6 Theories on the Origin of the Bullpen

Christian Petersen / Getty Images
Christian Petersen / Getty Images

No one really knows where the term bullpen comes from, and no one theory has enough compelling evidence to support or refute the origin. No more certain is the debate about when the word bullpen was first used. OED sites the earliest use dating back to a 1924 Chicago Tribune article, while other sources say the area referring to where pitchers warm up (especially relief pitchers), was first called the bullpen in a Baseball Magazine article published in 1915.

Regardless, the National League Championship series between the Dodgers and Phillies opens tonight, and the pen is certainly going to figure heavily in it. So we thought we'd take a look at six popular bullpen origin theories that have been going around for some time. If we left one of your favorites off the list, by all means tell us about it in the comments below.

1. The fans herded like cattle theory

One of the more likely theories goes like this: In the 1800s, a few innings after a game started, fans could get tickets at the box office for a big discount. But cheap tickets came with a, er, catch: you had to stand in a roped-off area off to the side of the field in foul territory. So the fans were treated a bit like cattle in a pen. When this area became the spot where pitchers warmed up, once relievers became part of the game, the name stuck.

2. The Bull Durham Tobacco theory

In the late 1800s, early 1900s, many stadiums featured giant Bull Durham Tobacco ads on the outfield fence. Because relievers warmed up behind the fence, the picture became associated with the pitchers.

3. The pitcher headed to slaughter theory

This theory suggests that relievers, like bulls, sit in a holding pen before being sent off to slaughter. Though a clear metaphor, certainly as much could be said for a pitcher like Jose Mesa heading out into game 7 of the '97 World Series, right?

4. The Casey Stengel theory

Outfielder and manager Casey (at the Bat) Stengel, used to say that the term came from the fact that relief pitchers sat in the pen shooting the bullsh*t.

5. The rodeo theory

Some argue that the name was taken from another popular sport: rodeo. Here, of course, bulls (and their cowboys) are held in a small pen before being released into the arena. Perhaps the bucking bull is a metaphor for the opposing team ready to knock the cowboy out of the game.

6. The Jon Miller theory

If you live in the Bay-area, you certainly are familiar with Jon Miller's voice calling the Giants' games. A favorite on ESPN's Sunday/Monday night baseball, as well, Miller has said that the term originates with the Giants—that is, the New York Giants, who used to play on the Polo Grounds in the late 1800s. According to Miller, there was a real bull pen out beyond the left-field fence, with real bulls in it! And the relief pitchers warmed up not too far from there.

Simone Biles Just Became the Most Decorated Female Gymnast in History

Fernando Frazão/Agência Brasil, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0 br
Fernando Frazão/Agência Brasil, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0 br

Simone Biles became a household name when she won four gold medals in gymnastics at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Three years later, she has proven that she's still among the best in the sport's history. At the 2019 Gymnastics World Championships in Stuttgart, Germany, Biles won her 21st world champ medal—making her the most decorated female gymnast of all time, The New York Times reports.

The U.S. women's team competed at the event in order to retain their title of best in the world. Biles racked up the highest individual scores with her vault, balance beam, and floor routines, helping the U.S. earn an overall score of 172.330 points. The team bested Russia, the second-place team, by 5.801 points and won their seventh consecutive gold at a world competition or Olympics.

Biles was previously tied with Svetlana Khorkina for most world championship medals held by a female gymnast. She now holds the record for the women's sport, and is just two medals shy of male gymnast Vitaly Scherbo's record of 23.

At 22, Simone Biles has already made a historic impact on the sport. In 2013, she had a difficult new floor exercise move named after her—a double layout with a 180-degree turn at the end.

[h/t The New York Times]

Ski.com Wants to Pay You $2000 to Go on an Epic Ski Vacation

IPGGutenbergUKLtd/iStock via Getty Images
IPGGutenbergUKLtd/iStock via Getty Images

The northern Rockies have already been hit with a massive snowstorm, and that means ski season is almost upon us. This year, Ski.com is planning to make dreams come true for not one, not two, but 12 lucky skiers.

Travel + Leisure reports that the ski vacation booking service will send two people to each of six top ski destinations, where they’ll ski their snow-loving little hearts out and document their adventures on social media. The trips are all-expenses-paid and then some; not only will skiers fly United Airlines and receive VIP resort experiences for free, they’ll also be given gear from Stio, Black Crows, Giro, and GoPro—plus a $2000 paycheck.

To apply, you have to choose one of the six destinations—Aspen Snowmass, Colorado; Jackson Hole, Wyoming; Big Sky, Montana; Banff and Lake Louise, Canada; Chamonix, France; or Niseko, Japan—and create a 90-second video explaining why you’re the best person for the gig. If you’re thinking this is the perfect opportunity to try skiing for the first time ever, you might want to scope out a few bunny slopes on your own and apply for Ski.com’s Epic Dream Job next year: The listing asks that applicants be “able to ski and/or snowboard at an advanced intermediate level.”

Dan Sherman, Ski.com’s chief marketing officer, told Travel + Leisure that the decision to add 11 more winners was partly because “a very passionate community formed online in support of the [nearly 1200] applicants” last year. And, since two people will be sent to each location, you can even apply with a friend.

If you’re interested, submit your video here before October 29, and check out these ways to train off the slopes while you wait for the winners to be announced on November 19.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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