Mel Blanc: Man of a Thousand Voices

Although you may have never seen Mel Blanc's face, you've definitely heard his voice -- he voiced hundreds of classic cartoon characters including Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Speedy Gonzales, Barney Rubble, Foghorn Leghorn, and bunches more. Known as the "man of a thousand voices," he actually claims roughly 400 voices in the video below -- a late 80's interview with David Letterman (Blanc died in 1989).

In the interview, Letterman asks Blanc how he develops the characters' voices. Blanc replies, "They show me a picture of the character, and then they show me a storyboard which shows what the character is going to do in the cartoon. From this I have to create the voice. Like, Bugs they said was a 'tough little stinker.' So I thought, 'Which is the toughest voice in this country? The Brooklyn or the Bronx?' [speaking in Bugs Bunny voice] So I, uh, put the two of them together, and that's how I got the voice of Bugs, doc!" (Blanc's tombstone bears the motto "That's All Folks")

Watch as a master performs a few of his famous voices and explains his process. After the jump (below the video) is a partial list of his most notable cartoon voices, cribbed from Wikipedia.

  • Porky Pig (1936-1989, assumed from Joe Dougherty)
  • The Maxwell (Jack Benny's car in "The Mouse that Jack Built")
  • Daffy Duck (1937-1989)
  • Bugs Bunny's prototype/Happy Rabbit (1938-1940)
  • Bugs Bunny (1940-1989)
  • Woody Woodpecker (1940-1941)
  • Hiawatha (1941)
  • Cecil Turtle (1941-1947)
  • Tweety Bird (1942-1989)
  • Private Snafu, numerous World War II related cartoons (1943)
  • Yosemite Sam (1945-1987)
  • Pepe Le Pew (1945-1989)
  • Sylvester (1945-1989) aka Thomas (1947) in some films.
  • Foghorn Leghorn (1946-1987)
  • The Barnyard Dawg (1946-1989)
  • Henery Hawk (1946-1989)
  • Charlie Dog (1947)
  • Mac (of Mac & Tosh) (1947)
  • K-9 (1948) (sidekick to Marvin the Martian)
  • Marvin the Martian (1948-1989)
  • Sylvester J. Pussycat, Jr. Mel also plays Sylvester's son Sylvester Junior when the young cat was introduced (1949)
  • Beaky Buzzard (1950)
  • Curt Martin (1950-1 episode Hillbilly Hare)
  • Elmer Fudd (1950, 1958, 1970s and 1980s, replacing Arthur Q. Bryan)
  • Bruno the Bear (1951)
  • Wile E. Coyote (silent until 1952, first spoke in the short "Operation: Rabbit")
  • Speedy Gonzales (1953)
  • The Tasmanian Devil (1954-1960) aka Taz
  • Barney Rubble (1960-1989)
  • Dino (1960-1989) (Fred Flintstone's pet.)
  • Cosmo G. Spacely (1962-1989)
  • Hardy Har Har (1962-1964)
  • Tom Cat and Jerry Mouse (1963-1967)
  • Secret Squirrel (1965-1966)
  • Frito Bandito (1967-1971)
  • Bubba McCoy from "Where's Huddles?"
  • Chugga-Boom/Yak Yak/The Bully Brothers also from "The Perils of Penelope Pitstop"
  • Speed Buggy (1973)
  • Tucker the Mouse from "The Cricket in Times Square" (1973) and two sequels
  • Captain Caveman (1977)
  • Twiki from Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (1979)
  • Heathcliff (1980, appeared in syndication from 1984-1987)
  • Gideon from Pinocchio
  • Bertie Mouse (of Hubie and Bertie)
  • Marc Antony
  • Moo the Cow in Berkeley Farms Radio Ads. "Farms in Berkeley....Moooo"
  • Officer Short Shrift, several Lethargians, three out of five of the royal palace guards, The Word Speller, The Dodecahedron, and The Demon of Insincerity from The Phantom Tollbooth (1969)

You can read more about Mel Blanc at Wikipedia.

(Via Kung Fu Grippe.)

Warner Bros.
Pop Culture
Jack Torrance's Corduroy Jacket from The Shining Can Be Yours (If You've Got $12,000 to Spare)
Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.

