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The Weird Week in Review

Woman Tries to Steal Puppy at Gunpoint

24-year-old Ashleigh Johnson of Kellyville, Australia placed an ad to sell a Chihuahua puppy. An unnamed 26-year-old woman who responded to the ad went to Johnson's home and met the puppy named Diego. While the woman was holding the dog, she pulled a gun and said she "needed love" and was taking the puppy without paying the $1500 price. Johnson's father, a security guard, grabbed the gun. Johnson's brother, a police officer, helped to restrain the woman until she could be arrested. Diego was not harmed and is still for sale.

Rescuing a Parrot with a Cherry Picker

A 13-year-old macaw flew 50 feet up into a tree and was too scared to fly down. Emma Hooper of Botley, England believes that Cleo flew away because she was distressed at moving to a new home. When the RSPCA refused to come, Hooper called to rent a hydraulic lift, but was told it wouldn't be available until the next day. Hooper stayed by the tree all night long. The cherry picker arrived at 7:30 AM, and Cleo was finally brought down. She had spent 16 hours on the same branch.

"Hitler's Skull" Belongs to Woman

Recent DNA tests show that the skull purported to belong to Adolf Hitler is not his. Hitler committed suicide in 1945. His remains were burned the next day by the Russian Army. One year later, bone fragments were recovered from the site and kept by Russian authorities until they were cremated in 1970, with the exception of a piece of the skull, which showed a bullet hole. American scientists who examined the bone found it to be suspiciously small. DNA tests revealed that the skull is from a woman. It is not believed to belong to Hitler's wife Eva Braun because there was no evidence that she was shot.

Fat Skunk Put on Diet

A skunk named Mr. Bumble was turned over to the RSPCA when his owners could no longer handle him. The skunk weighed in at 14 pounds! It is thought that his love, described as an "addiction," to bacon sandwiches is to blame. Mr. Bumble is now at Tropiquaria Animal Park in Watchet, England and is on a vegetarian diet. The regimen includes long walks as well.

It Pays to Dress Nicely for Court

Robbery suspect Ronald Tackman walked out of a Manhattan courthouse before his hearing Wednesday morning. He hasn't been seen since. He had left a holding area and went behind a courtroom. A security guard saw him in his business suit and let him out, assuming he was a lawyer. The 54-year-old Tackman had escaped jail once before, in the 1980s.

Dwarf Village is a Theme Park

120 little people live in a village near Kunming, China. The village was set up to protect the dwarves from discrimination. You can't live there if you are over 4 feet 3 inches tall.
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Now the group has turned itself into a tourist attraction by building mushroom houses and living and dressing like fairy tale characters.
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"As small people we are used to being pushed around and exploited by big people. But here there aren't any big people and everything we do is for us," said spokesman Fu Tien.

Sports Announcer's Goofy Prediction Comes True

Seattle Mariners color commentator Mike Blowers was asked to make a prediction about the Mariners matchup with the Toronto Blue Jays. Blowers got very specific and said that 1. rookie Matt Tuiasosopo would hit his first home run since joining the majors, 2. the hit would come in a 3-1 count, 3. off a fastball 4. in the second inning, and that 5. the ball would land in the second deck. Four of the five predictions came true! The ball barely missed the second deck.

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Little Baby's Ice Cream
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Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
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Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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travel
Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
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iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

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