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The Weekend Links

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Many would argue the penny is useless. And maybe it is, as far as currency is concerned. But pennies can still be used for other amusing exploits. Dollar bills can also make for some intriguing art thanks to a laser and what I would imagine is a lot of time.
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20 Amazing Examples of Art from Obsolete Technology

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With color, there's always more than meets the eye. Exposure and response to certain colors have been know to alter behavior.
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Nostradamus may have gotten a prediction or two right, but he's got nothin' on Back to the Future Part II, and here are eleven reasons why.
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Consumers fight back! Customer Beats Robber with Ladder. First there was Superman, then Spiderman and now ... Caveman!
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I have two addictions, TV and chocolate (see what I did there?). But in all seriousness, regarding the latter, I'm not sure how I feel about this "Cocoa Pipe" that lets you literally inhale chocolate. Is it friend or foe?
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I am Guilty Citizen Number One when it comes to leaving computers on overnight, but as Jan has brought to our attention, there are 2.8 billion reasons not to.
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Conspiracy Corner: Was There A Curse Surrounding President Lincoln's Assassination? It seems those around him met similarly strange fates ....

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Yes Easter has come and gone and candy is cheap, but if you love Peeps you might enjoy learning how to make them from scratch. (Thanks Erin!)
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I don't know the who, what, when, where, why or how about this ... but I like it.

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Bohemian 8-bit Rhapsody will either amuse you or irritate you for infinity. Apparently there's a cult following for 8-bit songs, some of which they play in the middle of the night on 91.1 here in Atlanta when I'm too tired to fight back.
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Just because you're a genius doesn't mean you're a nice guy (or gal ... but in this case, guy). Here are five examples of smart guys who you might not have wanted to be friends with.
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Ok, bear with me. I'm including this link beyond the purpose of minor amusement and rather for the fact that it has its own website. I mean there is a URL devoted entirely to describing this one picture. What a world!
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Curious about that yogurt? Looking sideways at that jar of tomato sauce? Not sure if that fruit is supposed to be that color? Check out the handy Shelf Life Guide.
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I hope it's ok for me to post this, because it's amazing in so many ways ... full length Nick nostalgia shows to occupy hours of your time.
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For anyone curious, this comic pretty much sums up part of the behind-the-scenes action of me doing the Weekend Links.
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Casts don't have to be ugly. In fact, they can be beautiful and informative. And here I thought just having a colored cast was hip.

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I hope everyone has a resplendent weekend, and that wherever you are Spring has finally reached you! Keep sending in great links, blogs and pics to FlossyLinks@gmail.com.

[Last Weekend's Links]

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images
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science
6 Radiant Facts About Irène Joliot-Curie
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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Though her accomplishments are often overshadowed by those of her parents, the elder daughter of Marie and Pierre Curie was a brilliant researcher in her own right.

1. SHE WAS BORN TO, AND FOR, GREATNESS.

A black and white photo of Irene and Marie Curie in the laboratory in 1925.
Irène and Marie in the laboratory, 1925.
Wellcome Images, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 4.0

Irène’s birth in Paris in 1897 launched what would become a world-changing scientific dynasty. A restless Marie rejoined her loving husband in the laboratory shortly after the baby’s arrival. Over the next 10 years, the Curies discovered radium and polonium, founded the science of radioactivity, welcomed a second daughter, Eve, and won a Nobel Prize in Physics. The Curies expected their daughters to excel in their education and their work. And excel they did; by 1925, Irène had a doctorate in chemistry and was working in her mother’s laboratory.

2. HER PARENTS' MARRIAGE WAS A MODEL FOR HER OWN.

Like her mother, Irène fell in love in the lab—both with her work and with another scientist. Frédéric Joliot joined the Curie team as an assistant. He and Irène quickly bonded over shared interests in sports, the arts, and human rights. The two began collaborating on research and soon married, equitably combining their names and signing their work Irène and Frédéric Joliot-Curie.

3. SHE AND HER HUSBAND WERE AN UNSTOPPABLE PAIR.

Black and white photo of Irène and Fréderic Joliot-Curie working side by side in their laboratory.
Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Their passion for exploration drove them ever onward into exciting new territory. A decade of experimentation yielded advances in several disciplines. They learned how the thyroid gland absorbs radioiodine and how the body metabolizes radioactive phosphates. They found ways to coax radioactive isotopes from ordinarily non-radioactive materials—a discovery that would eventually enable both nuclear power and atomic weaponry, and one that earned them the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1935.

4. THEY FOUGHT FOR JUSTICE AND PEACE.

The humanist principles that initially drew Irène and Frédéric together only deepened as they grew older. Both were proud members of the Socialist Party and the Comité de Vigilance des Intellectuels Antifascistes (Vigilance Committee of Anti-Fascist Intellectuals). They took great pains to keep atomic research out of Nazi hands, sealing and hiding their research as Germany occupied their country, Irène also served as undersecretary of state for scientific research of the Popular Front government.

5. SHE WAS NOT CONTENT WITH THE STATUS QUO.

Irène eventually scaled back her time in the lab to raise her children Hélène and Pierre. But she never slowed down, nor did she stop fighting for equality and freedom for all. Especially active in women’s rights groups, she became a member of the Comité National de l'Union des Femmes Françaises and the World Peace Council.

6. SHE WORKED HERSELF TO DEATH.

Irène’s extraordinary life was a mirror of her mother’s. Tragically, her death was, too. Years of watching radiation poisoning and cancer taking their toll on Marie never dissuaded Irène from her work. In 1956, dying of leukemia, she entered the Curie Hospital, where she followed her mother’s luminous footsteps into the great beyond.

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iStock
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Live Smarter
You Can Now Order Food Through Facebook
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iStock

After a bit of controversy over its way of aggregating news feeds and some questionable content censoring policies, it’s nice to have Facebook roll out a feature everyone can agree on: allowing you to order food without leaving the social media site.

According to a press release, Facebook says that the company decided to begin offering food delivery options after realizing that many of its users come to the social media hub to rate and discuss local eateries. Rather than hop from Facebook to the restaurant or a delivery service, you’ll be able to stay within the app and select from a menu of food choices. Just click “Order Food” from the Explore menu on a desktop interface or under the “More” option on Android or iOS devices. There, you’ll be presented with options that will accept takeout or delivery orders, as well as businesses participating with services like Delivery.com or EatStreet.

If you need to sign up and create an account with Delivery.com or Jimmy John’s, for example, you can do that without leaving Facebook. The feature is expected to be available nationally, effective immediately.

[h/t Forbes]

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