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18 Celebrity Workout Videos You Might Not Know Existed

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You already know Jane Fonda has a fitness empire, but there are a slew of other celebrity exercise videos lurking out there—some of which might surprise you. Give one a shot; at the very least, you'll be entertained while you work out.

1. ANGELA LANSBURY

Thanks to her roles as Mrs. Potts, Jessica Fletcher, and Auntie Mame, Angela Lansbury has Tony Awards, Golden Globes, a Grammy, and an honorary Academy Award under her belt. She's also got a workout video, released in 1988: Angela Lansbury’s Positive Moves: A Personal Plan for Fitness and Well-Being at Any Age.

2. MARK WAHLBERG

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Want abs like Mark Wahlberg? Well, as he points out in the video, you might not ever have them. But you can give it a shot with his 1993 video Form... Focus... Fitness.

3. ESTELLE GETTY

Estelle Getty made a workout video. What else do you need to know?

4. CHER

Want the confidence to wear Cher's "If I Could Turn Back Time" outfit? You can start with her workout videos. The singer and actress released her first video, CherFitness: A New Attitude, in 1991. It was a big hit, so in 1992, she released another one: CherFitness: Body Confidence.

5. REGIS PHILBIN

There's no doubt about it—for a guy in his mid-80s, Regis looks amazing. And he wants you to know how he did it! This 1993 gem is notable for its guest appearances alone (Kathie Lee and Gelman)!

6. ALYSSA MILANO

Capitalizing on her Who's the Boss fame, then-teen sensation Alyssa Milano filmed a 1988 workout video called Teen Steam. "It was during the time when they started to pull all funding out of schools for [physical education], so there was a need for it," the actress said in 2015. Milano also sang the theme song for the video.

7. DIXIE CARTER

Julia Sugarbaker can help you limber up with her Unworkout. Even if you're not into her brand of yoga (check out "The Lion"), you have to admit that any type of exercise is more charming when accompanied by a Southern accent.

8. MILTON BERLE

Uncle Miltie may have been one of the funniest comedians in Hollywood, but losing mobility and flexibility as you age is no laughing matter. That's why he released this 1994 video that combines humor (kind of) with a low-impact workout.

9. PAULA ABDUL

Following the success of her remix album Shut Up and Dance, Paula Abdul made her Get Up and Dance workout video in 1995—and it was popular enough to be re-released as a DVD in 2005.

10. LATOYA JACKSON

The early '90s were a goldmine for celebrity workout videos. Step Up Workout with LaToya Jackson was released in 1993—and the three people who have reviewed it on Amazon give it positively glowing reviews.

11. FABIO

You may never have Fabio's luscious locks, but if you follow along with his 1993 video, you could get his rippling muscles. OK, probably not.

12. HEATHER LOCKLEAR

The 1990 video Heather Locklear Presents Your Personal Workout was filmed after she found fame on T.J. Hooker and Dynasty, but before her turn as Amanda Woodward on Melrose Place. "I had never taken aerobics before and I was doing an aerobics video,” Locklear told Conan O'Brien in 2013. “They have a little earpiece in your ear, and they’re like, 'Alright two to the right, two to the left.'"

13. CELEBRITY PARENTS

Among Richard Simmons' impressive lineup of workout videos is a gem called Richard Simmons and the Silver Foxes, geared, obviously, at fitness for seniors. His guinea pigs? Celebrity parents. Among the illustrious moms and dads are Sylvester Stallone and Farrah Fawcett's moms and Dustin Hoffman and Al Pacino's dads. Watch Richard and a few of his Silver Foxes promote the new video on The Oprah Winfrey Show in 1986 above.

14. MARY TYLER MOORE

She can turn the world on with her 1994 low-impact workout, Every Woman's Workout.

15. ZSA ZSA GABOR

When you're Zsa Zsa Gabor, you don't actually have to work out. You just hire "two muscley friends" in tank tops to move your body around in various exercise positions for you while you purr "Dahhhhling."

16. GEORGE FOREMAN

You might expect a video by a boxing champion to involve boxing, but you would be wrong. George Foreman's workout is geared more toward the everyman and invites you to just Walk It Off With George. He adds a little jab here and there, and does something dubbed "the Foreman Shuffle," but for the most part keeps it pretty low-key.

17. SALLY STRUTHERS

The former star of All in the Family made a video in 1988 extolling the virtues of walking using the "Balboa Fitness Walking Technique," a type of speedwalking.

18. SHIRLEY MACLAINE

The actress channeled her interest in spiritualism and metaphysics into this 1989 video, Shirley MacLaine's Inner Workout. (Don't miss Part 2.)

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Yoga and Meditation May Lead to an Inflated Ego

If you’ve been exasperated for years by that one self-righteous, yoga-obsessed friend, take note: Regular yoga practitioners experience inflated egos after a session of yoga or meditation, according to a forthcoming study in the journal Psychological Science.

Researchers found that yoga and meditation both increase "self-enhancement," or the tendency for people to attach importance to their own actions. In the first phase of the two-part study, researchers in Germany and England measured self-enhancement by recruiting 93 yoga students and having them respond to questionnaires over the course of 15 weeks, Quartz reports. Each assessment was designed to measure three outcomes: superiority, communal narcissism, and self-esteem. In the second phase, the researchers asked 162 meditation students to answer the same questionnaires over four weeks.

Participants showed significantly higher self-enhancement in the hour just after their practices. After yoga or meditation, participants were more likely to say that statements like "I am the most helpful person I know" and "I have a very positive influence on others" describe them.

At its Hindu and Buddhist roots, yoga is focused on quieting the ego and conquering the self. The findings seem to support what some critics of Western-style yoga suspect—that the practice is no longer true to its South Asian heritage.

It might not be all bad, though. Self-enhancement tends to correlate with higher levels of subjective well-being, at least in the short term. People prone to self-enhancement report feeling happier than the average person. However, they’re also more likely to exhibit social behaviors (like bragging or condescending) that are detrimental in the long term.

So if you think your yoga-loving friends are a little holier than thou, you may be right. But it might be because their yoga class isn’t deflating their egos like yogis say it should.

[h/t Quartz]

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Feeling Down? Lifting Weights Can Lift Your Mood, Too
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iStock

There’s plenty of research that suggests that exercise can be an effective treatment for depression. In some cases of depression, in fact—particularly less-severe ones—scientists have found that exercise can be as effective as antidepressants, which don’t work for everyone and can come with some annoying side effects. Previous studies have largely concentrated on aerobic exercise, like running, but new research shows that weight lifting can be a useful depression treatment, too.

The study in JAMA Psychiatry, led by sports scientists at the University of Limerick in Ireland, examined the results of 33 previous clinical trials that analyzed a total of 1877 participants. It found that resistance training—lifting weights, using resistance bands, doing push ups, and any other exercises targeted at strengthening muscles rather than increasing heart rate—significantly reduced symptoms of depression.

This held true regardless of how healthy people were overall, how much of the exercises they were assigned to do, or how much stronger they got as a result. While the effect wasn’t as strong in blinded trials—where the assessors don’t know who is in the control group and who isn’t, as is the case in higher-quality studies—it was still notable. According to first author Brett Gordon, these trials showed a medium effect, while others showed a large effect, but both were statistically significant.

The studies in the paper all looked at the effects of these training regimes on people with mild to moderate depression, and the results might not translate to people with severe depression. Unfortunately, many of the studies analyzed didn’t include information on whether or not the patients were taking antidepressants, so the researchers weren’t able to determine what role medications might play in this. However, Gordon tells Mental Floss in an email that “the available evidence supports that [resistance training] may be an effective alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for depressive symptoms that could be prescribed on its own and/or in conjunction with other depression treatments,” like therapy or medication.

There haven’t been a lot of studies yet comparing whether aerobic exercise or resistance training might be better at alleviating depressive symptoms, and future research might tackle that question. Even if one does turn out to be better than the other, though, it seems that just getting to the gym can make a big difference.

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