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The Dada of Us All: Man Ray

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Emmanuel Radnitsky (1890-1976), better known as Man Ray, led a life as interesting as his artwork. Referred to as "the Dada of us all" by one of his patrons, Man Ray is popular with "Feel Art Again" readers, especially Bob the Walrus and Corrine, who both requested a post on the man who sought to "amuse, bewilder, annoy, and inspire."

1. Man Ray was once described by his brother-in-law, Joseph Browner, as "a kind of short man who looked a little like Mr. Peepers, spoke slowly with a slight Brooklynese accent, and talked so you could never tell when he was kidding."

2. Although he was born in Pennsylvania, Man Ray spent the longest periods of his life in New York, Paris, and California. He also had strong opinions about his cities. Upon leaving New York for Paris, Man Ray said of his former home, "Dada cannot live in New York. All New York is dada, and will not tolerate a rival." In later years, he never became fully comfortable in Hollywood, and likened California to a "beautiful prison."

3. Man Ray's photographs are full of the famous artistic and literary figures of his time, including James Joyce, Constantin Brancusi, Gertrude Stein, Joseph Stella, Jean Cocteau, Pablo Picasso, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Matisse, Marcel Duchamp (as Rrose Sélavy), and Marcel Proust (on his deathbed).

4. While Man Ray had many lovers over the years, he only married twice. His first marriage only lasted a few years, but his second marriage, to Juliet Browner, lasted a full 30 years. Browner and Man Ray were married in 1946, in a double-wedding with their friends Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning. They remained together until Man Ray's death in 1976.

5. Upon his death in 1976, Man Ray was interred at the Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris with the epitaph, "unconcerned, but not indifferent." When his wife Juliet Browner passed away in 1991, she was interred in the same tomb, with the epitaph, "together again."

Larger versions of "Le Violon d'Ingres (Ingres's Violin)" (1924) and "Tears" (1930-1932) are available.

Fans should check out the Man Ray Trust; Man Ray Photo; Tate Modern's "Duchamp, Man Ray, Picabia" exhibition; and the collections of Man Ray's work at the George Eastman House, the Getty Museum, the MoMA, and SFMOMA.

"Feel Art Again" appears every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. You can e-mail us at feelartagain@gmail.com with details of current exhibitions, for sources or further reading, or to suggest artists.

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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