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7 Names Inspired By Poetry

From Shakespeare to Sylvia Plath, Gilgamesh to Dylan, poets have left an indelible mark on our culture. Let's take a look at a few famous things named after poets and their works as we explore the awesome influence of poetry in modern culture.

1. The Evangeline Trail
Along the coast of Nova Scotia winds the striking Evangeline Trail, a path through some of North America's oldest European settlements, spanning almost 400 years of culture and natural beauty. It was christened for the title character in Evangeline, A Tale of Acadie, a poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. On this track, you can speed along 181 miles of coastline through villages and forts and finally hop on a ferry to the eastern edge of Maine. Driving in dactylic hexameter is optional.

2. The Baltimore Ravens
The NFL team currently residing in Baltimore is actually named for Edgar Allen Poe's The Raven. I can only imagine the quote "What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore / meant in croaking `Nevermore'" is some vague allusion to Ray Lewis during a night club confrontation.

3. Your Achilles' Heel

Achilles had it all. Greek hero? Check. Awesome fighting skills? Check. Most handsome fighter aligned against Troy? Double check. Invincibility? Well, almost. Legend had it that his mother dipped him in the river Styx as a baby, granting him invulnerability except for an area on his ankle where she lowered him into the waters. My mother tried something similar with me: she listened to Styx non-stop when I was in the womb. (All I received were weak knees and chronic asthma.)

The common misconception is that Achilles' death (and hence the origin of the phrase Achilles' Heel) appears in Homer's Iliad. It did not. However, this tale actually made several appearances in other ancient Greek and Roman mythical poetry and, in 1693, a Flemish and Dutch anatomist by the name of Philip Verheyen first designated the tendon in the back of the ankle for ancient hero.

4. FLW's Favorite Statue
Richard Brock, an artist who worked closely with Frank Lloyd Wright, created a statue depicting the muse of architecture constructing a spire from geometric building blocks. Named for an Alfred, Lord Tennyson poem, Flower In The Crannied Wall still remains at Wright's home in Spring Green, Wisconsin. It was one of Wright's favorite statues, although in recent years it has fallen into slight disrepair.

5. Clipper Ships & Whisky
Robert Burns' poem Tam o' Shanter is a tale of drinking, morality, desire and relationships in general. Written in a combination of English and Scots, the main character is drawn to Nannie Dee, a dancing witch with a Cutty-sark (a blouse or undergarment) much too small for her. Overcome with attraction, he eventually cries out, "Weel done, Cutty-sark." It's a powerful metaphor for lust and regret.

Perfect name for a whisky, right? Actually, the whisky takes it's name from the last merchant clipper ship ever constructed, The Cutty-Sark. Launched in 1869, it had Nannie Dee as her figurehead.

6. What Dreams May Come
The 1998 film What Dreams May Come was based on the novel by Richard Matheson. The title itself appears as a line in one of the most famous soliloquies from Shakespeare, Hamlet's "To be, or not to be":

For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil

If you have happened across this visually stunning movie about life, death, the soul and the afterlife, you know how well the title fits.

7. The Baudelaire Family
French poet Charles Pierre Baudelaire was a bit of a sensationalist or, at the very least, a provocateur during his lifetime. Check out this quote about his views on pleasure:

Personally, I think that the unique and supreme delight lies in the certainty of doing 'evil' -- and men and women know from birth that all pleasure lies in evil.

We'll go ahead and call him the anti-Google. But for those of you familiar with the 13 books in A Series of Unfortunate Events, you may recognize the surname. The Baudelaire family are the protagonists.
* * * * *
We've obviously just scratched the surface. What are some other examples of media, architecture or geography named for poems or poets?

[Image courtesy of Pedal & Sea Adventures.]

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10 Things You Might Not Know About Little Women
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Louisa May Alcott's Little Women is one of the world's most beloved novels, and now—nearly 150 years after its original publication—it's capturing yet another generation of readers, thanks in part to Masterpiece's new small-screen adaptation. Whether it's been days or years since you've last read it, here are 10 things you might not know about Alcott's classic tale of family and friendship.

1. LOUISA MAY ALCOTT DIDN'T WANT TO WRITE LITTLE WOMEN.


Frank T. Merrill, Public Domain, Courtesy of The Project Gutenberg

Louisa May Alcott was writing both literature and pulp fiction (sample title: Pauline's Passion and Punishment) when Thomas Niles, the editor at Roberts Brothers Publishing, approached her about writing a book for girls. Alcott said she would try, but she wasn’t all that interested, later calling such books “moral pap for the young.”

When it became clear Alcott was stalling, Niles offered a publishing contract to her father, Bronson Alcott. Although Bronson was a well-known thinker who was friends with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, his work never achieved much acclaim. When it became clear that Bronson would have an opportunity to publish a new book if Louisa started her girls' story, she caved in to the pressure.

2. LITTLE WOMEN TOOK JUST 10 WEEKS TO WRITE.


Frank T. Merrill, Public Domain, Courtesy of The Project Gutenberg

Alcott began writing the book in May 1868. She worked on it day and night, becoming so consumed with it that she sometimes forgot to eat or sleep. On July 15, she sent all 402 pages to her editor. In September, a mere four months after starting the book, Little Women was published. It became an instant best seller and turned Alcott into a rich and famous woman.

3. THE BOOK AS WE KNOW IT WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN TWO PARTS.


Frank T. Merrill, Public Domain, Courtesy of The Project Gutenberg

The first half was published in 1868 as Little Women: Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy. The Story Of Their Lives. A Girl’s Book. It ended with John Brooke proposing marriage to Meg. In 1869, Alcott published Good Wives, the second half of the book. It, too, only took a few months to write.

4. MEG, BETH, AND AMY WERE BASED ON ALCOTT'S SISTERS.


Frank T. Merrill, Public Domain, Courtesy of The Project Gutenberg

Meg was based on Louisa’s sister Anna, who fell in love with her husband John Bridge Pratt while performing opposite him in a play. The description of Meg’s wedding in the novel is supposedly based on Anna’s actual wedding.

Beth was based on Lizzie, who died from scarlet fever at age 23. Like Beth, Lizzie caught the illness from a poor family her mother was helping.

Amy was based on May (Amy is an anagram of May), an artist who lived in Europe. In fact, May—who died in childbirth at age 39—was the first woman to exhibit paintings in the Paris Salon.

Jo, of course, is based on Alcott herself.

5. LIKE THE MARCH FAMILY, THE ALCOTTS KNEW POVERTY.


Frank T. Merrill, Public Domain, Courtesy of The Project Gutenberg

Bronson Alcott’s philosophical ideals made it difficult for him to find employment—for example, as a socialist, he wouldn't work for wages—so the family survived on handouts from friends and neighbors. At times during Louisa’s childhood, there was nothing to eat but bread, water, and the occasional apple.

When she got older, Alcott worked as a paid companion and governess, like Jo does in the novel, and sold “sensation” stories to help pay the bills. She also took on menial jobs, working as a seamstress, a laundress, and a servant. Even as a child, Alcott wanted to help her family escape poverty, something Little Women made possible.

6. ALCOTT REFUSED TO HAVE JO MARRY LAURIE.


Frank T. Merrill, Public Domain, Courtesy of The Project Gutenberg

Alcott, who never married herself, wanted Jo to remain unmarried, too. But while she was working on the second half of Little Women, fans were clamoring for Jo to marry the boy next door, Laurie. “Girls write to ask who the little women marry, as if that was the only aim and end of a woman’s life," Alcott wrote in her journal. "I won’t marry Jo to Laurie to please anyone.”

As a compromise—or to spite her fans—Alcott married Jo to the decidedly unromantic Professor Bhaer. Laurie ends up with Amy.

7. THERE ARE LOTS OF THEORIES ABOUT WHO LAURIE WAS BASED ON.


Frank T. Merrill, Public Domain, Courtesy of The Project Gutenberg

People have theorized Laurie was inspired by everyone from Thoreau to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s son Julian, but this doesn’t seem to be the case. In 1865, while in Europe, Alcott met a Polish musician named Ladislas Wisniewski, whom Alcott nicknamed Laddie. The flirtation between Laddie and Alcott culminated in them spending two weeks together in Paris, alone. According to biographer Harriet Reisen, Alcott later modeled Laurie after Laddie.

How far did the Alcott/Laddie affair go? It’s hard to say, as Alcott later crossed out the section of her diary referring to the romance. In the margin, she wrote, “couldn’t be.”

8. YOU CAN STILL VISIT ORCHARD HOUSE, WHERE ALCOTT WROTE LITTLE WOMEN.

Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts was the Alcott family home. In 1868, Louisa reluctantly left her Boston apartment to write Little Women there. Today, you can tour this house and see May’s drawings on the walls, as well as the small writing desk that Bronson built for Louisa to use.

9. LITTLE WOMEN HAS BEEN ADAPTED A NUMBER OF TIMES.

In addition to a 1958 TV series, multiple Broadway plays, a musical, a ballet, and an opera, Little Women has been made into more than a half-dozen movies. The most famous are the 1933 version starring Katharine Hepburn, the 1949 version starring June Allyson (with Elizabeth Taylor as Amy), and the 1994 version starring Winona Ryder. Later this year, Clare Niederpruem's modern retelling of the story is scheduled to arrive in movie theaters. It's also been adapted for the small screen a number of times, most recently for PBS's Masterpiece, by Call the Midwife creator Heidi Thomas.

10. IN 1980, A JAPANESE ANIME VERSION OF LITTLE WOMEN WAS RELEASED.

In 1987, Japan made an anime version of Little Women that ran for 48 half-hour episodes. Watch the first two episodes above.

Additional Resources:
Louisa May Alcott: A Personal Biography; Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women; Louisa May Alcott's Journals; Little Women; Alcott Film; C-Span; LouisaMayAlcott.org.

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LaGuardia Airport Is Serving Up Personalized Short Stories to Passengers
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In between purchasing a neck pillow and a bag full of snacks, guests flying out of the Marine Air Terminal at New York City's LaGuardia Airport can now order up an impromptu short story. As Hyperallergic reports, Landing Pages is an art project that connects writers to travelers looking for short fiction written in the time it takes to reach their destination.

The kiosk was set up as part of the ArtPort Residency, a new collaboration between the Queens Council on the Arts and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which sponsors different art projects at the Marine Air Terminal for a few months at a time.

Artists Lexie Smith and Gideon Jacobs set up the inaugural project at the terminal earlier this month. To request a story from Landing Pages, travelers can visit the kiosk and leave their flight number and contact information. While the passenger is in the air, Smith and Jacobs churn out a custom story, in the form of poetry, illustration, or prose, from their airport terminal workspace and send it out in time for it to reach the reader's phone before he or she lands.

The word count depends on the duration of the flight, and the subject matter often touches upon themes of travel and adventure. As Smith and Jacobs continue their residency through June 30, the pieces they complete will be made available at Landingpages.nyc and in hard copy form at the airport kiosk.

Landing Pages isn't the first airport service to offer à la carte short stories. In 2011, a French startup debuted its short story-dispensing vending machine at Paris's Charles de Gaulle Airport. Those stories come in three categories—one-minute, three-minute, and five-minute reads—and are printed out immediately so travelers can read them during their flight.

[h/t Hyperallergic]

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