11 Celebrity Marathoners

Next Monday, 25,000 people will gather in Hopkinton, Mass., for the start of the 113th Boston Marathon, the world's oldest annual marathon. When they cross the finish line, they'll join the ranks of the likes of Michael Dukakis, Mario Lopez, Lisa Ling, and Ali Landry, all of whom have navigated the same hilly, 26.2-mile course. Here are 11 other celebrities who have gone the distance at marathons throughout the world.

1. Oprah Winfrey

Wearing bib No. 40 to match her age, Winfrey finished the 1994 Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, DC, in 4 hours, 29 minutes, and 20 seconds. "This is better than an Emmy," Winfrey said after fulfilling a promise she made to herself eight years prior. Winfrey trained for 20 weeks leading up to the race with personal trainer Bob Greene, who ran alongside her. The race was filmed for a future episode of the Oprah Winfrey Show, during which Winfrey introduced the marathon's female winner, Susan Malloy.

2. Will Ferrell

ferrell.jpgFerrell, the actor and comedian who famously demonstrated his athletic prowess while streaking half-naked down a street in Old School, has run three marathons. The former Saturday Night Live star and his wife, Viveca, ran the New York City Marathon in 2001, finishing in 5 hours, 1 minute, and 6 seconds. Ferrell ran the Stockholm Marathon in 2002 and broke the 4-hour barrier at the Boston Marathon in 2003. In a 2008 interview, Ferrell described a lasting memory from his race in Stockholm, which was run on a very hot day: "I came around this corner, I'm in the last stretch just barely hanging on, and this woman offers me a salted pickle for refreshment. Just the sight of it, I almost lost it."

3. Katie Holmes

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Holmes ran the 2007 New York City Marathon in 5 hours, 29 minutes, and 58 seconds. Or did she? In the days that followed, websites such as Defamer and Gawker offered half-baked conspiracy theories that suggested Holmes didn't run the entire race. Holmes entered the race under an alias so that she wouldn't draw too much attention to herself beforehand, but her actual name is listed in the race results.

4. George W. Bush and 5. Sarah Palin

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Distraught after his father was defeated by Bill Clinton in the 1992 Presidential Election, George W. Bush turned to running. "I decided I was going to set a little project for myself," Bush told Runner's World in 2002. That project was training for the 1993 Houston Marathon, which Bush finished in 3 hours, 44 minutes, and 52 seconds. There's no word on whether Bush, who said that running helped teach him not to be so compulsive, will plan a similar project after the Republican Party's latest defeat. If he does, he has a potential training partner in Sarah Palin, who ran the Humpy's Marathon in Anchorage in 2005 in less than 4 hours.

6. Buster Martin

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Martin, a van cleaner for a plumbing service in London, completed the London Marathon in 2008 at the age of 94 or 101, depending on who you believe. Martin, who finished the race in 10 hours, claims he was 101, which would make him the oldest man to complete a marathon. Guinness World Records has refused to recognize the feat, however, because it is impossible to verify Martin's age. Martin, who was recognized as the UK's oldest employee in 2006, has two birth dates registered with the British National Health Service, and officials at Guinness have reason to believe that he was actually born in 1913. According to Guinness, Greek runner Dimitrion Yordanidis became the oldest man to complete a marathon when he did so in Athens in 1976 at the age of 98.

7. Sean "Diddy" Combs

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If you decide to train for a marathon, don't do as Diddy did. Entering the 2003 New York City Marathon to raise money for charity was a good idea; allowing only two months to train for the race was not. "I think the hardest part of training for me has been changing my lifestyle," said Diddy, who, in addition to working with celebrity trainer Mark Jenkins, trained with three-time New York City Marathon winner Alberto Salazar. "Cutting back on being out late, partying, working in the studio late, changing my diet." Running on an injured knee, Diddy finished the race in 4 hours and 14 minutes. USA Track & Field selected Diddy as its Athlete of the Week after he raised $2 million for children's charities leading up to the race.

8. Teddy Roosevelt

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Teddy's well-documented streak of futility in the mid-game Presidents' Race at Washington Nationals games continued at the 2008 Marine Corps Marathon, where the lovable loser proved that it's not always about winning and losing, but finishing the race. With security detail running alongside him, Teddy completed the marathon on the eve of his 150th birthday in 6 hours, 26 minutes, and 49 seconds, which was good enough for 17,944th place. If nothing else, he served as motivation for some of the slower participants in the race, who could either muster the energy to pass Teddy over the course of the final few miles or fall asleep that night knowing that they finished behind a guy with a 40-pound head.

9. Lance Armstrong

lance.jpgAfter he overcame cancer to win the Tour de France a record seven times, you could excuse Armstrong for thinking that his first marathon would be a breeze. Armstrong met his goal of breaking 3 hours at the 2006 New York City Marathon, but was humbled by the experience. "For the level of condition that I have now, that was without a doubt the hardest physical thing I have ever done," said Armstrong, who finished 856th in 2 hours, 59 minutes, and 36 seconds. "I never felt a point where I hit the wall, it was really a gradual progression of fatigue and soreness." Armstrong shaved 13 minutes off his time in the 2007 New York City Marathon. After he finished last year's Boston Marathon in 2:50:58, Armstrong jokingly asked, "Where's the flat marathons? Anybody know?"

10. Michael Waltrip and 11. Kyle Petty

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Petty and Waltrip have done their parts to dispel the belief that NASCAR drivers aren't athletes. Moving at roughly 7 miles per hour instead of their customary 200, the duo ran the 2005 Las Vegas Marathon to raise money for charity. Waltrip, a marathon veteran, finished in 3 hours, 56 minutes, while Petty, who was running his first marathon, finished in 4:16. "The wind was horrendous, but I enjoyed the race," Waltrip said. "I don't know if I could have run any faster." He then thanked his pit crew.

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10 Surprising Facts About Mr. Mom
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Shout! Factory

John Hughes penned the script for 1983's Mr. Mom, a comedy about a family man named Jack Butler (Micheal Keaton) who loses his job. To ensure their three kids are taken care of, his wife, Caroline (Teri Garr), goes back to work—leaving Jack to fight off a vacuum cleaner and learn why it's never a good idea to feed chili to a baby.

In 1982, Keaton turned in a star-making role in Ron Howard’s Night Shift, but Mr. Mom marked the first time he headlined a movie, and it launched his career. Hughes had written National Lampoon's Vacation, which—oddly enough—was released in theaters the weekend after Mr. Mom. But Hughes himself was still a relative unknown, as it would be another year before he entered the teen flick phase of his career, which would make him iconic.

In the meantime, Mr. Mom hit home for a lot of viewers, as the economy was on the downturn and more and more women were entering (or reentering) the workforce. But some people think that the movie's ending—which sees the couple revert to traditional gender roles—sidelined the movie's message. Still, on the 35th anniversary of its release, Mr. Mom remains an ahead-of-its-time comedy classic.

1. IT'S BASED ON A TRUE STORY.

Mr. Mom producer Lauren Shuler Donner came across a funny article John Hughes had written for National Lampoon. Based on that, she contacted him and the two became friends. “One day, he was telling me that his wife had gone down to Arizona and he was in charge of the two boys and he didn’t know what he was doing,” Donner told IGN. “It was hilarious! I was on the floor laughing. He said, ‘Do you think this would make a good movie?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, this is really funny.’ So he said, ‘Well, I have about 80 pages in a drawer. Would you look at it?’ So I looked at it and I said, ‘This is great! Let’s do it!’ We kind of developed it ourselves.” In the book Movie Moguls Speak, Donner mentioned how Hughes “had never been to a grocery store, he had never operated a vacuum cleaner. John was so ignorant, that in his ignorance, he was hilarious.”

The players involved with the movie told Donner and Hughes they thought it should be a TV movie. Hughes had a TV deal with Aaron Spelling, who came aboard to executive produce. “Then the players involved were upset because John was writing out of Chicago instead of L.A.,” Donner said in Movie Moguls Speak. “They fired John and brought in a group of TV writers. In the end, John and I were muscled out. It was a good movie, but if you ever read John’s original script for Mr. Mom, it’s far better.”

2. JOHN HUGHES REJECTED THE IDEA OF DIRECTING MR. MOM.

Stan Dragoti ended up directing the film, but only after Hughes turned it down, because he preferred to make his movies in Chicago, not Hollywood. “I don’t like being around the people in the movie business,” Hughes told Roger Ebert. “In Hollywood, you spend all of your time having lunch and making deals. Everybody is trying to shoot you down. I like to get my actors out here where we can make our movies in privacy.” Hughes remained in Chicago and filmed his directorial debut, Sixteen Candles, there.

3. MICHAEL KEATON GOT THE ROLE BECAUSE OF NIGHT SHIFT.

In 1982’s Night Shift, Keaton’s character works at a morgue and starts a prostitution ring with co-worker Henry Winkler. Donner had an agent friend, Laurie Perlman, who represented the not-yet-famous actor. She contacted Donner and pitched Keaton to her. “’Look, I represent this guy who is really funny. Would you meet with him?’" Donner recalled of the conversation. "So I met with him. Usually I don’t like to do this unless we’re casting, but I met with him because she was my friend. And then she said, ‘You have to see this movie Night Shift that he’s in.’ So I went to see Night Shift, and midway through I couldn’t wait to get out of that theater to give Mr. Mom to Michael Keaton. Fortunately, he liked it."

Keaton told Grantland that he turned down one of the main roles in Splash to play Jack Butler. “I just remember at the time thinking I wanted to get away from what I’d just done on Night Shift,” he said. “I thought if I do it again, I might get myself stuck. So then Mr. Mom came along. So I said no [to Splash] so I could set up this framework right away where I could do different things.”

4. THE FILM BROKE NEW GROUND.

Teri Garr, Michael Keaton, Taliesin Jaffe, Frederick Koehler, and Martin Mull in Mr. Mom (1983)
Shout! Factory

In 1983, more women stayed at home than worked, so it was a novelty for a man to be a stay-at-home dad. Today, an estimated 1.4 million men are stay-at-home dads, and 7 million men are their children's primary caregiver. “Mr. Mom became part of the vernacular,” Donner told Newsweek. “Mr. Mom represented a segment of men who were at home dealing with the kids who, up until then, really hadn’t been heard from. That’s what really told me about the power of film, because it spoke for a lot of men. It also helped women, because I think that women sometimes, if you’re a housewife, you’re not really appreciated for what you do. This sort of made women feel better about what they did because they knew that men were understanding it.”

5. TODAY, “MR. MOM” IS CONSIDERED A PEJORATIVE TERM.

More than 30 years after the film’s release, stay-at-home dads feel the term “Mr. Mom” should die. The National At-Home Dad Network launched a campaign to terminate the phrase and instead have people refer to men as “Dad.” In 2014 Lake Superior State University voted to banish “Mr. Mom” from the lexicon.

“At least, the pop-culture image of the inept dad who wouldn’t know a diaper genie from a garbage disposal has begun to fade,” wrote The Wall Street Journal, after declaring “Mr. Mom is dead.”

6. TERI GARR DIDN’T KNOW IT WAS A MESSAGE MOVIE.

The movie redefined gender roles, but when the producers pitched the premise to Garr, they hid the plot reversal. “They just told me it was about a guy who does the work that a woman does, because it’s so easy,” she told The A.V. Club. “And I went, ‘Oh, yeah. Ha ha.’ It’s so easy. All the women I know who stay home and take care of their kids, they go, ‘Oh yeah, this is easy.’ Hmm.”

7. MARTIN MULL IMPROVISED THE “220, 221” LINE.

The quote everyone remembers from the movie comes from Jack, holding a chainsaw, standing next to Ron Richardson (Martin Mull) and discussing what kind of wiring Jack will use in renovating the house: “220, 221, whatever it takes,” Jack says.

“We’re doing the scene and it was okay,” Keaton told Esquire. “And I remember saying to the prop guy, ‘Go find me a chainsaw.’ When he comes back with it, he says, ‘You wanna wear these?’ And he holds up some goggles. I go, ‘Yeah.’ You know, they make me look crazy. And when Martin shows up, I know I should look under control, I’m not sweating it. I’m a dude. So we’re standing there, Martin pulls me aside and says, ‘You know what you ought to say? When I ask about the wiring, you oughta just deadpan: ‘220, 221.’ I died. It was perfect. I may have added ‘whatever it takes.’ But it was his.”

“That was a little ad-lib that we just threw in, but every carpenter or construction person I’ve ever worked with, they’re always quoting that line from Mr. Mom,” Mull told The A.V. Club.

8. MR. MOM OUTGROSSED HUGHES’S OTHER 1983 SUMMER MOVIE—VACATION.

Mr. Mom only opened on 126 screens on July 22, 1983, but managed to gross $947,197 during its opening weekend. Once the film went wide a month later to 1235 screens, it hit number one at the box office and spent five weeks at the top. By the end of its run, the film had grossed just shy of $65 million, making it the ninth highest-grossing film of 1983 (just between Staying Alive and Risky Business). National Lampoon’s Vacation, Hughes’s other film that summer, came out July 29 and ended its theatrical run with $61,399,552 (at its height, it showed on 1248 screens). Vacation finished the year in 11th place.

9. THE MOVIE LED TO HUGHES BEING CALLED “A PURVEYOR OF HORNY SEX COMEDIES.”

During a 1986 interview with Seventeen magazine, Molly Ringwald asked the writer-director why he never showed teen sex in Sixteen Candles or The Breakfast Club. “In Sixteen Candles, I figured it would only be gratuitous to show Samantha and Jake in anything more than a kiss,” he said. “The kiss is the most beautiful moment. I was really amused when someone once called me a ‘purveyor of horny sex comedies.’ He listed The Breakfast Club and Mr. Mom in parentheses. I thought, ‘What kind of sex?’ Yes, in Mr. Mom there’s a baby in a bathtub and you see its bare butt.”

10. MR. MOM WAS MADE INTO A TV MOVIE AFTER ALL.

In the beginning, producers wanted Mr. Mom to be a TV movie, not a feature film. But a year after the film came out in theaters, ABC produced a TV movie called Mr. Mom, with the same characters and premise. Barry Van Dyke played Jack and Rebecca York played Caroline. A People magazine review of the movie stated: “They and their three kids are immediately likable … But it goes downhill from there as the script lobotomizes all its characters. Here’s a textbook case in how TV takes a cute idea—and a script that does have some good lines—and leeches the wit out of it.”

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