CLOSE
Original image

The Weird Week in Review

Original image

Anti-litter Leaflets Dumped in Street

Matt Taylor of Walthamstow Village, England found boxes containing was he assumed was rubbish on the street near his home. Leaving boxes of litter on the road could lead to a fine of  £50,000 fine or five years in prison. The boxes contained leaflets issued by the local council to educate the public about illegal dumping and littering! Cabinet member Bob Belam said the boxes were left as part of the planned distribution program, which meant leaflets against litter would eventually be left at each household. In other areas of the world, government leaflets would be considered litter whether they were left in torn boxes or at homes.

770-pound Ray Caught

Ian Welch of Hampshire, England caught the biggest freshwater fish ever caught with a rod. The 770-pound ray was pulled out of the Maeklong River in Thailand. The fish was seven feet wide and had a ten foot tail. It took 13 men to lift the ray out of the water. The catch was weighted, photographed, tagged, and released. A DNA sample was taken also. Welch is a biologist, and was in Thailand working with a project to tag stingrays.

Man Saves Lives, Gets Ticket

58-year-old Jim Moffett and another man were helping two elderly women cross the street in Denver last Friday night after they get off the bus he was driving. As a pickup truck slid on the snowy road, Moffett pushed the three other people out of the way. The pickup hit Moffett, who was taken to a hospital, where he was listed in serious condition on Wednesday. Colorado State Police issued citations to Moffet and the other man for jaywalking! Police said that despite Moffett's good intentions, jaywalking contributed to the incident.

Giant White Rabbit Leads Police Chase

120whiterabbit.pngPolice in Canterbury, England chased a 20-pound white rabbit through the streets for 20 minutes Sunday. Officers Matt Jackson and Yasmin Mossadegh of Kent Police had to enlist the help of eight bystanders. In a scene reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland, the ten people finally corralled the albino bunny. The rabbit is in the care of Barton Veterinary Hospital, and has been nicknamed Tiny. Officials don't know where the rabbit came from, but he is presumed to be someone's pet.

Bungee Cord Breaks

49-year-old Mark Afforde couldn't resist a second bungee jump from the 200-foot high Canyon Creek Bridge near Yacolt, Washington. At the bottom of the drop, the bungee cord snapped, and he fell the last 25 feet into shallow water.

"I heard and saw the snap. I definitely felt the impact, and I was underwater. Once I checked and made certain I could still move and everything was working I felt I needed to get out of the water.

He was able to walk to shore, and paramedics took him to Southwest Washington Medical Center in Vancouver.

Afforde, who was not seriously injured, says he would bungee jump again. His wife feels differently.

Komodo Dragon Attacks Ranger

150_kimodo.jpgPark Ranger Main was sitting in his office on the island of Rinca in Indonesia when a komodo dragon came in and attacked him! He wrestled with the dragon, then climbed out a window. Office workers beat the animal with sticks to get it out of the building. Main required 30 stitches to repair lacerations on his hand and foot.

Nothing like this has ever happened to me... in 25 years on the job. I've never been attacked.

Death Ruled Suspicious When Bullet Holes Found

When 49-year-old Anthony Crockett was found dead in his Kansas City home, paramedics also found medications for diabetes, high blood pressure, and cholesterol. They thought he died of his ailments and no investigation was initiated. The embalmer, however, discovered the man had bullet holes in his head! The medical examiner then changed the  cause of death to homicide. Neither medical examiners nor police had inspected Crockett's body before it was removed from his home.

Original image
Little Baby's Ice Cream
arrow
Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
Original image
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

Original image
iStock
arrow
travel
Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
Original image
iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios