10 Things You Might Not Know About Freddie Mercury

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

On September 5, 1946, the man who would become known as Freddie Mercury was born. In honor of what would have been his 72nd birthday—and just ahead of the November release of Bohemian Rhapsody, Bryan Singer's long-awaited biopic—here are 10 things you might not have known about the Queen frontman.

1. HIS BIRTH NAME WAS FARROKH BULSARA.

Farrokh Bulsara started going by Freddie when he was at St. Peter's, a boarding school for boys near Mumbai. He legally changed his name to Freddie Mercury around 1970, when Queen was formed.

2. HE WAS BORN IN ZANZIBAR.

Mercury was born in Stone Town, Zanzibar (now Tanzania). His family moved there so that his dad could continue his career at the British Colonial Office. He grew up between Zanzibar and India before moving to Middlesex, England when he was a teenager.

3. HE AND HIS FAMILY PRACTICED ZOROASTRIANISM.

Mercury and family were Parsis and practiced Zoroastrian, one of the world's oldest monotheistic religions. Even though he hadn't practiced in years, his funeral was performed by a Zoroastrian priest.

4. HE HAD A RECORDED RANGE OF ALMOST FOUR OCTAVES.

Mariah Carey claims five, for some perspective. When he spoke he was more of a baritone, but majority of his singing fell in the tenor range. In 2016, a team of scientists decided to study Mercury's voice. Among the many facts they concluded was that Mercury's vocal cords moved faster than the average person's. "While a typical vibrato will fluctuate between 5.4 Hz and 6.9 Hz, Mercury’s was 7.04 Hz," Consequence of Sound reported.

5. HE DESIGNED THE QUEEN EMBLEM, A.K.A. THE QUEEN CREST.

Thanks to a degree in art and graphic design from Ealing Art College, Mercury was able to just more than be the face of the band—he also helped to brand them. The crest he designed for the band is made of the zodiac signs of the whole band—two Leo lions for John Deacon and Roger Taylor, a Cancer crab for Brian May, and two fairies to represent Freddie's Virgo sign. The "Q" and the crown represent the band name, of course, and a phoenix protects the whole thing.

6. HE WAS REPORTEDLY VERY SHY.

Although he known for his wild, outgoing antics on stage, most people who knew Mercury personally said he was very shy in his personal life, which is one of the reasons he very rarely granted interviews. "In real life nobody knew Freddie," bandmate Roger Taylor once said. "He was shy, gentle and kind. He was never the one, he was on the stage.”

7. HE REVEALED THAT HE HAD AIDS JUST ONE DAY BEFORE HE DIED.

Mercury and his manager issued a statement confirming that he had AIDS the very day before he died. It had been widely speculated for a couple of years due to his gaunt appearance and Queen's sudden lack of touring. Some people were very upset by this delayed statement, saying that an earlier announcement could have raised a vast amount of money for the cause.

8. HE WAS A DEVOTED CAT LOVER.

He loved cats and had as many as 10 at one point. He even had an album and a song dedicated to his cats (Mr. Bad Guy). He wrote a song about his favorite cat, Delilah. Here's a bit of it:

Delilah, Delilah, oh my, oh my, oh my - you're irresistible
You make me smile when I'm just about to cry
You bring me hope, you make me laugh - you like it
You get away with murder, so innocent
But when you throw a moody you're all claws and you bite -
That's alright !
Delilah, Delilah, oh my, oh my, oh my - you're unpredictable
You make me so very happy
When you cuddle up and go to sleep beside me
And then you make me slightly mad
When you pee all over my Chippendale Suite

9. THE "BOTTOMLESS MIC" WAS AMONG HIS MANY TRADEMARKS.

Here's how that happened: early in Queen's career, he was apparently mid-show when his mic stand snapped in half. Instead of having it replaced, Freddie just used it as-is. He must have liked it, because he used the mic "stick" from then on.

10. HE WORKED AS A BAG HANDLER AT HEATHROW.

Long before he became one of the most celebrated singes in music history, Mercury held a slightly less glamorous position: baggage handler at Heathrow Airport. To celebrate Mercury's 72nd birthday, several of British Airways's Heathrow baggage handlers took time out of their day on September 5, 2018 to entertain travelers with a choreographed tribute to their former co-worker.

An earlier version of this article ran in 2009.

Can You Find the 30 Album Covers Referenced in This Picture?

Norman Records
Norman Records

Album covers were once a respected art form and representation of a band’s identity. Now, after more than a decade of music being readily available online, they can be more of an afterthought.

In tribute to this dying art form, online vinyl retailer Norman Records has created a fun visual quiz featuring some of the most iconic album covers of all time. (Hint: Most are classic rock albums, but there are a few that fall into different genres.)

Check out the interactive image below, and use your cursor to hover over any areas you’d like to enlarge. Once you give up, keep scrolling to reveal the answers.

How many did you get? Some, like David Bowie’s Aladdin Sane and Led Zeppelin’s self-titled album, are fairly obvious. Other references are a little more obscure (any Neutral Milk Hotel fans?).

If this quiz has you feeling musically inspired, check out these stories behind 22 classic album covers, including Nirvana’s Nevermind, Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon, and the Grateful Dead’s Skull and Roses.

Dolly Parton, They Might Be Giants, and More Featured on New Album Inspired By the 27 Amendments

Valerie Macon, Getty Images
Valerie Macon, Getty Images

Since 2016, Radiolab's More Perfect podcast has taken what is typically viewed as a dry subject, the Supreme Court, and turned it into an engrossing podcast. Now, fans of the show have a whole new way to learn about the parts of U.S. history which textbooks tend to gloss over. 27, The Most Perfect Album, a new music compilation from Radiolab, features more than two dozen songs inspired by each of the 27 amendments to the U.S. Constitution, from freedom of religion to rules regulating changes to Congressional salaries.

More Perfect assembled an impressive roster of musical talents to compose and perform the tracklist. They Might Be Giants wrote the song for the Third Amendment, which prohibited the forced quartering of soldiers in people's homes. It goes, "But the presence of so many friendly strangers makes me nervous, and it does not mean that I'm not truly thankful for your service."

For the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote, Dolly Parton sings, "We carried signs, we cursed the times, marched up and down the street. We had to fight for women's rights with blisters on our feet." Less sexy amendments, like the 12th Amendment, which revised presidential election procedures, and the 20th Amendment, which set commencement terms for congress and the president, are also featured. Torres, Caroline Shaw, Kash Doll, and Cherry Glazerr are just a handful of the other artists who contributed to the album.

The release of the compilation coincides with the premiere of More Perfect's third season, which will focus on the 27 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. You can check out the first episode of the new season today and download the companion album for free through WNYC.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER