buildings be named after other people.

12. John Paul Jones Arena

The University of Virginia's home arena isn't named after the American naval hero of the same name, and it's not named after Led Zeppelin's bassist, either. Instead, the arena takes its name from the father of billionaire investor Paul Tudor Jones II. The Virginia grad donated $35 million to finance the arena's construction and named it after his father.

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science
4 Expert Tips on How to Get the Most Out of August's Total Solar Eclipse
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Richard Bouhet // Getty

As you might have heard, there’s a total solar eclipse crossing the U.S. on August 21. It’s the first total solar eclipse in the country since 1979, and the first coast-to-coast event since June 8, 1918, when eclipse coverage pushed World War I off the front page of national newspapers. Americans are just as excited today: Thousands are hitting the road to stake out prime spots for watching the last cross-country total solar eclipse until 2045. We’ve asked experts for tips on getting the most out of this celestial spectacle.

1. DON’T FRY YOUR EYES—OR BREAK THE BANK

To see the partial phases of the eclipse, you will need eclipse glasses because—surprise!—staring directly at the sun for even a minute or two will permanently damage your retinas. Make sure the glasses you buy meet the ISO 12312-2 safety standards. As eclipse frenzy nears its peak, shady retailers are selling knock-off glasses that will not adequately protect your eyes. The American Astronomical Society keeps a list of reputable vendors, but as a rule, if you can see anything other than the sun through your glasses, they might be bogus. There’s no need to splurge, however: You can order safe paper specs in bulk for as little as 90 cents each. In a pinch, you and your friends can take turns watching the partial phases through a shared pair of glasses. As eclipse chaser and author Kate Russo points out, “you only need to view occasionally—no need to sit and stare with them on the whole time.”

2. DON’T DIY YOUR EYE PROTECTION

There are plenty of urban legends about “alternative” ways to protect your eyes while watching a solar eclipse: smoked glass, CDs, several pairs of sunglasses stacked on top of each other. None works. If you’re feeling crafty, or don’t have a pair of safe eclipse glasses, you can use a pinhole projector to indirectly watch the eclipse. NASA produced a how-to video to walk you through it.

3. GET TO THE PATH OF TOTALITY

Bryan Brewer, who published a guidebook for solar eclipses, tells Mental Floss the difference between seeing a partial solar eclipse and a total solar eclipse is “like the difference between standing right outside the arena and being inside watching the game.”

During totality, observers can take off their glasses and look up at the blocked-out sun—and around at their eerily twilit surroundings. Kate Russo’s advice: Don’t just stare at the sun. “You need to make sure you look above you, and around you as well so you can notice the changes that are happening,” she says. For a brief moment, stars will appear next to the sun and animals will begin their nighttime routines. Once you’ve taken in the scenery, you can use a telescope or a pair of binoculars to get a close look at the tendrils of flame that make up the sun’s corona.

Only a 70-mile-wide band of the country stretching from Oregon to South Carolina will experience the total eclipse. Rooms in the path of totality are reportedly going for as much as $1000 a night, and news outlets across the country have raised the specter of traffic armageddon. But if you can find a ride and a room, you'll be in good shape for witnessing the spectacle.

4. PRESERVE YOUR NIGHT VISION

Your eyes need half an hour to fully adjust to darkness, but the total eclipse will last less than three minutes. If you’ve just been staring at the sun through the partial phases of the eclipse, your view of the corona during totality will be obscured by lousy night vision and annoying green afterimages. Eclipse chaser James McClean—who has trekked from Svalbard to Java to watch the moon blot out the sun—made this rookie mistake during one of his early eclipse sightings in Egypt in 2006. After watching the partial phases, with stray beams of sunlight reflecting into his eyes from the glittering sand and sea, McClean was snowblind throughout the totality.

Now he swears by a new method: blindfolding himself throughout the first phases of the eclipse to maximize his experience of the totality. He says he doesn’t mind “skipping the previews if it means getting a better view of the film.” Afterward, he pops on some eye protection to see the partial phases of the eclipse as the moon pulls away from the sun. If you do blindfold yourself, just remember to set an alarm for the time when the total eclipse begins so you don’t miss its cross-country journey. You'll have to wait 28 years for your next chance.

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Pop Culture
IKEA Publishes Instructions for Turning Rugs Into Game of Thrones Capes
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HBO

Game of Thrones is one of the most expensive TV shows ever produced, but even the crew of the hit HBO series isn’t above using an humble IKEA hack behind the scenes. According to Mashable, the fur capes won by Jon Snow and other members of the Night’s Watch on the show are actually sheepskin rugs sold by the home goods chain.

The story behind the iconic garment was first revealed by head costume designer Michele Clapton at a presentation at Los Angeles’s Getty Museum in 2016. “[It’s] a bit of a trick,” she said at Designing the Middle Ages: The Costumes of GoT. “We take anything we can.”

Not one to dissuade customers from modifying its products, IKEA recently released a cape-making guide in the style of its visual furniture assembly instructions. To start you’ll need one of their Skold rugs, which can be bought online for $79. Using a pair of scissors cut a slit in the material and make a hole where your head will go. Slip it on and you’ll look ready for your Game of Thrones debut.

The costume team makes a few more changes to the rugs used on screen, like shaving them, adding leather straps, and waxing and “frosting” the fur to give it a weather-worn effect. Modern elements are used to make a variety of the medieval props used in Game of Thrones. The swords, for example, are made from aircraft aluminum, not steel. For more production design insights, check out these behind-the-scenes secrets of Game of Thrones weapons artists.

[h/t Mashable]

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