10 Guys Who Have Rocked a Toupee

David Rosenblum/Getty Images
David Rosenblum/Getty Images

Phil Spector shocked the world last week—not when he was found guilty of murder, but when he appeared in his prison photo without his wig. Although Spector might be the creepiest, he's definitely not the only man in entertainment to wear a toupee or a hairpiece. Here are 10 others.

1. TED DANSON


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Dnson has been wearing a toupee for years and even poked fun of it in an episode of Cheers when it surfaced that Sam Malone had a little help with his lush head of hair. Danson reportedly only wears the wig for movies and T.V. shows and doesn't mind showing his thinning hair otherwise.

2. FRANK SINATRA


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Ol' Blue Eyes wore toupees for years, according to the man who worked on his hair for movies like The Manchurian Candidate. "He used to have some exceptionally good hairpieces," Jerry Roman said. "But later on he got very sloppy. In his last five years he went into a synthetic piece which really did not look very natural."

3. JOHN WAYNE


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The actor wore a toupee from about 1948 on. But he never denied it, and in fact made a joke about it when a reported once asked him about his "phony" toupee. "It's not phony," he responded. "It's real hair. Of course, it's not mine, but it's real."

4. HUMPHREY BOGART


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Bogie wore a toupee but was never seen without it in public. His lover was a wig-maker who worked with Hollywood icons Ray Milland and Gary Cooper before she caught Bogie's eye.

5. BURT REYNOLDS


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Reynolds may have been in the closet about his toupee for years, but when he filed for bankruptcy, his unsettled accounts included $121,796.62 owed to Edward Katz Hair Design. When the court documents were made public, the Katz was out of the bag, so to speak.

6. HOWARD COSELL

According to his Washington Post obituary, wore a toupee for all of his public appearances, which was revealed when Muhammad Ali lifted it off of his head while they were live on the air in the 1960s.

7. SEAN CONNERY


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He's obviously a dashing bald man these days, but he's actually been that way since the 007 days. 

8. BING CROSBY


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Crosby wore a hairpiece for all of his movies, but in his later years, he hated wearing the toupee so much he started specifically picking out roles that had him wearing hats or nightcaps. His baldness became well-known when he decided to go toupee-less during the USO tours of WWII.

9. JIMMY STEWART


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Stewart started wearing a toupee in the early 1950's, but made it less obvious by making it a gray one. It wasn't uncommon for him to go without in public, though.

10. BEN AFFLECK


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The elder Affleck brother may or may not wear a toupee. A rumor began circulating a few years ago that Affleck and Vince Vaughn were wrestling around at a party, you know, like boys sometimes do, and Affleck's toupee supposedly wasn't secured and flipped back in front of several Hollywood notables. He swore them all to secrecy, but it leaked anyway. He has since denied it. What do you think?

Of course, these are just the tip of the iceberg. Other suspects include Marv Albert, Errol Flynn, Donald Trump (although most people who have seen him close up think it's probably just a spectacular combover), Hank Williams, Jeremy Piven, Nicolas Cage, John Travolta, William Shatner and Mel Gibson. Are there more that belong on the list? Let us know in the comments.

8 Sequels That Received Oscar Nominations for Best Picture

Jasin Boland, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
Jasin Boland, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

It’s rare when a movie sequel manages to stand up to the original entry in a film series. Even rarer? When a sequel is so good that it nabs an Oscars nomination for Best Picture. Here are eight movies that did just that.

1. Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)

When Mad Max: Fury Road was released in theaters in 2015, no one thought that it would be a critical darling—or an awards contender . But when the Academy Award nominations were announced in 2016, the latest entry in George Miller’s Mad Max franchise earned a whopping 10 nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director. Fury Road is the fourth installment in the series and was the first to hit theaters in 30 years (since the release of 1985’s Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome). It’s also the first movie in the franchise to receive any recognition from the Academy.

2. Toy Story 3 (2010)

A still from 'Toy Story 3' (2010)
Disney/Pixar

In 2011, Toy Story 3 was nominated for five Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Animated Feature. Though The King’s Speech ended up taking the night’s top prize, Toy Story 3 (which was named Best Animated Feature) made history that night, as it was the third ever animated movie to score a Best Picture nod; 1991’s Beauty and the Beast and 2009’s Up are the other two films to earn the same accolade.

3. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

Although the first two installments in The Lord of the Rings trilogy—2001’s The Fellowship of the Ring and 2002’s The Two Towers—were each nominated for Best Picture, it was the final movie that ended up winning the Academy Award in 2004. In fact, The Return of the King won 11 Oscars that year, sweeping every category in which it was nominated, and tying Ben-Hur and Titanic for the most awards received in one night.

4. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002)

In 2003, The Two Towers won two of the six Oscars for which it was nominated, for Best Sound Editing and Best Visual Effects. Rob Marshall’s musical Chicago beat it out for Best Picture.  

5. The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter in 'The Silence of the Lambs' (1991)
20th Century Fox Home Entertainment

In 1992, The Silence of the Lambs made a clean sweep of the “Big Five” categories: Best Picture, Best Director for Jonathan Demme, Best Actor for Sir Anthony Hopkins, Best Actress for Jodie Foster, and Best Adapted Screenplay for Ted Tally. Although The Silence of the Lambs isn’t a direct sequel to Michael Mann’s 1986 film Manhunter, it’s based on the sequel novel to author Thomas Harris’s Red Dragon, on which Manhunter was based. It also features the character Hannibal Lecter in a major role, who was played by Brian Cox in Manhunter—before Hopkins made the role his own. Got that?

6. The Godfather: Part III (1990)

Though it’s often considered the far inferior film in The Godfather trilogy, The Godfather: Part III received seven Academy Award nominations in 1991, including Best Picture and Best Director for Francis Ford Coppola. Ultimately, it lost to Kevin Costner’s Dances with Wolves, making it the only installment in The Godfather Saga not to win a Best Picture Oscar.

7. The Godfather: Part II (1974)

Al Pacino in 'The Godfather: Part II' (1974)
Paramount Pictures

In 1975, The Godfather: Part II became the first sequel in Oscar history to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. It won the coveted award two years after the original film was named Best Picture. The sequel was nominated for a total of 11 Oscars, with three separate nominations in the Best Supporting Actor category alone: one for Michael Vincenzo Gazzo (who played Frankie Pentangeli) and Lee Strasberg (as Hyman Roth), and one for Robert De Niro, who took home the statuette for playing the younger version of Vito Corleone.

8. The Bells of St. Mary's (1945)

Though it lost Best Picture to Billy Wilder’s The Lost Weekend at the 1946 Oscars, The Bells of St. Mary’s is the first movie sequel to be nominated for the Academy’s biggest prize. The film is a sequel to Leo McCarey’s previous film, 1944’s Going My Way, which won the Oscar for Best Picture a year earlier. While Going My Way and The Bells of St. Mary’s feature different stories and casts, Bing Crosby stars in both movies as Father Chuck O'Malley.

An earlier version of this article ran in 2016.

Hasbro Is Releasing a Stranger Things-Themed Dungeons & Dragons Starter Kit

The Demogorgon is coming, and only you can stop it. You can now join Eleven, Mike, Dustin, Lucas, and Will in the Upside Down when you play the new Stranger Things-themed Dungeons & Dragons game, spotted by Geek Tyrant. Hasbro and Wizards of the Coast have taken a classic board game and revamped it for fans of the original, as well as younger Stranger Things viewers who might not have played the game before.

The starter set comes with an adventure book, character sheets, dice, two Demogorgon figurines (including one that can be painted and customized), and a detailed guide outlining how to play the game. Players will have the chance to choose between characters like Will the Wise and Dustin the Dwarf as they embark on a quest to find the Thessalhydra monster. Both the Thessalhydra and Demogorgon are creatures that actually appeared in the Dungeons & Dragons games of the ‘70s and ‘80s, but the new Hasbro game’s theme—titled "Hunt for the Thessalhydra"—is based on the adventure invented by Mike’s character in season 1 of Stranger Things.

“Get your fireballs ready as you investigate the mysterious castle and battle the ferocious Demogorgon,” Hasbro writes in its description of the game, which is suitable for people aged 14 and up. Packaged in a retro, worn-looking box, the game is now available on Amazon for $25.

In the meantime, fans are still anxiously awaiting the Netflix release of Stranger Things season 3 this Fourth of July. The new eight-episode season promises to be the "grossest" one yet, with plenty of ‘80s-inspired scares to go around (including the return of the Mind Flayer, or Shadow Monster).

[h/t Geek Tyrant]

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