The Internet Looks Back at 2008

The internet as we know it was built by, and is populated with, people who are just obsessive-compulsive enough to appreciate a good, ranked top ten list. The turning over of every calendar year is a fine excuse to indulge in an orgy of list-making, as we sum up the previous year and see if there are some lessons we can learn for the new year.

Politics

The news in 2008 was dominated by the US presidential election. Now that the dust has settled somewhat, we can look back at memorable quotes to recall those golden moments, or take another look at the political ads we thought we'd never want to see again. We can go back and find out who broke the stories we remember about the campaign. You can even relive the campaign in comic form. Or, if you are so inclined, take another look at the videos that influenced the electorate. Year-end reviews even come in song and in LOLcat form!

News

250mugyear.jpgIn other news, websites made lists of what they specialize in. The Smoking Gun posted the most memorable mug shots of the year. A couple of those ended up in the most embarrassing photos of the year. Consumerist listed their most disgusting stories. You'll also find a list of the oddest travel stories of 2008. The top crime stories are listed, as well as stupid criminals. Environmental stories made headlines in 2008, as well as the people behind them.

Oh, but we're just getting started! Continue reading for more lists of 2008.

Tech

250iphone.jpgThe world of technology had a pretty good year, judging from the number of year-end lists. Read about the past year's top technology breakthroughs, the biggest technology stories, or significant trends in technology. In some stories, technology news intersected with politics. 2008 may be remembered as the year the geeks took over -or at least that's the way geeks would like to remember it. There were some really disappointing video games and some brilliant gadgets released over the year. All in all, it was a good year for hi-tech products, although there were still some stupid ones.

Sports

250phelps.jpg2008 saw plenty of sports action at the Olympics, where Michael Phelps emerged as the #1 athlete, but he wasn't the only star. We'll always remember the golden moments in Beijing because there are plenty of Olympic photographs. Many sites listed the top sports moments of 2008: AskMen, the Chicago Tribune, and the Houston Press, among others. Each ranking is different. See a large gallery of great sports photographs from 2008 courtesy of Sports Illustrated. Then there are the more bizarre sports lists, such as the most embarrassing football moments and the top sports-related arrests.

Science

250spiral-art-web.jpgScience gives us plenty of year-end lists. Science magazine named the top ten scientific breakthroughs of 2008 and ScienceNow listed their most-read articles of the year. And science lists get very specific for each field. National Geographic listed the top ten archaeological finds as well as the top ten dinosaur and fossil finds of 2008. In biology, read about the top ten new organisms of the year. New Scientist tells us about a year in the quantum world. And then there's the top ten medical stories. Astronomy gave us many amazing stories; here are the top five. You can also see some wonderful astronomy pictures from 2008, whether you want a collection of ten or fifty.

Entertainment

250joker.jpgIt's a tradition to list the best songs, albums, movies, and books every year, even before the internet age. Those lists are basic, and the internet gives us the expanded versions, with the most overlooked albums, the biggest musical flops, funniest music videos of the year, and even the hottest hip-hop wives and girlfriends of 2008. There are lists of movies that made the most money, worst films, independent films, and foreign films. For TV, you'll find plenty of lists of the bad things on the tube, and if you look hard, you may find a list or two about the best of TV.

People

250newman.jpgWe don't know yet who was born to be famous in 2008, but we remember those who left us. You'll find lists of famous people who died, not-so-famous people who died, overlooked people who died, musicians who died, and inventors who died this past year. Also see a list of 15-minute celebrities and celebrities to snark at from 2008. And don't forget to vote in the loser of the year poll.

Online

250matt.jpgThe internet is nothing if not introspective. Many sites and blogs post a list of their best stories at the end of the year. Jon Swift posted everyone else's best story, limited to one post per blogger. But videos are what we spent the most time looking at. You'll find tons of 2008 viral video countdowns. Some edited them into a single video. Some took reader votes. Some listed five, nine, ten, or even thirty (but mostly ten). And they are all different! There were thousands of videos produced in 2008, but the one most watched last year was quite a bit older, as seen in this top five countdown from ABC.
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In case you are looking for lists that aren't mentioned here, you might try TIME's Top Ten Everything of 2008, or the daddy of all lists of annual lists from Filmoculous. Those should keep you busy for a while.

