The Origins of All 30 NBA Team Names

LeBron and Steph
LeBron and Steph
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The Hornets were supposed to be the Spirit, while the Grizzlies were almost named the Mounties. Why is a team in Los Angeles nicknamed the Lakers, and what's a team called the Jazz doing in Utah? Here's the story behind the nicknames of all 30 teams.

Atlanta Hawks

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In 1948, the cities of Moline and Rock Island, IL, and Davenport, IA—collectively known as the Tri-Cities at the time—were awarded a team in the National Basketball League. The team was nicknamed the Blackhawks, who, like Chicago's hockey team, were named after the Sauk Indian Chief Black Hawk. When the team moved to Milwaukee in 1951, the nickname was shortened to Hawks. The franchise retained the shortened moniker for subsequent moves to St. Louis and finally Atlanta in 1968.

Boston Celtics

Celtics coach Brad Stevens

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Team owner Walter Brown personally chose Celtics over Whirlwinds, Olympians, and Unicorns (yes, Unicorns) as the nickname for Boston's Basketball Association of America team in 1946. Despite the warnings of one of his publicity staffers, who told Brown, "No team with an Irish name has ever won a damned thing in Boston," Brown liked the winning tradition of the nickname; the New York Celtics were a successful franchise during the 1920s.

Brooklyn Nets


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The New Jersey Americans joined the American Basketball Association in 1967 and moved to New York the following season. The team was renamed the New York Nets, which conveniently rhymed with Jets and Mets, two of the Big Apple's other professional franchises. Before the 1977-78 season, the team returned to New Jersey but kept its nickname. In 1994, the Nets were reportedly considering changing their nickname to the Swamp Dragons to boost its marketing efforts. The franchise relocated to Brooklyn in 2012.

Charlotte Hornets

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The three finalists in the name-the-team contest for Charlotte's 2004 expansion franchise were Bobcats, Dragons, and Flight. Owner Bob Johnson was fond of BOBcats, but some of the league's players were less than impressed. "It sounds like a girls' softball team to me," Steve Kerr told reporters at the time. "I guess it shows there aren't many good nicknames left to be had." Perhaps Kerr was right. Bobcats became the Charlotte Hornets in 2014, reuniting the city with its previous NBA franchise's original nickname.

Where did Hornets come from? In 1987, George Shinn and his ownership group announced that Spirit would be the nickname of Charlotte's prospective expansion franchise. Fans voiced their displeasure, and it didn't help that some fans associated the nickname with the PTL Club, a Charlotte-based evangelical Christian television program that was the subject of an investigative report by the Charlotte Observer for its fundraising activities. Shinn decided to sponsor a name-the-team contest and had fans vote on six finalists. More than 9000 ballots were cast and Hornets won by a landslide, beating out Knights, Cougars, Spirit, Crowns, and Stars. Afterwards, Shinn noted that the nickname had some historical significance; during the Revolutionary War, a British commander reportedly referred to the area around Charlotte as a "hornet’s nest of rebellion."

Chicago Bulls

Chicago Bulls
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According to the Chicago Bulls Encyclopedia, team owner Richard Klein was brainstorming nicknames for his new franchise in 1966 and wanted a name that portrayed Chicago's status as the meat capital of the world. Another theory is that Klein admired the strength and toughness of bulls. Klein was considering Matadors and Toreadors when his young son exclaimed, "Dad, that's a bunch of bull!" The rest is somewhat dubious history.

Cleveland Cavaliers


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Fans voted Cavaliers the team nickname in 1970 in a poll conducted by the Cleveland Plain-Dealer. The other finalists included Jays, Foresters, Towers, and Presidents. The Presidents nickname was presumably an allusion to the fact that seven former U.S. Presidents were born in Ohio, second only to Virginia. Jerry Tomko, who suggested Cavaliers in the contest, wrote, "Cavaliers represent a group of daring fearless men, whose life pact was never surrender, no matter what the odds." (Tomko's son, Brett, went on to become a Major League pitcher.)

Dallas Mavericks

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A Dallas radio station sponsored a name-the-team contest and recommended the finalists to team owner Donald Carter, who ultimately chose Mavericks over Wranglers and Express. The 41 fans who suggested Mavericks each won a pair of tickets to the season opener and one of those fans, Carla Springer, won a drawing for season tickets. Springer, a freelance writer, said the nickname "represents the independent, flamboyant style of the Dallas people." That's certainly an apt description for current team owner Mark Cuban.

Denver Nuggets


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Denver's ABA team was originally known as the Rockets. When the team was preparing to move to the NBA in 1974, they needed a new nickname, as Rockets was already claimed by the franchise in Houston. Nuggets, an allusion to the city's mining tradition and the Colorado Gold Rush during the late 1850s and early 1860s, was chosen via a name-the-team contest.

Detroit Pistons


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The Pistons trace their roots to Fort Wayne, Indiana, where they were known as the Zollner Pistons. (Best logo ever.) What's a Zollner Piston? A piston manufactured by then-team owner Fred Zollner, who named the club after his personal business. When the team moved to Detroit in 1957, Zollner dropped his name from the nickname but retained Pistons. The name was fitting for the Motor City.

Golden State Warriors

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The Philadelphia Warriors, named after the 1920s team that played in the American Basketball League, won the championship in the inaugural 1946-47 season of the Basketball Association of America. The Warriors moved from Philadelphia to San Francisco after the 1961-62 season and retained their nickname. When the team relocated across the Bay to Oakland in 1971, they were renamed the Golden State Warriors.

Houston Rockets

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The Houston Rockets originally called San Diego home. Rockets was chosen via a name-the-team contest and was a reference to the city's theme, "A City In Motion." Liquid-fueled Atlas rockets were also being manufactured in San Diego. When the team moved to Houston in 1971, it made perfectly good sense to keep the name, as Houston was home to a NASA space center.

Indiana Pacers

Indiana Pacers
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According to Michael Leo Donovan's book on team nicknames, Yankees to Fighting Irish: What's Behind Your Favorite Team's Name, the Pacers' nickname was decided upon in 1967 by the team's original investors, including attorney Richard Tinkham. The nickname is a reference to Indiana's rich harness and auto racing history. Pacing describes one of the main gaits for harness racing, while pace cars are used for auto races, such as the Indianapolis 500.

Los Angeles Clippers


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When the NBA's Buffalo Braves moved to San Diego in 1978, the owners wanted to rebrand the team with a new nickname. They settled on Clippers, a popular type of ship during the 19th century. San Diego had been home to the Conquistadors/Sails of the ABA during the 1970s. Donald Sterling bought the Clippers during the 1981-82 season and relocated them to his native Los Angeles in 1984. He lost all respect in San Diego but kept the Clippers name.

Los Angeles Lakers

Lonzo Ball, Los Angeles Lakers
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How many natural lakes are there in Los Angeles? The short answer: Less than 10,000. When a pair of investors relocated the Detroit Gems of the National Basketball League to Minneapolis before the 1947 season, they sought a name that would ring true with the team's new home. Given that Minnesota is "The Land of 10,000 Lakes," they settled on Lakers. When the Lakers moved to Los Angeles before the 1960 season, their nickname was retained, in part because of the tradition the team had established in Minnesota.

Memphis Grizzlies

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When Vancouver was awarded an expansion franchise in 1994 to begin play the following season, the team's owners had tentative plans to name the team the Mounties. The Royal Mounted Canadian Police and fans alike objected, so team officials resumed their search for a name. The local newspaper sponsored a name-the-team contest, which club officials monitored before choosing Grizzlies, an indigenous species to the area, over Ravens. When the team relocated to Memphis before the 2001-02 season, FedEx was prepared to offer the Grizzlies $100 million to rename the team the Express, but the NBA rejected the proposal.

Miami Heat

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In October 1986, the owners of Miami's expansion franchise selected Stephanie Freed's Heat submission from more than 20,000 entries, which also included Sharks, Tornadoes, Beaches, and Barracudas.

Milwaukee Bucks


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Despite Wisconsin’s hunting tradition, the most popular entry in the contest to name Milwaukee’s NBA franchise wasn’t Bucks. It was Robins. The judges overruled the public and decided on a more indigenous (and much stronger) name. The choice could have been much worse: Skunks was among the other entries.

Minnesota Timberwolves

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The ownership group for Minnesota's prospective franchise chose Timberwolves through a name-the-team contest in 1986. The nickname beat out Polars by a 2-1 margin in the final vote, which was conducted in 333 of the state's 842 city councils. Tim Pope, who was one of the first fans to nominate Timberwolves, won a trip to the NBA All-Star Game. Pope submitted 10 nicknames in all, including Gun Flints. "I thought a two-word name would win," he told a reporter. The most popular entry in the contest was Blizzard, but the team wanted a nickname that was more unique to its home state. "Minnesota is the only state in the lower 48 with free-roaming packs of timber wolves," a team official said.

New Orleans Pelicans

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Soon after Tom Benson purchased the New Orleans Hornets in 2012, the team announced they were going to change their name. According to Yahoo's Marc J. Spears, they "considered the nicknames Krewe (groups of costumed paraders in the annual Mardi Gras carnival in New Orleans) and Brass," but settled on Pelicans—after the brown pelican, Louisiana's state bird.

New York Knicks

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The term "Knickerbockers" referred specifically to pants rolled up just below the knee by Dutch settlers in the New World during the 1600s. Many of these settlers found homes in and around New York City, where a cartoon drawing of Father Knickerbocker became a prominent symbol of the city. In 1845, baseball's first organized team was nicknamed the Knickerbocker Nine and the name was evoked again in 1946 when New York was granted a franchise in the Basketball Association of America. Team founder Ned Irish reportedly made the decision to call the team the Knickerbockers—supposedly after pulling the name out of a hat.

Oklahoma City Thunder

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When the Seattle SuperSonics relocated to Oklahoma City after the 2007-08 season, fans voted on potential nicknames from an original list of 64 possibilities. Thunder was chosen over Renegades, Twisters, and Barons, and the name was extremely well received. The team set sales records for the first day after the nickname was revealed. "There's just all kinds of good thunder images and thoughts, and the in-game experience of Thunder," team chairman Clay Bennett told reporters. The SuperSonics had been named for the Supersonic Transport (SST) project, which had been awarded to Boeing. The company has a large plant in the Seattle area.

Orlando Magic


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When the Orlando Sentinel sponsored a name-the-team contest for Orlando's prospective expansion franchise, Challengers—an allusion to the space shuttle that crashed in 1986—was the most popular suggestion. Other entries included Floridians, Juice, Orbits, Astronauts, Aquamen, and Sentinels, but the panel of judges, including Orlando team officials who reviewed the suggestions, decided to go with Magic. The name is an obvious nod to the tourism-rich city's main attraction, Disney World.

Philadelphia 76ers

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The Syracuse Nationals were relocated to the City of Brotherly Love in 1963 and the team was renamed the 76ers, an allusion to the signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia in 1776.

Phoenix Suns

Phoenix Suns
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General manager Jerry Colangelo, only 28 at the time, settled on a name for his expansion franchise using a name-the-team contest in 1968. Colangelo chose Suns over Scorpions, Rattlers, and Thunderbirds, among the other suggestions included in the 28,000 entries. One lucky fan won $1,000 and season tickets as part of the contest, which included such obscure entries as White Wing Doves, Sun Lovers, Poobahs, Dudes, and Cactus Giants.

Portland Trail Blazers

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In 1970, Portland was granted an expansion franchise in the NBA and team officials announced a name-the-team contest. Of the more than 10,000 entries, Pioneers was the most popular, but was ruled out because nearby Lewis & Clark College was already using the nickname. Another popular entry was Trail Blazers, whose logo is supposed to represent five players on one team playing against five players from another team.

Sacramento Kings


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The Kings' royal lineage stretches all the way back to the founding of the National Basketball League's Rochester Royals in 1945. The Royals retained their nickname after a move to Cincinnati in 1957 and became the Kansas City-Omaha Kings (soon dropping the Omaha) through a name-the-team contest in 1972. The name remained unchanged when the franchise relocated to California in 1985.

San Antonio Spurs


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A group of San Antonio investors purchased the Dallas Chaparrals from the American Basketball Association in 1973 and decided to hold a public contest to rename the team. Five thousand entries with over 500 names were submitted. After reconsidering their first decision to call the team the Aztecs (several teams already used that name), the judges (investors and local press representatives) settled on Spurs. It may have just been a coincidence that one of the team's main investors, Red McCombs, was born in Spur, Texas.

Toronto Raptors

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The ownership group of Toronto's prospective expansion team conducted extensive marketing research across Canada in 1994 and held a nationwide vote that helped team officials come up with a list of potential nicknames. Raptors, which Jurassic Park helped popularize the year before, was eventually chosen over runners-up Bobcats and Dragons.

Utah Jazz

Quin Snyder, Utah Jazz
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No, Utah isn't known for its Jazz. The team originated in New Orleans in 1974 and club officials decided to keep the name after relocating to Salt Lake City in 1979. The Jazz nickname was originally chosen through a name-the-team contest, which produced seven other finalists: Dukes, Crescents, Pilots, Cajuns, Blues, Deltas, and Knights. Deltas would've translated to Salt Lake City rather well (the airline of the same name has a hub there), while Cajuns may have been even worse than Jazz.

Washington Wizards

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In the early 1990s, Washington Bullets owner Abe Pollin was becoming frustrated with the association of his team's nickname and gun violence. After Pollin's friend, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, was assassinated, Pollin decided to take action and announced his plans to rename the team. (Though Dan Steinberg of D.C. Sports Bog wrote a very detailed history of the name change, and called into question the impact Rabin's death had on the decision.)

A name-the-team contest was held and fans voted on a list of finalists that included Wizards, Dragons, Express, Stallions, and Sea Dogs. Not long after Wizards was announced as the winning name before the 1997-98 season, the local NAACP chapter president complained that the nickname carried Ku Klux Klan associations. Previous nicknames for the franchise when they were still in Chicago include Packers and Zephyrs.

This post was originally published in 2009.

15 Rim-Shattering Facts About Shaquille O'Neal

Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

The only thing bigger than the 7-foot-1-inch, 325-pound Shaquille O'Neal during his playing career was his outlandish personality. After a remarkable 19-year tenure on the hardwood, these days, Shaq holds court on TNT's Inside the NBA, bringing his trademark humor to the floor and verbally dunking on his preferred sparring partner, Charles Barkley. But well before he hung up his Shaqnosis sneakers in 2011 and stepped behind the commentating desk, the larger-than-life basketball legend had created a sizable name for himself as well. Here are a few things you may not know about this American icon.

1. Shaq was estranged from his biological father until he was in his forties.

Shaquille Rashaun O'Neal was born on March 6, 1972. (He weighed 7 pounds 13 ounces—about average for a baby.) His mother, Lucille O'Neal, had just graduated high school, and his biological father, Joe Toney, was an all-state high school guard who lost his basketball scholarship to Seton Hall because of drug addiction. While Shaq was still an infant, Toney was sentenced to federal prison, and when he was released, Lucille got Joe to legally relinquish his parental rights to Shaq's stepfather, an Army drill sergeant named Phillip Harrison, who raised him from the time he was 2.

Shaq's resulting childhood was a fulfilling one, though he would often return to Vonda's Kitchen, a diner in Newark, New Jersey located right below Toney's apartment, and wonder if he was going to run into his biological father. Once he started to make a name for himself, Toney tried reaching out—one time in Orlando, Shaq left a basketball arena through a back entrance to avoid having to have any interaction with Toney, who had shown up and wanted to meet. Shaq even publicly outlined his feelings about their intentional estrangement in a 1994 rap song, "Biological Didn't Bother." But, with his Basketball Hall of Fame induction on the horizon in the summer of 2016, Shaq finally agreed to meet Joe, then nearing 70, at that restaurant. "I don't hate you," Shaq told him. "I had a good life. I had Phil."

2. Shaq's stepfather once lost some teeth to a Boston Celtics legend.

Harrison, who was also known as Sarge, was a gruff parent who often relied on physical discipline for the young Shaq, claiming he'd rather punish his son himself than see it done on the streets of Newark, beyond his purview. Though tough, Harrison was a pillar in Shaq's life, and Shaq frequently praised Phil for keeping him out of trouble and giving him direction.

Luckily for little Shaquille, Harrison was a ball player himself (he'd actually played against Toney in high school), and he coached Shaq's youth basketball teams throughout his childhood. Harrison would also sometimes brag about the time Dave Cowens, the future Celtics Hall of Fame center, knocked out some of his teeth during a particularly aggressive game of pickup. In August 1969, according to the Tallahassee Democrat, Cowens, who was then a star at Florida State University, happened to be in the Newark area because he decided spend a few days with a fellow FSU teammate who was from nearby. That game of pickup only happened because Cowens decided to bail on his original plan: attending Woodstock.

3. Shaq was already 6 feet 4 inches tall at age 10.

No one was more responsible for kids quitting youth basketball in the greater Newark area than the Big Shaqtus in the mid-'80s. In fact, Shaq remembers a rival's father once storming the court and removing his son from the competition mid-game, shouting, "He's not 10. Bulls***. He's 10, he gonna be the best big man in the world." The man, while enraged, was not at all wrong. By 13, Shaq had grown to 6 feet 6 inches and wore size 17 shoes.

4. Shaq's jersey number was inspired by an NBA legend, with a twist.

Shaquille O'Neal playing for the Orlando Magic in 1995.
Shaquille O'Neal playing for the Orlando Magic in 1995.
TONY RANZE/AFP/Getty Images

Harrison was responsible for Shaq embracing his size and using it to score under the basket, rather than deferring and shying away from his clear physical advantages. By Shaq's teenage years, Harrison had been restationed and moved the family to San Antonio. A now poised and confident player, Shaq led his high school team to a 68-1 record during his junior and senior seasons. The school didn't possess a No. 33 jersey, so Shaq's attempts to honor Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the trailblazing NBA center, were thwarted. Hence, his famous No. 32 jersey was born. When he played at LSU, he was able to nab 33, but in his rookie NBA season in Orlando, veteran Terry Catledge refused to give up his 33 jersey, so it was back to 32 for life for Shaq for the remainder of his time with the Magic.

5. Shaq led his college's conference in basically everything his sophomore year.

The 1990-91 season was Shaq's coming out party. During his second collegiate season at LSU, the Diesel was a man among boys, becoming the first player to ever lead the SEC in scoring (27.6 points per game), rebounds (14.7), field goal percentage (62.8 percent), and blocked shots (140 on the year). And he took his opponents by surprise. Those who expected a round mound of rebound (i.e. another Charles Barkley) were taken aback by his sheer power. As rival Darryl "Ice" Jones of Southeastern Louisiana so eloquently put it, "I thought Shaq would be fat. But he's got no fat, none whatsoever. He's just seven feet of muscle, a muscle monster."

6. Shaq was famously left off the original Dream Team.

Shaquille O'Neal is shown on a TV monitor as the U.S. Olympic basketball team is introduced during a press conference in 1996.
Shaquille O'Neal is shown on a TV monitor as the U.S. Olympic basketball team is introduced during a press conference in 1996.
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And yes, he was upset about it. While the powers that be attempted to choose the best NBA talent possible to represent Team USA and take on the world at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, they reserved one roster spot for a collegiate star. Shaq was a junior at LSU at the time and fully eligible, but the spot instead went with Christian Laettner, a Duke standout who was thought of as more polished. At the time, the international free throw lane was designed differently, and the committee filling out the roster believed that would cause traditional post-up centers (like Shaq) to lose their effectiveness.

Of course, the young Shaq didn't take it well. "I was pissed off," he recalled 20 years later. "I was jealous. But then I had to come to the realization that I was a more explosive, more powerful player, but Christian Laettner was a little bit more fundamentally sound than I was." Luckily, the snub only motivated him: Team USA took home the gold in '92, and they did again in Atlanta during the '96 games. Shaq was on that team.

7. Shaq's LSU teams weren't successful in March Madness.

Somehow, despite featuring the monstrous 7-foot-1-inch, 294-pound Shaq for three full SEC seasons (the Southeastern Conference, the division LSU competes in), his LSU Tigers only went 2-3 in three seasons in the Big Dance, never advancing past the second round. Shaq ended his 1991-92 SEC Player of the Year season with a remarkable 36 points and 12 rebounds (while stunningly going 12-for-12 from the line—a feat he'd never accomplish once he went pro) in an 89-79 loss to Indiana. But these early exits certainly didn't deter NBA scouts; he was still the first overall draft pick in 1992, heading to the Orlando Magic.

8. A rookie Shaq was sickened by the smell of alcohol.

Shaq was immediately the toast of the NBA. Among his many accolades, he was named Rookie of the Year for the '92-'93 season and he nabbed a starting spot in the All-Star Game his first four seasons. But though young Shaq was the new face of the game and the life of the party, at 21, he couldn't stomach alcohol. "Can't even tolerate the smell of table wine," his teammate Dennis Scott used to say. Turns out, there was a good reason for that.

"My father caught me sipping a beer with my cousins when I was, like, 13," O'Neal told Vanity Fair years later. "He made me drink a 12-pack right then. Not only did I get drunk, I hated beer, and I never had the urge to drink again."

Despite his distaste for the stuff, Shaq eventually marketed his own line of vodka, the excellently named Luv Shaq.

9. As Lakers teammates, Shaq and Kobe didn't initially click on court.

Los Angeles Lakers Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O'Neal during a game in 2001.
Los Angeles Lakers Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O'Neal during a game in 2001.
Vince Bucci/AFP/Getty Images

The most prominent portion of Shaq's career was spent in Hollywood, and his eight seasons with the Lakers brought three NBA Championships to the city. But while Shaq's L.A. years are known for being unfathomably dominant, many wonder how fruitful they could've been if he and teammate Kobe Bryant hadn't been so incompatible off the court.

Bizarrely, the two couldn't sync their play properly from the outset based on talent alone. Long before their famous feud and struggle for credit and control of the locker room began, two of their first three campaigns together ended in embarrassing playoff sweeps. It wasn't until head coach Phil Jackson arrived prior to the 1999-2000 season that anything seemed to click. Once Jackson installed his famous triangle offense (emphasizing perfect spacing and high-IQ passing decisions), everything changed; an unstoppable three-peat followed, highlighted by Shaq's averages in the 2000 Finals (45 mins, 38 points, 17 rebounds per game).

10. He destroyed so many backboards the NBA panicked and changed the rule book.

Shaq soundly defeated many inferior opponents over the course of his career, and a few of those opponents were made of solid metal. In one infamous game against the Phoenix Suns in 1993, a particularly thunderous dunk caused the entire basket and its stanchions to collapse; the hoop's whole apparatus had to be wheeled into the tunnel for some mid-game welding. The big man made such a habit of terrorizing the equipment that the NBA freaked out and came out hard in favor of reinforcing their centerpieces. Said competition committee chairman Rod Thorn, "Whether it was Shaquille O'Neal or someone else, with the size of these guys, it was just a matter of time. He just happened to be a little bigger and stronger than most."

The league eventually turned breaking the basket ring or backboard into a technical foul.

11. The New York Times hated his acting performances.

In a cinematic version of love the player, hate the game, The Times's review of 1997's Steel praised Shaq's "endearing smile" and "genial personality," but felt compelled to admit he had an "almost total lack of charisma and acting skills." The year before, they weren't quite as kind to Kazaam (not to be confused with Sinbad's non-existent Shazaam). "Mr. O'Neal can't hold a flickering lamp to Robin Williams," the paper of record claimed (which, to be fair, who can?), and bemoaned that he didn't "slam-dunk the script into the nearest wastebasket." Shaq hasn't done many acting roles since then, but he's done plenty of cameos in everything from The Simpsons and The Real Househusbands of Hollywood to The Lego Movie and What Women Want.

12. Shaq loves nicknames.

Shaquille O'Neal onstage during his Basketball Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony in 2016.
Shaquille O'Neal onstage during his Basketball Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony in 2016.
Jim Rogash/Getty Images

Shaq has propensity for clever nicknaming, and it crosses genres: He's had nicknames and alternate personas spin off into a video game (Shaq Fu) and a rap album (his early nickname "The Diesel" became Shaq Diesel, a 1993 rap album featuring Phife Dawg). Other legendary monikers include "The Big Aristotle" (self-christened in 2000) and "M.D.E." (Most Dominant Ever, which he crafted after his second Lakers title). He called his pool at his former Miami home Shaqapulco.

But the Big Fella (that's another one) isn't just giving out lasting pseudonyms for himself—he's the one who coined "The Big Fundamental" for San Antonio Spurs legend and constant Western Conference rival Tim Duncan early in his career, which has stood the test of time.

13. Shaq once blamed his real-life divorce on his on-court ex, Kobe Bryant.

And we all learned about it in a 2008 freestyle rap. While defending himself against a 2004 rape charge, Bryant alleged that Shaq had paid up to $1 million to various women in order to keep them quiet about his own affairs. "This whole situation is ridiculous," Shaq told ESPN at the time.

A few years later, however, when Shaq and his wife of nearly five years, Shaunie O'Neal (née Nelson), separated in September 2007, he was singing a different tune. Quoth Big Shaqtus in verse: "I'm a horse, Kobe ratted me out, that's why I'm gettin' divorced."

Shaq and Shaunie, who had four kids together during their decade-long relationship, officially ended things in November 2009. And though there was no word on seven-figure payouts, Shaunie alluded to the breakup of her marriage during an episode of VH1's Basketball Wives, which she created and is the executive producer on. "Our Blackberries got switched," she said of a time she went to an event at their kids' school, "and I was like, 'Damn, my phone is going off a lot.' Just girl, after girl, after girl—like, 'Baby, last night what you did.'"

14. The "Hack-a-Shaq" technique was actually invented to stop Dennis Rodman.

Blame former Dallas Mavericks coach Don Nelson for this one. In a December 1997 road game against the Chicago Bulls, Nelson asked rookie Bubba Wells to foul Rodman as many times as possible in order to send the poor-shooting Worm to the line and steal a few possessions. Nelson's ingenious (and incredibly annoying) strategy worked. He went on to victimize Shaq, who was a brutally low 52.7 percent career free throw shooter. The strategy spread through the league like a disease, but in 2016 a rule was approved to curb intentional fouling. The term Hack-a-Shaq, though? Brilliant.

15. Shaq has a major stake in eSports.

Shaquille O'Neal watches the Brooklyn Nets play the Sacramento Kings in 2014.
Shaquille O'Neal watches the Brooklyn Nets play the Sacramento Kings in 2014.
STR/AFP/Getty Images

Call him The Big Controller. Shaq was early to eSports as an investor; in 2016, he, along with Yankees vet Alex Rodriguez and former Phillie Jimmy Rollins, got involved in an ownership group that has a stake in NRG Gaming, a prominent organization of eSports athletes. Now, Shaq is the general manager of Kings Guard, the Sacramento Kings' entrant into the NBA's official 2K league, where competitors face off in NBA 2K, the league's preeminent basketball video game.

And in case you need a soundtrack to your gaming, Shaq has reentered that space as well—he recently teamed with DJ NGHTMRE and Lil Jon to produce the EDM track "BANG," his first new single in 20 years.

What Happens to the Losing Team's Pre-Printed Championship Shirts?

Adam Glanzman, Getty Images
Adam Glanzman, Getty Images

Following a big win in the Super Bowl, World Series, NBA Finals, or any other major sporting event, fans want to get their hands on championship merchandise as quickly as possible. To meet this demand and cash in on the wallet-loosening "We’re #1" euphoria, manufacturers and retailers produce and stock two sets of T-shirts, hats, and other merchandise that declare each team the champ.

On Super Bowl Sunday, that means apparel for the winner—either the New England Patriots or the Los Angeles Rams—will quickly fill clothing racks and gets tossed to players on the field once the game concludes. But what happens to the losing team's clothing? It's destined for charity.

Good360, a charitable organization based in Alexandria, Virginia, handles excess consumer merchandise and distributes it to those in need overseas. The losing team's apparel—usually shirts, hats, and sweatshirts—will be held in inventory locations across the U.S. Following the game, Good360 will be informed of exactly how much product is available and will then determine where the goods can best be of service.

Good360 chief marketing officer Shari Rudolph tells Mental Floss there's no exact count just yet. But in the past, the merchandise has been plentiful. Based on strong sales after the Chicago Bears’s 2007 NFC Championship win, for example, Sports Authority printed more than 15,000 shirts proclaiming a Bears Super Bowl victory well before the game even started. And then the Colts beat the Bears, 29-17.

Good360 took over the NFL's excess goods distribution in 2015. For almost two decades prior, an international humanitarian aid group called World Vision collected the unwanted items for MLB and NFL runners-up at its distribution center in Pittsburgh, then shipped them overseas to people living in disaster areas and impoverished nations. After losing Super Bowl XLIII in 2009, Arizona Cardinals gear was sent to children and families in El Salvador. In 2010, after the New Orleans Saints defeated Indianapolis, the Colts gear printed up for Super Bowl XLIV was sent to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

In 2011, after Pittsburgh lost to the Green Bay Packers, the Steelers Super Bowl apparel went to Zambia, Armenia, Nicaragua, and Romania.

Fans of the Super Bowl team that comes up short can take heart: At least the spoils of losing will go to a worthy cause.

An earlier version of this story appeared in 2009. Additional reporting by Jake Rossen.

All images courtesy of World Vision, unless otherwise noted.

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