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The Weird Week in Review

Surfer Finds Teeth Two Days Later

67-year-old Phillip Worth was surfing Australia's coast at Terrigal on New Year's Eve when he lost his upper plate in the waves. As he was 100 meters out into the ocean, he never imagined he'd see the teeth again. Two days later, Worth was at the beach when the dentures washed onto shore! He says they are even better than when he lost them.

"They're sharper I noticed, truly."

Bullet Stopped by Hair Weave

Briana Bonds drove to a store in Kansas City, where her ex-boyfriend spotted her and shot  into her car. The rear window was shattered under the force of four or five shots as Bonds drove away. Later, a bullet was recovered from Bonds' hair! Bonds believes her tightly-woven hair extensions slowed the bullet and protected her from harm. The boyfriend, Juan Kemp, and another man were arrested in the incident.

Goat Breaks into Home, Eats Cake

Sherry Shirley of Westford, Wisconsin opened her front door to let her dog in Saturday, and a goat rushed inside, jumped onto a kitchen counter, and began to eat a cake that was cooling. A neighbor pulled he goat outside by its horns before police arrived. Captain Molly Soblewski said the goat left tracks leading to a farm.

"The goat didn't do a lot of damage. It knocked some dishes to the floor that broke and began eating the chocolate cake she had just made," Soblewski said.

"It was just an unfortunate circumstance," she said. "I feel sorry for the lady, but it is kind of funny."

Ireland's Worst Driver Identified

150prawojazdy.jpgTraffic police in Ireland had continually cited Prawo Jazdy for various driving and parking violations, but Mr. Jazdy always gave a different address. The mystery driver was recently unveiled when it was pointed out that "Prawo Jazdy", the words at the top of the license, is Polish for "driver's license"! Poles are Ireland's most numerous immigrant group. A search revealed that Prawo Jazdy was ticketed over 50 times! Presumably, Irish police have learned two words of Polish through the embarrassing incident.

Indiana Woman Lonely After 23 Marriages

Linda Wolfe of Anderson, Indiana is in the Guiness Book of World Records as the most married woman, with 23 marriages under her belt. Now 68, Wolfe has been single for twelve years, but is open to the possibility of getting hitched for the 24th time.

"I would get married again," she said, "because, you know, it gets lonely." 

Giant Rat Caught in China

120giantrat.jpgA six-pound rat was caught in Fuzhou, Fujian, China by a Mr. Xian, who grabbed the rat after he saw a crowd gathered around it. The rat had a 12-inch tail and teeth an inch long. Forestry officials who saw pictures think it's a Chinese bamboo rat, which rarely grow over ten inches long, but cannot be sure until they examine the rat itself. The world's largest rat is the African giant pouched rat, which can grow up to 36 inches long.

Woman Captures Suspect with Wedgie

Veterinary technician Yvonne Morris of Salt Lake City, Utah apprehended a man she saw breaking into a co-worker's car in an unorthodox manner. She chased the suspected thief, then grabbed his boxer shorts and pulled! After administering the wedgie, she took him in a head lock until police arrived. The unidentified man was arrested for attempted burglary and outstanding warrants.

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Animals
Bizarre New Species of Crabs and a Giant Sea Cockroach Discovered in Waters Off Indonesia
One known species of isopod, or "giant sea cockroach"
One known species of isopod, or "giant sea cockroach"
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A crab with green googly eyes, another with "ears" resembling peanuts, and a species of giant sea cockroach are among the dozen new kinds of crustaceans discovered by scientists in the waters off Indonesia, Channel News Asia reports.

These finds are the result of a two-week expedition by Indonesian and Singaporean scientists with the South Java Deep Sea Biodiversity Expedition (SJADES 2018), which involved exploring deep waters in the Sunda Strait (the waterway separating the islands of Sumatra and Java in Southeast Asia) and the Indian Ocean. Using trawls, dredges, and other tools, researchers brought a huge variety of deep-sea life to the surface—some species for the very first time.

