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How Did You Know? - {Day 2}

We're back with another 5-day trivia hunt!

Again, the rules: Every remaining day this week, I'll be presenting a specific challenge. Your job: come up with the answers and hold onto them! Why? Because on Monday, next week, you'll need them to solve a short puzzle. The first person to email in the correct answers and successfully show how you arrived at them (thus the title: How Did You Know?) wins a choice of any TWO t-shirts and book from our store. In addition to the above, we'll be awarding a t-shirt to one random winner who has all the correct answers. So even if you're not the first one with the right answers, there's still a chance to wind up a winner on HDYK?

And remember, we're also giving away a really big, sa-weeet prize to any winning contestant who can defend the title three months in a row. Peter Dapier and Patrick Corrado are our current champions. You can read about them here.

As with previous How Did You Know? posts, comments have been turned off, but I definitely encourage you to work in teams like our present champions did. Write your friends, send around each daily challenge, conspire, work together, whatever it takes to make sure you're armed with the right answers going into next Monday's puzzle. (Questions? drop us an e-mail at: TriviaHunt@Gmail.com)

If you missed Day 1, be sure to check it out here.

Today we're playing Name That Animal. Each clue word on the following pages has at least one animal (or species of animal) hiding in it. (I'm only looking for simple, common words here, no fancy Latin names. e.g. Elephant, not Proboscidea) On the last page you'll find a crossword puzzle. Based on the clue words provided, there are at least two correct solutions to the crossword puzzle. Your job: discover at least one solution by unearthing 10 correct words that fit the puzzle.

Instead of traditional down and across clues, you have to use the four clue words provided to figure out your answers. All the answers found in the puzzle can be pulled out of the four clue words. You may NOT use combinations of words (e.g. MOUSE, using the M-O-U-E from Volume and the S from Salutation). The letters must come from within each individual clue word. There seems to be some confusion here, so I'm adding this note: If the clue word were GODLESS, you could extract DOG. Also, you cannot use two Gs or two Ls in your answer word because there aren't two in the clue word. You could, however, use two Ss, because there are two Ss in the clue word. Hope that clarifies some of the confusion!

I recommend printing the crossword and using a pencil until you figure out how the 10 words go together. When you send in your answers next week, just provide the answer number (1, 2, 3 etc.) from the puzzle, along with your word.

See you back for your third challenge tomorrow...

Prorate

Volume

Torte

Salutation

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