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The Late Movies: Dogs Welcoming Home Soldiers

I can't begin to imagine how hard it would be to leave my family for months at a time, especially if my destination were Iraq or Afghanistan. And I don't know how I could deal with my wife being deployed overseas. These reunion videos—for me, at least—shed a tiny beam of light on how emotionally draining being a military family can be. They'll also make you want a dog. To commemorate Veterans Day, here are some overjoyed dogs greeting returning soldiers.

In our first clip, Gracie welcomes her dad, who has returned from Afghanistan.

I'm not sure I've ever heard anything make a sound quite like this. How great are dogs?

We've posted this incredible clip before—dogs greeting a soldier after 14 months in Iraq. Worth watching again.

Basset hound Reggie welcomes his best friend home from Afghanistan.

Rocky gives his favorite soldier the welcome home he deserves.

From the YouTube description: "Soldier daddy comes home after a month of training, and the pups go ballistic!"

This boxer was cautious at first, but that caution was quickly replaced by excessive jubilation.

Dachshunds Franklin and Sally give a vocal welcome to their dad, a U.S. Navy man returning from an eight-month deployment to Kuwait. (According to the YouTube description, Franklin and Sally are both rescue dogs. If this video has put you in a dachshund-adopting mood, contact Southern States Dachshund Rescue at ssdr.org or Dachshund Rescue of North America at drna.org.)

This soldier is attacked (and nearly hurdled) by his pups.
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On this Veterans Day eve, here's hoping all our men and women serving overseas get to come home soon. And when they do, I hope they all get equally enthusiastic greetings—from dogs and cats, sons and daughters, significant others, parents, neighbors, friends, and grateful strangers.

Thank you for your service. Get home safe. Your puppies need you.

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The Evolution of "Two" in the Indo-European Language Family
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The Indo-European language family includes most of the languages of Europe as well as many languages in Asia. There is a long research tradition that has shown, though careful historical comparison, that languages spanning a huge linguistic and geographical range, from French to Greek to Russian to Hindi to Persian, are all related to each other and sprung from a common source, Proto-Indo-European. One of the techniques for studying the relationship of the different languages to each other is to look at the similarities between individual words and work out the sound changes that led from one language to the next.

This diagram, submitted to Reddit by user IronChestplate1, shows the word for two in various Indo-European languages. (The “proto” versions, marked with an asterisk, are hypothesized forms, built by working backward from historical evidence.) The languages cluster around certain common features, but the words are all strikingly similar, especially when you consider the words for two in languages outside the Indo-European family: iki (Turkish), èjì (Yoruba), ni (Japanese), kaksi (Finnish), etc. There are many possible forms two could take, but in this particular group of languages it is extremely limited. What are the chances of that happening by accident? Once you see it laid out like this, it doesn’t take much to put *dwóh and *dwóh together.

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infographics
Beyond Plumbing: 19 Other Jobs on Mario's Resume
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Nintendo made news this week by subtly announcing that Mario is no longer a plumber. In fact, they're really downplaying his whole plumbing career. On the character's Japanese-language bio, the company says, "He also seems to have worked as a plumber a long time ago."

But Mario has always had plenty of jobs on the side. Here's a look at his resume:

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