"The world down there is an alien world," Peter Ng, chief scientist of the expedition, told Channel News Asia. "You have waters that go down more than 2000 to 3000 meters [9800 feet], and we do not know … the animal life that's at the bottom."

The giant sea cockroach—technically a giant isopod, also nicknamed a Darth Vader isopod—is a new species in the genus Bathynomus, measuring almost a foot long and found more than 4000 feet deep. The isopods are occasionally seen on the ocean floor, where they scuttle around scavenging for dead fish and other animals. This marked the first time the genus has ever been recorded in Indonesia.

Another find is a spider crab nicknamed Big Ears, though it doesn't actually have ears—its peanut-shaped plates are used to protect the crab's eyes.

More than 800 species were collected during the expedition, accounting for 12,000 individual animals. Researchers say it will take up to two years to study all of them. In addition to the 12 species that are completely new to science, 40 were seen for the first time in Indonesia. Creatures that the scientists dubbed a chain-saw lobster, an ice cream cone worm, and a cock-eyed squid were among some of the rarer finds.

A "Chain-Saw Lobster"
Nicknamed the "Chain-Saw Lobster," this creature is a rare blind lobster, found only in the deep seas.

Researchers took to the giant sea cockroach quickly, with some of the crew members reportedly calling it “cute” and cradling it like a baby. Check out Channel News Asia Insider's video below for more insight into their creepy finds.

[h/t Channel News Asia]

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Weird
The Mysterious Case of the Severed Feet in British Columbia
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While walking on the beach, many people look out for a number of things: Shells, buried treasure, crabs, and dolphins among them. But if you’re on a beach in British Columbia, you might want to keep an eye out for something a little more sinister—about 15 severed feet have washed up on the shores there in the past few years. The latest was found on May 6, wedged in a mass of logs on Gabriola Island, according to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

The feet have been surprising unlucky British Columbians for over a decade. The first appeared back in 2007 on Jedediah Island; it was eventually matched to a deceased man whose family declined to provide additional information. Bizarre, but not particularly alarming—until another one showed up on Gabriola Island less than a month later. More feet followed, and though some were matched to missing persons, most remained anonymous (feet, unfortunately, don’t contain much identifying information). Instead, police focused on the fact that each foot was encased in a running shoe—though sizes, genders, and brands differed.

This seems like a real-life episode of The X-Files, but it turns out there’s a perfectly reasonable explanation for the severed feet: They’re not really “severed,” which would indicate cutting or slicing, at all. According to scientists who tested the theory, the feet likely belong to suicide, drowning, or plane crash victims. It’s common for decomposing bodies to come apart at the joint, making it natural for the foot to come apart from the leg. But if that’s the case, wouldn’t hands be similarly susceptible to washing up on beaches? Nope, that’s where the shoes come in.

While the rest of the body naturally decomposes in water, feet are surprisingly well protected inside the rubber and fabric of a shoe. The soles can be pretty buoyant, and sometimes air pockets get trapped inside the shoe, making it float to the surface. Most of the “severed” feet have been clad in jogging shoes such as Nikes and Pumas, but at least one case involves a hiking boot. In that instance, the boot (and foot) was matched to a man who went missing while fishing more than 25 years ago. The most recent case also involves a hiking boot.

That leaves the question: Why British Columbia? According to Richard Thompson, an oceanographer with the federal Institute of Ocean Sciences, it’s connected to ocean current. “There’s a lot of recirculation in the region; we’re working here with a semi-enclosed basin. Fraser River, False Creek, Burrard Inlet—all those regions around there are somewhat semi-enclosed. The tidal currents and the winds can keep things that are floating recirculating in the system." Several feet have also been found further south, in Washington state, which shares a network of coastal waterways with British Columbia.

Others aren’t so quick to accept this scientific analysis, however. Criminal lawyer and crime author Michael Slade still wonders if a serial killer is afoot. "We also have to consider that this could be a serial killer," he said. "Somebody who right now is underneath the radar. That has to be on the table."

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