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College Board Wants to Erase Thousands of Years From AP World History, and Teachers Aren't Happy
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iStock

One would be forgiven for thinking that the Ides of March are upon us, because Julius Caesar is being taken out once again—this time from the Advanced Placement World History exam. The College Board in charge of the AP program is planning to remove the Roman leader, and every other historical figure who lived and died prior to 1450, from high school students’ tests, The New York Times reports.

The nonprofit board recently announced that it would revise the test, beginning in 2019, to make it more manageable for teachers and students alike. The current exam covers over 10,000 years of world history, and according to the board, “no other AP course requires such an expanse of content to be covered over a single school year.”

As an alternative, the board suggested that schools offer two separate year-long courses to cover the entirety of world history, including a Pre-AP World History and Geography class focusing on the Ancient Period (before 600 BCE) up through the Postclassical Period (ending around 1450). However, as Politico points out, a pre-course for which the College Board would charge a fee "isn’t likely to be picked up by cash-strapped public schools," and high school students wouldn't be as inclined to take the pre-AP course since there would be no exam or college credit for it.

Many teachers and historians are pushing back against the proposed changes and asking the board to leave the course untouched. Much of the controversy surrounds the 1450 start date and the fact that no pre-colonial history would be tested.

“They couldn’t have picked a more Eurocentric date,” Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, who previously helped develop AP History exams and courses, told The New York Times. “If you start in 1450, the first thing you’ll talk about in terms of Africa is the slave trade. The first thing you’ll talk about in terms of the Americas is people dying from smallpox and other things. It’s not a start date that encourages looking at the agency and creativity of people outside Europe.”

A group of teachers who attended an AP open forum in Salt Lake City also protested the changes. One Michigan educator, Tyler George, told Politico, “Students need to understand that there was a beautiful, vast, and engaging world before Europeans ‘discovered’ it.”

The board is now reportedly reconsidering its decision and may push the start date of the course back some several hundred years. Their decision will be announced in July.

[h/t The New York Times]

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Nate D. Sanders Auctions
Sylvia Plath's Pulitzer Prize in Poetry Is Up for Auction
Nate D. Sanders Auctions
Nate D. Sanders Auctions

A Pulitzer Prize in Poetry that was awarded posthumously to Sylvia Plath in 1982 for her book The Collected Poems will be auctioned on June 28. The Los Angeles-based Nate D. Sanders Auctions says bidding for the literary document will start at $40,000.

The complete book of Plath’s poetry was published in 1981—18 years after her death—and was edited by her husband, fellow poet Ted Hughes. The Pulitzer Prize was presented to Hughes on Plath’s behalf, and one of two telegrams sent by Pulitzer President Michael Sovern to Hughes read, “We’ve just heard that the Collected Plath has won the Pulitzer Prize. Congratulations to you for making it possible.” The telegrams will also be included in the lot, in addition to an official congratulatory letter from Sovern.

The Pultizer’s jury report from 1982 called The Collected Poems an “extraordinary literary event.” It went on to write, “Plath won no major prizes in her lifetime, and most of her work has been posthumously published … The combination of metaphorical brilliance with an effortless formal structure makes this a striking volume.”

Ted Hughes penned an introduction to the poetry collection describing how Plath had “never scrapped any of her poetic efforts,” even if they weren’t all masterpieces. He wrote:

“Her attitude to her verse was artisan-like: if she couldn’t get a table out of the material, she was quite happy to get a chair, or even a toy. The end product for her was not so much a successful poem, as something that had temporarily exhausted her ingenuity. So this book contains not merely what verse she saved, but—after 1956—all she wrote.”

Also up for auction is Plath’s Massachusetts driver’s license from 1958, at which time she went by the name Sylvia P. Hughes. Bidding for the license will begin at $8000.

Plath's driver's license
Nate D. Sanders Auctions

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