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The Weird Week in Review

Decorated Deer

You are used to seeing deer on lawns as Christmas decorations, but in Colorado Springs, you might see a real decorated deer! A TV news crew was there to capture video when a deer with Christmas lights tangled in its antlers roamed through a neighborhood. A neighbor tried to remove the lights, but couldn't get close enough before the deer ran away. Wildlife experts say the problem should resolve itself when the deer sheds the antlers.

Book 99 Years Overdue Returned to Library

75-year-old Stanley Dudek found a book entitled "Facts I Ought to Know about the Government of My Country" among his mother's possessions when she died in 1998. He didn't know it was a library book at the time. Last year, he noticed the book was due back on May 2, 1910. On Monday, he finally returned the book to the New Bedford Public Library in Massachusetts. The library waived the fine, which would be about $360 at the rate of one cent per day. The book, which was printed in 1894, was given to Dudek's mother in 1922 when she arrived in the US from her native Poland. The library has no records on who originally checked it out.

Drunk 4-Year-Old Steals Christmas Presents

Four-year-old Hayden Wright of Chattanooga, Tennessee was caught drinking beer and stealing Christmas presents from a neighbor's home in the middle of the night. His mother, April Wright woke up and found her son missing. Police found the child wandering the streets in a girl's dress taken from a neighbor's home and drinking a 12-ounce beer. Hayden had bypassed child safety devices on the doors and got the beer from his father's cooler. He then snuck into a neighbor's house and took Christmas presents, and rang the doorbell at another house. April Wright said he may have been looking for his father, or trying to get into trouble so he could be with his father, who is in jail. Hayden was taken to a hospital to be treated for alcohol consumption.

Cow Jumps Six Feet Onto Roof

A homeowner in Blagdon, Somerset, England called police to report damage to his roof. He suspected burglars, but later found it was a cow! Police asked neighbors if they knew anything about the incident, and 17-year-old William de Cothi showed them a photograph he had taken of a cow on the roof. The student had seen the cow on the roof and took a picture because it was so unbelievable. The animal had to jump about six feet to get onto the roof.

Woman Teaches Fox Sign Language

Beth Tyler-King of Hartland, Devon, England has taken in a deaf fox and taught it sign language. Milly the fox was injured when she was picked up by animal control 18 months ago, and found to be completely deaf. Tyler-king, who is also deaf, keeps Milly indoors most of the time as the fox was traumatized by earlier abuse. Milly has learned quite a few hand signals. Tyler King also has other injured animals she cares for.

"˜At the moment, I have got 30 hedgehogs, five owls, seven dogs, 14 cats, five pigeons, a dove, a parrot, and a squirrel.' She also has 12 hens and two ponies.

Food Fight Sends Germans to Hospital

A 74-year-old man and a 35-year-old woman got into an argument over a shopping cart at a supermarket in Aachen, Germany on Saturday. The woman's mother and brother joined in the fray and took the cart, but the elderly man caught up with them and began beating the brother with a salami. The mother grabbed a four-pound hunk of Parmesan cheese and defended her family. Police were summoned, and two of the group were taken to a hospital with minor injuries. The shopping cart was undamaged.

Man Strangles Rabid Bobcat with his Bare Hands

61-year-old James Gruver of Yavapai County, Arizona was attacked by a bobcat. He was looking underneath a trailer on his property when the cat lunged at him, knocking the man down. Gruver kept his wits about him and grabbed the bobcat by the neck and strangled him.

"I just kept a death grip on it because I realized when I was down on the ground, this is getting real serious," he says.

Gruver avoided being bitten, but sustained a few scratches. Arizona has seen a record 244 cases of rabies in animals this year.

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Little Baby's Ice Cream
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Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
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Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
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iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

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