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The Weird Week in Review

Fake Fingerprints by Plastic Surgery

27-year-old Lin Rong re-entered Japan even though she had earlier been deported back to China for overstaying her visa. She wasn't caught until she was arrested on other charges, because her fingerprints were different. Lin had undergone surgery to have her left fingerprints moved to her right hand, and vice versa! Japanese police noticed unusual scars on her fingers when they arrested her for faking a marriage in order to stay in the country. She reportedly paid around $15,000 for the surgery in China.

Weird Norwegian Skies

Wednesday morning, a strange spiral lit up the sky over Norway, from Trøndelag to Finnmark, and many people took pictures. It started as a blue light that looked like a beam reaching up from the earth. It then started spiraling like a disc in the sky. A greenish-blue beam then emanated from the spiral. The strange phenomenon lasted about twelve minutes, then disappeared. It was almost a day later when Russian authorities confirmed that their navy had launched a Bulava ballistic missile, but would not comment on the ship's location or any connection with the lights over Norway.

Man Makes a Living on Discarded Betting Tickets

Jesus Leonardo hasn't placed a single bet in ten years, but he supports his family with his winnings from the off-track betting parlors of New York City. Leonardo picks up tickets discarded by people who thought they had lost bets, and double checks them for winners.

"It is literally found money," he said on a recent night from his private winner's circle. He spends more than 10 hours a day there, feeding thousands of discarded betting slips through a ticket scanner in a never-ending search for someone else's lost treasure.

Leonardo made $45,000 by checking tickets last year, which he gathers with the help of two friends. And yes, he pays income taxes on his winnings.

Fox Takes Escalator to Subway

London Underground passengers were surprised as a fox boarded an escalator at the Walthamstow Central station last Saturday night. He bounded down the down escalator and was shooed back up by maintenance workers at the bottom. The fox dashed back up and sat at the top of the escalator, cool as a cucumber, while bystanders took his picture. Then he walked off on his own accord, apparently disappointed in missing his opportunity for a train ride.

Police Investigate What Defines Jazz

Spanish police raided the Sigüenza Jazz festival because of a report that the music being played wasn't jazzy enough!

Police decided to investigate after an angry jazz buff complained that the Larry Ochs Sax and Drumming Core group was on the wrong side of a line dividing jazz from contemporary music.

The jazz purist claimed his doctor had warned it was "psychologically inadvisable" for him to listen to anything that could be mistaken for mere contemporary music.

The complainant called the cops after concert organizers refused to refund his ticket price. After listening to the music, police decided he might actually have a case.

Judge Orders Makeup for Tattooed Defendant

Neo-Nazi gang member John Ditullio went on trial for murder Monday in Florida. The 23-year-old was prepared by a court-ordered makeup artist before appearing before the jury. Ditullio's lawyer had argued that certain tattoos Ditullio got after he was arrested could prejudice the jury. Those tattoos included barbed wire, a swastika, and an obscene word. The judge agreed and ordered that those tattoos be covered by makeup. However, the judge's orders stated that tattoos Ditullio had before he was arrested for the 2006 murder not be covered up.

Boy's Tongue Sticks to Metal Pole

In a scene reminiscent of the movie A Christmas Story, a boy in Boise, Idaho was rescued after he touched his tongue to a metal pole in freezing weather. Firefighters used a glass of water to free the boy, who was unidentified but is estimated to be about ten years old. The boy's tongue bled a little, but he continued walking to school after the incident Tuesday morning.

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Little Baby's Ice Cream
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Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
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Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
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iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

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