All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy … but at least he's stylish. In a 60-year career full of memorable performances, Jack Nicholson's role in The Shining as Jack Torrance—the husband, father, and blocked writer who convinces his family to move to an empty ski resort for the winter so that he can finally finish writing the great American novel, then slowly descends into madness—remains one of his most iconic, and terrifying, characters. Now, via Italian auction house Aste Bolaffi, director Stanley Kubrick's former assistant and longtime friend Emilio D'Alessandro is giving fans of the brilliantly nuanced psychological drama the chance to own a piece of the movie's history, including the burgundy corduroy jacket that Nicholson wore throughout the movie.

According to the item's listing, the jacket was chosen by Oscar-winning costume designer Milena Canonero "after Jack Nicholson insisted it should be worn by his character, Jack Torrance, and a small number of it were made for the shooting of the film." It's a perfect accessory for a variety of activities, including shooting the breeze with a cocktail-serving ghost or chasing your family through a hedge maze in the middle of a snowstorm. Just be ready to pay a pretty penny for it: the bidding starts at €10,000, or just north of $12,000.

The jacket is one of many pieces of original Kubrick memorabilia going up for sale: props from A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, Eyes Wide Shut, and Full Metal Jacket are among the other items up for grabs (for the right price), as is a rare cut of The Shining featuring a never-released scene. "These cuts, given by Kubrick to D'Alessandro, are particularly rare because the director notoriously burned all the leftovers at the conclusion of the editing," according to the listing.

You can browse the entire auction catalog, here.

[h/t IndieWire]

5 Things We Know About Deadpool 2

After Deadpool pocketed more than $750 million worldwide in its theatrical run, a sequel was put on the fast track by Fox to capitalize on the original's momentum. It's a much different position to be in for a would-be franchise that was stuck in development hell for a decade, and with Deadpool 2's May 18, 2018 release date looming, the slow trickle of information is going to start picking up speed—beginning with the trailer, which just dropped. Though most of the movie is still under wraps, here's what we know so far about the next Deadpool.


The tendency with comic book movie sequels is to keep cramming more characters in until the main hero becomes a supporting role. While Deadpool 2 is set to expand the cast from the first film with the addition of Domino (Zazie Beetz), the return of Colossus and Negasonic Teenage Warhead, and the formation of X-Force, writer Rhett Reese is adamant about still making sure it's a Deadpool movie.

"Yeah, it’ll be a solo movie," Reese told Deadline. "It’ll be populated with a lot of characters, but it is still Deadpool’s movie, this next one."


Fans have been waiting for Cable to come to theaters ever since the first X-Men movie debuted in 2000, but up until now, the silver-haired time traveler has been a forgotten man. Thankfully, that will change with Deadpool 2, and he'll be played by Josh Brolin, who is also making another superhero movie appearance in 2018 as the villain Thanos in Avengers: Infinity War. In the comics, Cable and Deadpool are frequent partners—they even had their own team-up series a few years back—and that dynamic will play out in the sequel. The characters are so intertwined, there were talks of possibly having him in the original.

"It’s a world that’s so rich and we always thought Cable should be in the sequel," Reese told Deadline. "There was always debate whether to put him in the original, and it felt like we needed to set up Deadpool and create his world first, and then bring those characters into his world in the next one."

Cable is actually the son of X-Men member Cyclops and a clone of Jean Grey named Madelyne Pryor (that's probably the least confusing thing about him, to be honest). While the movie might not deal with all that history, expect Cable to still play a big role in the story.


Although Deadpool grossed more than $750 million worldwide and was a critical success, it still wasn't enough to keep original director Tim Miller around for the sequel. Miller recently came out and said he left over concerns that the sequel would become too expensive and stylized. Instead, Deadpool 2 will be helmed by John Wick (2014) director David Leitch. Despite the creative shuffling, the sequel will still feature star Ryan Reynolds and writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick.

“He’s just a guy who’s so muscular with his action," Reynolds told Entertainment Weekly of Leitch's hiring. "One of the things that David Leitch does that very few filmmakers can do these days is they can make a movie on an ultra tight minimal budget look like it was shot for 10 to 15 times what it cost,"


No, this won't be the title of the movie when it hits theaters, but the working title for Deadpool 2 while it was in production was, appropriately, Love Machine.


The natural instinct for any studio is to make the sequel to a hit film even bigger. More money for special effects, more action scenes, more everything. That's not the direction Deadpool 2 is likely heading in, though, despite Miller's fears. As producer Simon Kinberg explained, it's about keeping the unique tone and feel of the original intact.

"That’s the biggest mandate going into on the second film: to not make it bigger," Kinberg told Entertainment Weekly. "We have to resist the temptation to make it bigger in scale and scope, which is normally what you do when you have a surprise hit movie."


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