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Results Not Typical: Celebrity Secrets Behind the Advertised Weight Loss

The Federal Trade Commission is currently reviewing new guidelines for product endorsements. Their major beef? Advertisements that show "extreme" benefits of a product with a tiny, fine-print disclaimer. The new rules will force advertisers to show the typical or average results consumers can expect after using their product. And many companies are already sweating over the impact this may have on sales. As one rep put it, "Someone who can't fit in an airline seat is not going to pick up the phone for a 10-pound weight change."

Some of the celebrity spokespersons who might find their contracts affected by the new rules include:

Jillian Barberi's "Before" Shots

Nutrisystem spokesmodel Jillian Barberi boasts of losing 41 lbs. on the plan. What the fine print fails to mention is that in her "before" photos, Jillian is pregnant. Alert viewers in the Los Angeles area spotted her wearing the same dress (in the same physical shape) on a local morning TV show while gushing about her expected baby. Once baby Ruby was born, Barberi not only went on the Nutrisystem plan, she also hired a personal trainer (according to an interview in People) to get herself back in shape.

The Osmond Way

Picture 42.pngMarie Osmond also shills for Nutrisystem. What the TV testimonials don't mention, however, is that at about the same time Marie signed up for Nutrisystem, she also joined the Choose to Move program. And then she landed a spot on Dancing with the Stars, which she admitted required six hour per day workouts for several months that left her breathless and dripping with perspiration. While the  Nutrisystem foods must have helped, the relentless exercise also contributed to her losing an amazing 40 lbs. in five months.

Jared's Subway Secret

Picture 35.pngYou know Jared Fogle from the Subway commercials. Fogle lost 245 lbs. by eating Subway sandwiches. But it wasn't just the subs that did the trick; at age 20 Jared was consuming approximately 10,000 calories per day, and his physician father warned him that he was headed for an early grave if he didn't change his lifestyle. Jared saw an ad for Subway's "7 under 6" campaign and tried a turkey sub. He liked the sandwich and continued to use Subway as a daily source of low-fat meals, but he also incorporated exercise into his daily routine. Instead of using public transportation, he walked to Subway, and he used the stairs rather than the elevator whenever possible. After he lost some initial weight he found that his energy level had increased, and he began walking an additional mile or more per day.

No Ordinary Quacks

The new regulations will also require medical professionals who endorse products (often just referred to onscreen as "Dr.  ----", with no specialty or credentials listed) to be a specialist in said field; that is, an ophthalmologist could not legally give expert advice regarding a colon cleansing product. It will also be required that celebrities who endorse a product must reveal whether or not they are getting paid for the promotion and if they have an ownership interest in said product.

Which ads will you be glad to see struck down by the new rules? Those "work at home" schemes which prey on the elderly and the unemployed? Or maybe the myriad of skin rejuvenation products that subtly suggest women will certainly be dumped for a younger model if they let their face go to seed? Of course, men are also targets of insecurity, with all those "enhancement" products being pitched"¦.   Don't be shy, voice your outrage!

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How Google Chrome’s New Built-In Ad Blocker Will Change Your Browsing Experience
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If you can’t stand web ads that auto-play sound and pop up in front of what you’re trying to read, you have two options: Install an ad blocker on your browser or avoid the internet all together. Starting Thursday, February 15, Google Chrome is offering another tool to help you avoid the most annoying ads on the web, Tech Crunch reports. Here’s what Google Chrome users should expect from the new feature.

Chrome’s ad filtering has been in development for about a year, but the details of how it will work were only recently made public. “While most advertising on the web is respectful of user experience, over the years we've increasingly heard from our users that some advertising can be particularly intrusive,” Google wrote in a blog post. “As we announced last June, Chrome will tackle this issue by removing ads from sites that do not follow the Better Ads Standards.

That means the new feature won’t block all ads from publishers or even block most of them. Instead, it will specifically target ads that violate the Better Ad Standards that the Coalition for Better Ads recommends based on consumer data. On desktop, this includes auto-play videos with sound, sticky banners that follow you as you scroll, pop-ups, and prestitial ads that make you wait for a countdown to access the site. Mobile Chrome users will be spared these same types of ads as well as flashing animations, ads that take up more than 30 percent of the screen, and ads the fill the whole screen as you scroll past them.

These criteria still leave room for plenty of ads to show up online—the total amount of media blocked by the feature won’t even amount to 1 percent of all ads. So if web browsers are looking for an even more ad-free experience, they should use Chrome’s ad filter as a supplement to one of the many third-party ad blockers out there.

And if accessing content without navigating a digital obstacle course first doesn’t sound appealing to you, don’t worry: On sites where ads are blocked, Google Chrome will show a notification that lets you disable the feature.

[h/t Tech Crunch]

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Why Subliminal Messaging Doesn't Work (Unless You Want It To)
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Subliminal messages—hidden phrases in TV programs, movies, and ads—probably won't make you run out and join the Navy, appreciate a band's music, or start smoking. That's because these sneaky suggestions don't really change consumer behavior, even though many people believe otherwise, according to Sci Show Psych.

We say "don't really" because subliminal messages can sway the already motivated, research shows. For example, a 2002 study of 81 college students found that parched subjects drank more water after being subliminally primed with words like "dry" and "thirsty." (Participants who weren't already thirsty drank less.) A follow-up experiment involving 35 undergrads yielded similar results, with dehydrated students selecting sports drinks described as "thirst-quenching" over "electrolyte-restoring" after being primed for thirst. Experiments like these won't work on, say, chocolate-loving movie audiences who are subliminally instructed by advertisers to purchase popcorn instead.

Learn more about how subliminal messaging affects (or doesn't affect) our decision-making, and why you likely won't encounter ads with under-the-radar suggestions on the regular.

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