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The Weekend Links

A great find from my friend Ryan - hysterical Cleveland tourism videos. If the first take doesn't have you loving Cleveland, than the second definitely will. Remember the Cleveland motto: Hey, at least we're not Detroit! Any Cleveland denizens out there care to rebut?
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Learn your pre-history with the Paleobet - a really cute and informative paleontological alphabet!
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If you ding a parked car, you leave a note. But what if you burglarize one?
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Some extremely creative grave markers. Are some of these photoshopped? Maybe I'm just a cynic!
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Need to get away for awhile? Try being like the invisible man, and just become part of the scenery.
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Dating can be difficult and awkward, but how much more awkward is a Skype date? One brave columnist dared to find out (complete with video clips).
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You know what they say about hindsight being 20/20 ... here are 5 disasters that could have been avoided. Let's hope history doesn't repeat itself on some of these!
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Utter poppycock - was there indeed a literary hoax so highbrow no one got it? In Twitter speak this would be followed by the hashtag #FAIL.
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Another life lesson: don't park where you aren't supposed to - one day you'll pay!

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Off the wall: The astonishing 3D murals painted on the sides of buildings by a trompe l'oeil artist. These are different from the sidewalk chalkings that get passed around from time to time. Some of them took SEVERAL hard looks to figure out!
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From Daniel, a ridiculous clip (not the trailer) from the film "Mega Shark versus Giant Octopus." It features the clip where the shark bites the plane in mid-air. Yeah. Well, it IS a mega shark!
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In the mood for murder? Rediscover some of the Top 20 Gangster Movies of the Last 40 Years
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Rather lovely - exquisite umbrellas to brighten up dull rainy days (and lighten your wallet, too).
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Step right up and buy some amazing healing snake oil elixir. I can't believe it still exists!
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Er, Sauron? Is that you? Spiral galaxy found with black hole for an "eye."
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An interesting find from the National Library of Medicine: Dream Anatomy. "Dream Anatomy shows off the anatomical imagination in some of its most astonishing incarnations, from 1500 to the present."
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Did you know that if you zap garlic cloves in the microwave for 15 seconds and the skins slip right off? Or if you poke an egg with a small sewing needle before hard-boiling, and the egg will peel with ease? How about the fact that cottage cheese will remain fresher longer if you store it upside down in the refrigerator? Check out some of these kitchen hints.
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Can the complexities of genetics be summed up in one simple black and white picture? Apparently so.
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Some organizational tips from Life Hacker: Turn Gmail Into Your Ultimate GTD (Get Things Done) Inbox.
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Hope everyone has a splendid weekend! Just don't forget to keep sending in those links - refer all sites, blogs, pictures and all manner of internet oddities to FlossyLinks@gmail.com, and for link extras during the week, I am on Twitter.

[Last Weekend's Links]

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Animals
Why Tiny 'Hedgehog Highways' Are Popping Up Around London
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Hedgehogs as pets have gained popularity in recent years, but in many parts of the world, they're still wild animals. That includes London, where close to a million of the creatures roam streets, parks, and gardens, seeking out wood and vegetation to take refuge in. Now, Atlas Obscura reports that animal activists are transforming the city into a more hospitable environment for hedgehogs.

Barnes Hedgehogs, a group founded by Michel Birkenwald in the London neighborhood of Barnes four years ago, is responsible for drilling tiny "hedgehog highways" through walls around London. The passages are just wide enough for the animals to climb through, making it easier for them to travel from one green space to the next.

London's wild hedgehog population has seen a sharp decline in recent decades. Though it's hard to pin down accurate numbers for the elusive animals, surveys have shown that the British population has dwindled by tens of millions since the 1950s. This is due to factors like human development and habitat destruction by farmers who aren't fond of the unattractive shrubs, hedges, and dead wood that hedgehogs use as their homes.

When such environments are left to grow, they can still be hard for hedgehogs to access. Carving hedgehog highways through the stone partitions and wooden fences bordering parks and gardens is one way Barnes Hedgehogs is making life in the big city a little easier for its most prickly residents.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

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Big Questions
Where Should You Place the Apostrophe in President's Day?
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Happy Presidents’ Day! Or is it President’s Day? Or Presidents Day? What you call the national holiday depends on where you are, who you’re honoring, and how you think we’re celebrating.

Saying "President’s Day" infers that the day belongs to a singular president, such as George Washington or Abraham Lincoln, whose birthdays are the basis for the holiday. On the other hand, referring to it as "Presidents’ Day" means that the day belongs to all of the presidents—that it’s their day collectively. Finally, calling the day "Presidents Day"—plural with no apostrophe—would indicate that we’re honoring all POTUSes past and present (yes, even Andrew Johnson), but that no one president actually owns the day.

You would think that in the nearly 140 years since "Washington’s Birthday" was declared a holiday in 1879, someone would have officially declared a way to spell the day. But in fact, even the White House itself hasn’t chosen a single variation for its style guide. They spelled it “President’s Day” here and “Presidents’ Day” here.


Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Maybe that indecision comes from the fact that Presidents Day isn’t even a federal holiday. The federal holiday is technically still called “Washington’s Birthday,” and states can choose to call it whatever they want. Some states, like Iowa, don’t officially acknowledge the day at all. And the location of the punctuation mark is a moot point when individual states choose to call it something else entirely, like “George Washington’s Birthday and Daisy Gatson Bates Day” in Arkansas, or “Birthdays of George Washington/Thomas Jefferson” in Alabama. (Alabama loves to split birthday celebrations, by the way; the third Monday in January celebrates both Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert E. Lee.)

You can look to official grammar sources to declare the right way, but even they don’t agree. The AP Stylebook prefers “Presidents Day,” while Chicago Style uses “Presidents’ Day.”

The bottom line: There’s no rhyme or reason to any of it. Go with what feels right. And even then, if you’re in one of those states that has chosen to spell it “President’s Day”—Washington, for example—and you use one of the grammar book stylings instead, you’re still technically wrong.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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