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Cool Rider

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We're always looking for cooler methods of transportation. Cooler, meaning it looks good, it goes fast, it's fun, and more and more it also means smaller and simpler. We want smaller bicycles we can carry with one hand or in a backpack. We want skates that don't take up the entire closet floor. We want smaller engines that consume less power.

The Cool Rider is a minimalist design with the motor right inside the wheel. Fully assembled, it looks somewhat like a scooter. Take the bottom part off and it is even more minimalist -just a wheel on a stick that will pull you on your skates or a skateboard. The electric motor can achieve speeds of up to 12 miles per hour. A removable battery plugs into your wall to recharge, and will power the Cool Rider for an hour.

280cool3I couldn't find a video of this gadget in use, and I haven't read a review from anyone who has one, so I have all kinds of questions. How heavy is this? If it's light enough to carry up the stairs, then I can see a problem with it bouncing on the pavement instead of hugging the road. The road? It doesn't seem safe enough for a busy road. If it is to be driven on a sidewalk, then it may run into the same problems as the Segway in that it is just too fast to share space with pedestrians. I hope that it has a kill bar like a lawnmower that makes the motor die if it gets away from you. A commenter at Dvice compared this idea to using a weed whacker to propel yourself along the street. The price is $1,250 with a $50 shipping charge, so I suppose the machine has some heft to it. Yeah, that's a lot cheaper than a Segway, but a lot of money to put out for an online purchase. I want to try something out before I lay down that kind of cash. Or at least see someone use it on YouTube.

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Spéciale
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Improve Your Chopping Skills With This Knife-Cutting Board Hybrid
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Spéciale

Chopping ingredients properly is an impressive skill, and for those who haven’t mastered it yet, this part of the cooking process can be a pain. Luckily, it is possible to do your slicing and dicing without the awkward hand positions and frequent slip-ups. All you need is a knife that stays attached to the board where you’re doing the cutting.

Spotted over at Mashable, spéciale is a high-quality walnut cutting board that comes with a 17-inch Damascus steel knife built in. Whether you’re breaking down fruits, vegetables, cheese, or charcuterie, the blade can rotate across the board as you cut while the tip stays fixed in place. This leaves one hand free, so you don’t have to pause to put down your glass of wine before the chopping starts.

The designers focused on aesthetics along with functionality, so when the board is not being used in the kitchen it doubles as a serving platter. And after you’ve had a chance to enjoy the fruit of your labors, you can pop the knife off the board for easy clean-up.

Spéciale recently wrapped up a campaign on Kickstarter where it raised more than $150,500, and prior to that it debuted on Indiegogo, where it raised nearly $170,000. The product is still available to order through the Indiegogo page for $195.

[h/t Mashable]

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Retro Games Limited
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The Commodore 64 Will Return as a Mini Console With Dozens of Games
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Retro Games Limited

Today’s video games may be more innovative than ever, but that doesn’t stop many from returning to the old-school games that remind them of their childhood. Following Nintendo’s massive success with the NES Classic in 2016 and the SNES Classic in September, the Commodore 64 is set to be the next vintage gaming device to get a miniature makeover. As Nerdist reports, Retro Games Limited will release a plug-and-play version of the 1982 bestseller in 2018.

The C64 Mini will be half the size of the original Commodore 64 computer and will feature 64 retro 8-bit titles, including Impossible Mission, Armalyte, Paradroid, and California Games. The kit will include a joystick, an HDMI cable for hooking up the console to your TV, and a USB power cable for charging it.

The console will have two USB ports that can be used to connect an extra joystick or plug in a full-sized keyboard to use the C64 Mini for simple coding. This could be especially useful when you get bored of the pre-loaded games and want to program a new one of your own from scratch.

The C64 Mini is set to retail for around $70 when it hits shelves in 2018, making it $10 cheaper than the newly-released SNES classic. Retro Games also plans to revive a full-sized version of the original Commodore 64 to sell in 2018. For an idea of what that might look like, check out this classic Commodore 64 how-to video from 1982.

[h/t Nerdist]

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