CLOSE

Management Styles of the Rich and Fictional

Believe it or not, you can learn a lot from some successful moguls who just happen to be completely made up. Here's a look at the management strategies of some of our favorite fictional leaders.

1. Scrooge McDuck

This self-made Scottish duck tycoon, with holdings in mines and mills, seems an almost infallible industrial titan. He does have a few cracks as a businessman, though. For one thing, the opportunity cost of keeping all of one's money in a giant vault is vast. Even a conservative investment strategy could net Scrooge millions in interest each year, but he prefers to swim around in his coins instead. Also, Scrooge's willingness to appoint his young, probably under-qualified nephews to key positions within his empire smacks of nepotism. Moreover, any good human-resources manager will tell you that having a male boss running around without pants on all day is a multimillion-dollar lawsuit just waiting to happen.

2. Cosmo G. Spacely

mr-spacely.jpg
George Jetson's boss at Spacely Space Sprockets isn't going to get many "World's Best Boss" coffee mugs. (If they even drink coffee in the future.) His diminutive stature belies his enormous drive to make irate videophone threats to his employees. Rather than seeking to maximize shareholder value with his sprocket business, Spacely focuses on destroying his chief competitor, Cogswell Cogs. This Ahab-like pursuit often leads Spacely to act irrationally, injuring the company's long-run prospects. Furthermore, Spacely's penchant for firing his employees at the drop of a hat exposes the company to a slew of wrongful-termination lawsuits.

3. C. Montgomery Burns

burns-mr.jpg
Homer Simpson's glowering boss at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant has always been a leader in new and ruthless business strategies. When his employees requested coffee breaks, for example, he outsourced the entire plant to India. In another incident, he devised a marketing coup to block out the sun to foster more demand for his product. His penny-pinching tactics have occasionally backfired, though. His tightfisted refusal to continue the company's dental plan led to a long and expensive strike, and his total disregard for safety codes has several times brought the plant to the brink of meltdown.

This article was excerpted from our upcoming 'Business School in a Box.'

nextArticle.image_alt|e
arrow
video
Tips For Baking Perfect Cookies
5668610549001

Perfect cookies are within your grasp. Just grab your measuring cups and get started. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
entertainment
Netflix's Most-Binged Shows of 2017, Ranked
iStock
iStock

Netflix might know your TV habits better than you do. Recently, the entertainment company's normally tight-lipped number-crunchers looked at user data collected between November 1, 2016 and November 1, 2017 to see which series people were powering through and which ones they were digesting more slowly. By analyzing members’ average daily viewing habits, they were able to determine which programs were more likely to be “binged” (or watched for more than two hours per day) and which were more often “savored” (or watched for less than two hours per day) by viewers.

They found that the highest number of Netflix bingers glutted themselves on the true crime parody American Vandal, followed by the Brazilian sci-fi series 3%, and the drama-mystery 13 Reasons Why. Other shows that had viewers glued to the couch in 2017 included Anne with an E, the Canadian series based on L. M. Montgomery's 1908 novel Anne of Green Gables, and the live-action Archie comics-inspired Riverdale.

In contrast, TV shows that viewers enjoyed more slowly included the Emmy-winning drama The Crown, followed by Big Mouth, Neo Yokio, A Series of Unfortunate Events, GLOW, Friends from College, and Ozark.

There's a dark side to this data, though: While the company isn't around to judge your sweatpants and the chip crumbs stuck to your couch, Netflix is privy to even your most embarrassing viewing habits. The company recently used this info to publicly call out a small group of users who turned their binges into full-fledged benders:

Oh, and if you're the one person in Antarctica binging Shameless, the streaming giant just outed you, too.

Netflix broke down their full findings in the infographic below and, Big Brother vibes aside, the data is pretty fascinating. It even includes survey data on which shows prompted viewers to “Netflix cheat” on their significant others and which shows were enjoyed by the entire family.

Netflix infographic "The Year in Bingeing"
Netflix

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios