Morning Cup of Links: The Sari-Eating Machine

The hacker who infiltrated Twitter a few days ago explains the very simple way he did it. The lesson learned: don't make your passwords so easy to guess, especially if you administer a social network site.
*
The Washing Machine That Ate My Sari. When it comes to developing successful products and services for a global market, there is an almost infinite number of ways to get it wrong. Also see Cross Cultural Marketing Blunders. (via Metafilter)
*
9 Methods for Mastering Your Money in 2009. Commonsense advice with tips on getting these things done. (via Consumerist)
*
The Viral Video Pet Store. Why get just a dog or cat, when you can get one that will bring you millions of hits on YouTube?
*
Despite DNA technology, it's harder to solve a murder than ever before. Factors on both sides of the law have causes a drastic drop in the case clearance rate.
*
The Execution of Mata Hari, 1917. An eyewitness account of last moments for the exotic dancer turned spy. (via Cynical-C)
*
Totally inappropriate coloring books. Which makes them instant collector's items, of course.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
iStock
iStock

Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
Bone Collector
iStock
iStock

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios