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Classic Feynman Physics Lectures Free Online, Courtesy of Bill Gates

Back in July, Microsoft introduced Project Tuva, an online video player which will eventually host a variety of science content, free for all. The player is indeed very nice, allowing users to take notes onscreen while watching, enabling optional expert commentary, and showing closed captioning throughout. The only catch is that you have to install the Microsoft Silverlight browser plugin (similar to Adobe's Flash plugin) -- it's free, and you might already have it installed (it's also used for popular video features like Netflix Streaming).

So Project Tuva starts with the Messenger Lectures by Richard Feynman, a classic lecture series about physics aimed as a general audience, delivered in 1964 and later published as a book called The Character of Physical Law. The lectures introduce a variety of basic physics principles, and are similar to what you'd get as an incoming student at college -- except they're delivered by Richard Feynman, famous for his wit as well as his science chops. Anyway, without further ado, here's the link: Richard Feynman's Messenger Lectures. I've also included a brief intro from Bill Gates below, just to pump you up before getting your science hat on.

Once again, the link to the lectures: Richard Feynman's Messenger Lectures. If you don't want to just start on the first lecture like everybody else, I recommend the fourth lecture: Symmetry in Physical Law.

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Sylke Rohrlach, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0
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Animals
These Strange Sea Spiders Breathe Through Their Legs
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Sylke Rohrlach, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0

We know that humans breathe through their lungs and fish breathe through their gills—but where exactly does that leave sea spiders?

Though they might appear to share much in common with land spiders, sea spiders are not actually arachnids. And, by extension, they don't circulate blood and oxygen the way you'd expect them to, either.

A new study from Current Biology found that these leggy sea dwellers (marine arthropods of the class Pycnogonida) use their external skeleton to take in oxygen. Or, more specifically: They use their legs. The sea spider contracts its legs—which contain its guts—to pump oxygen through its body.

Somehow, these sea spiders hardly take the cake for Strangest Spider Alive (especially because they're not actually spiders); check out, for instance, our round-up of the 10 strangest spiders, and watch the video from National Geographic below:

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iStock
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Food
How to Make Perfect Fried Chicken, According to Chemistry
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iStock

Cooking amazing fried chicken isn’t just art—it’s also chemistry. Learn the science behind the sizzle by watching the American Chemical Society’s latest "Reactions" video below.

Host Kyle Nackers explains the three important chemical processes that occur as your bird browns in the skillet—hydrolysis, oxidation, and polymerization—and he also provides expert-backed cooking hacks to help you whip up the perfect picnic snack.

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