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The Weekend Links

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From the Annals of Too Much Time: An incredible movie mashup that creates a song (that rhymes! with a beat!) from bits of dialogue spanning TV and movies from the '20s onward. (Also try playing the game of "which movie is that from?" while you watch)
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Will the Duggars inherit the earth? Is Jim Bob the new Genghis Khan? Scary!
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Bored at work? Try getting inspiration from some of these Best Office Pranks of All Time. As the site aptly says, "Nothing says happy birthday like being an obsessive compulsive prick."
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Just another reason to stay out of the water (ok ok, so these creatures are typically REALLY far down in the ocean ... but still!): the 12 Most Bizarre and Frightening Deep Sea Creatures.
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Still, we shouldn't pick on deep sea dwellers just because they aren't stupidly cute. After all, some very gorgeous things can be quite deadly, such as these 13 unassuming poisonous plants.
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From Jan: If you think you know your car facts (or at least can recognize cars based on several arcane-to-obvious clues), try your hand at this car quiz. (er ... I made a D)
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Sure, the writer-director or actor-singer is nothing new. But a singer-wrestler? When certain celebrity's careers tank, they might turn to wrestling to get a small second wind going (See: K-Fed, Steve-O), but unfortunately fame rarely goes the other way. Here is a list of 7 professional wrestlers who unsuccessfully tried to become musicians.
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Sure, most of you will have seen the majority of these Eye-Popping Illusions, but I always find them fun. Someone in the comments posted a link to one in particular which I hadn't seen before, and I couldn't get over it. Too cool!

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1Nebraska
8 Cutting-Edge Cheese Sculptures
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It was always hard for me to believe in French class that a cow or dog made a completely different sound in France than it did in the United States. But perhaps they do ... after all, it turns out that newborn babies cry in their native tongues!
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So what exactly separates humans from animals? As this chart proves, less than you think.
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Interesting and sobering space images that compares Earth's size to the other planets as well as other stars in our solar system and far beyond.
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Sure we all get tired of getting menus stuffed under our doors, but how far would you go to stop it? This note surely takes the cake! Do any of you Flossers have proven methods of your own?
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Feel like sleeping away a third of your life is a waste? Here are some different sleep techniques to maximize sleep efficiency. (Has anyone tried any of this alternative methods?)
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Further proof that, to cats, humans are just large head-scratching machines.
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A very apt comic for anyone who knows (or who is!) an indie rock snob.
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Finally, a "do with this what you will" link: Aileen sent in this odd video and admitted that the drummer in question is her brother, and Flossy reader Danyel also sent in the same link (a rare occurrence), so it must be popular in some circles this week! (This was a close contender for the "Annals of Too Much Time")
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I hope everyone had a great week and restful weekend ahead. Just don't forget to keep sending in those great links! Submit all finds to FlossyLinks@gmail.com

[Last Weekend's Links]

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images
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science
6 Radiant Facts About Irène Joliot-Curie
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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Though her accomplishments are often overshadowed by those of her parents, the elder daughter of Marie and Pierre Curie was a brilliant researcher in her own right.

1. SHE WAS BORN TO, AND FOR, GREATNESS.

A black and white photo of Irene and Marie Curie in the laboratory in 1925.
Irène and Marie in the laboratory, 1925.
Wellcome Images, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 4.0

Irène’s birth in Paris in 1897 launched what would become a world-changing scientific dynasty. A restless Marie rejoined her loving husband in the laboratory shortly after the baby’s arrival. Over the next 10 years, the Curies discovered radium and polonium, founded the science of radioactivity, welcomed a second daughter, Eve, and won a Nobel Prize in Physics. The Curies expected their daughters to excel in their education and their work. And excel they did; by 1925, Irène had a doctorate in chemistry and was working in her mother’s laboratory.

2. HER PARENTS' MARRIAGE WAS A MODEL FOR HER OWN.

Like her mother, Irène fell in love in the lab—both with her work and with another scientist. Frédéric Joliot joined the Curie team as an assistant. He and Irène quickly bonded over shared interests in sports, the arts, and human rights. The two began collaborating on research and soon married, equitably combining their names and signing their work Irène and Frédéric Joliot-Curie.

3. SHE AND HER HUSBAND WERE AN UNSTOPPABLE PAIR.

Black and white photo of Irène and Fréderic Joliot-Curie working side by side in their laboratory.
Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Their passion for exploration drove them ever onward into exciting new territory. A decade of experimentation yielded advances in several disciplines. They learned how the thyroid gland absorbs radioiodine and how the body metabolizes radioactive phosphates. They found ways to coax radioactive isotopes from ordinarily non-radioactive materials—a discovery that would eventually enable both nuclear power and atomic weaponry, and one that earned them the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1935.

4. THEY FOUGHT FOR JUSTICE AND PEACE.

The humanist principles that initially drew Irène and Frédéric together only deepened as they grew older. Both were proud members of the Socialist Party and the Comité de Vigilance des Intellectuels Antifascistes (Vigilance Committee of Anti-Fascist Intellectuals). They took great pains to keep atomic research out of Nazi hands, sealing and hiding their research as Germany occupied their country, Irène also served as undersecretary of state for scientific research of the Popular Front government.

5. SHE WAS NOT CONTENT WITH THE STATUS QUO.

Irène eventually scaled back her time in the lab to raise her children Hélène and Pierre. But she never slowed down, nor did she stop fighting for equality and freedom for all. Especially active in women’s rights groups, she became a member of the Comité National de l'Union des Femmes Françaises and the World Peace Council.

6. SHE WORKED HERSELF TO DEATH.

Irène’s extraordinary life was a mirror of her mother’s. Tragically, her death was, too. Years of watching radiation poisoning and cancer taking their toll on Marie never dissuaded Irène from her work. In 1956, dying of leukemia, she entered the Curie Hospital, where she followed her mother’s luminous footsteps into the great beyond.

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iStock
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Live Smarter
You Can Now Order Food Through Facebook
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iStock

After a bit of controversy over its way of aggregating news feeds and some questionable content censoring policies, it’s nice to have Facebook roll out a feature everyone can agree on: allowing you to order food without leaving the social media site.

According to a press release, Facebook says that the company decided to begin offering food delivery options after realizing that many of its users come to the social media hub to rate and discuss local eateries. Rather than hop from Facebook to the restaurant or a delivery service, you’ll be able to stay within the app and select from a menu of food choices. Just click “Order Food” from the Explore menu on a desktop interface or under the “More” option on Android or iOS devices. There, you’ll be presented with options that will accept takeout or delivery orders, as well as businesses participating with services like Delivery.com or EatStreet.

If you need to sign up and create an account with Delivery.com or Jimmy John’s, for example, you can do that without leaving Facebook. The feature is expected to be available nationally, effective immediately.

[h/t Forbes]

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