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10 Horribly Misspelled Album Titles (and why we like 'em!)

By Adam K. Raymond
Misspelling album titles is one of the grandest traditions in music. From The Zombies' Odessey and Oracle released in 1968 to Ghostface Killah's The Big Doe Rehab released in 2007, misspelling titles, intentionally or not, transcends time and genre. Here are 10 of our favorites and the stories behind them.

1. Rejoyce: The Christmas Album - Jessica Simpson (2004)

Before blaming Jessica Simpson's third-grade reading level for the misspelling of her Christmas album Rejoyce, realize that it's all an act. The spelling of Rejoyce is in fact intentional—an  homage to Simpson's late grandmother Joyce Adams Simpson. Jess and Joyce were very close before her passing and the entire album was dedicated to the matriarch of the Simpson clan, who, though certainly a sweet woman, let forth a torrent of suck unlike anyone since Mrs. Olive Osmond.

2. White Limozeen - Dolly Parton (1989)

album9.pngBelieve it or not, the word limousine in White Limozeen is spelled that way because neither Dolly nor songwriter Mac Davis could spell the word correctly. To be fair though, neither could we. Thank you spell check!

3. Odessey and Oracle - The Zombies (1968)

album10.pngThe famously misspelled title of the classic Zombies album is the least intentional on the list. The band wanted to call the album "Odyssey and Oracle" but cover artist Terry Quirk thwarted that. Quirk accidently spelled the title wrong and the band, too nice to tell him about his mistake, decided to run with the misspelling. But like a good rock band should, they made up a story about the title, claiming that the misspelling was meant to be a play on ode, thus odessey.

4. Amerikkka's Most Wanted - Ice Cube (1990)

album2.pngOn Ice Cube's debut solo album, the rapper turned awful, awful actor makes a blunt social and political statement by replacing the "c" in America with three Ks. The 20-year-old Cube was angry when the album was released—angry at the police, angry at America, and angry at John Walsh. According to some, or maybe just Wikipedia, the album is also a critique of Fox's criminal-catching hour America's Most Wanted, which Cube opposed because he said it perpetuated stereotypes of blacks in its criminally bad reenactments.

5. Punk in Drublic - NOFX (1994)

album 7.pngPunk in Drublic isn't the only spoonerism in musical history (the Aerosmith's Night in the Ruts and Wheatus' Suck Fony stand out), but it might be the most famous. Released at the height of pop punk's ascension into the mainstream—both Offspring's Smash and Green Day's Dookie were released in 1994—Punk in Drublic was certified gold and is still NOFX's highest charting album. Not that they care about selling records or anything. The title continues the band's tradition of advocating the use of reality-altering substances, especially in drublic.

6. Youthanasia - Megadeth (2004)

album1.pngDave Mustaine and Megadeth, not generally known as international child advocates, used the title of their sixth album to make the point that kids worldwide are being exploited. But you knew that. What you might not have known: the album was banned in Singapore and Malaysia because of the "offensive" art work. Ever the rebel, Mustaine refused to cave in to demands to censor it, saying, "Keeping our records off the shelves does not make the problem of our children being hung out to dry disappear."

7. The Big Doe Rehab - Ghostface Killah (2007)

album5.pngIf The Big Doe Rehab had you thinking that Ghostface was making a transition from hardcore New York City rapper to proprietor of a deer rehabilitation facility, you're just a hair off. When Ghostface uses  "doe" in his album title he means "dough," slang for money. In an interview with MTV.com Ghostface explained the meaning of the title: he had a dream in which he was in rehab with a bunch of rich people. When he awoke the title hit him.

8. Get up Offa That Thing - James Brown (1976)

album4.pngFor those who need a translation from James Brown's superbad version of English, "offa" means "off of." As in, "get up off of that thing." As in, get up off your ass and dance. As in get up off of your ass and dance while wearing a sequin cape.

9. piouhgd - Butthole Surfers (1991)

album6.pngLeave it to a record label to ruin the absurdist statement of artists. When Rough Trade released piouhgd in 1991, it included a false press release explaining that the title should be pronounced "pee-owed" and that it meant "I told you" in Navajo. Not true. Turns out the Butthole Surfers wanted the title to be unpronounceable, in the same way their music is supposed to be unlistenable. Kidding.

10. Sheik Yerbouti - Frank Zappa (1979)

album8.pngDo you see how Zappa made a play on KC and the Sunshine Band's "Shake Your Booty" by turning it into the name of a respected Arab gentlemen? Pretty good. Sheik Yerbouti is part of Zappa's self-proclaimed  "dumb entertainment"—goofier commercial albums made to finance his artier endeavors. The album included Zappa's Grammy-nominated "Dancin' Fool" and the controversial song "Jewish Princess."

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5 Subtle Cues That Can Tell You About Your Date's Financial Personality
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Being financially compatible with your partner is important, especially as a relationship grows. Fortunately, there are ways you can learn about your partner’s financial personality in a relationship’s early stages without seeing their bank statement or sitting them down for “the money talk.”

Are they a spender or a saver? Are they cautious with money? These habits can be learned through basic observations or casual questions that don’t feel intrusive. Here are some subtle things that can tell you about your date’s financial personality.

1. HOW THEY ANSWER BASIC MONEY QUESTIONS.

Casual conversations about finance-related topics can be very revealing. Does your date know if their employer matches their 401(k) plan contributions? Do you find their answers to any financial questions a bit vague—even the straightforward ones like “What are the rewards like on your credit card?” This could mean that your partner is a little fuzzy on some of the details of their financial situation.

As your connection grows, money talks are only natural. If your date expresses uncertainty about their monthly budget, it may be an indicator that they are still working on the best way to manage their finances or don’t keep close tabs on their spending habits.

2. WHAT THEY’RE WATCHING AND READING.

If you notice your partner is always watching business news channels, thumbing through newspapers, or checking share prices on their phone, they are clearly keeping abreast of what’s going on in the financial world. Ideally, this would lead to a well-informed financial personality that gives way to smart investments and overall monetary responsibility.

If you see that your date has an interest in national and global finances, ask them questions about what they’ve learned. The answers will tell you what type of financial mindset to expect from you partner moving forward. You might also learn something new about the world of finance and business!

3. WHERE THEY GET THEIR FOOD.

You may be able to learn a lot about someone’s financial personality just by asking what they usually do for dinner. If your date dines out a lot, it could be an indication that they are willing to spend money on experiences. On the other hand, if they’re eating most of their meals at home or prepping meals for the entire week to cut their food budget, they might be more of a saver.

4. WHETHER THEY’RE VOICING MONEY CONCERNS.

Money is a source of stress for most people, so it’s important to observe if financial anxiety plays a prominent role in your date’s day-to-day life. There are a number of common financial worries we all share—rising insurance rates, unexpected car repairs, rent increases—but there are also more specific and individualized concerns. Listen to how your date talks about money and pick up on whether their stress is grounded in worries we all have or if they have a more specific reason for concern.

In both instances, it’s important to be supportive and helpful where you can. If your partner is feeling nervous about money, they’ll likely be much more cautious about what they’re spending, which can be a good thing. But it can also stop them from making necessary purchases or looking into investments that might actually benefit them in the future. As a partner, you can help out by minimizing their expenses for things like nights out and gifts in favor of less expensive outings or homemade gifts to leave more of their budget available for necessities.

5. HOW THEY HANDLE THE BILL.

Does your date actually look at how much they’re spending before handing their credit card to the waiter or bartender at the end of the night? It’s a subtle sign, but someone who looks over a bill is likely much more observant about what they spend than someone who just blindly hands cards or cash over once they get the tab.

Knowing what you spend every month—even on smaller purchases like drinks or dinner—is key when you’re staying on a budget. It’s that awareness that allows people to adjust their monthly budget and calculate what their new balance will be once the waiter hands over the check. Someone who knows exactly what they’re spending on the small purchases is probably keeping a close eye on the bigger picture as well.

REMEMBER THERE’S NO SUBSTITUTE FOR TALKING.

While these subtle cues can be helpful signposts when you’re trying to get an idea of your date’s financial personality, none are perfect indicators that will be accurate every time. Our financial personalities are rarely cut and dry—most of us probably display some behaviors that would paint us as savers while also showing habits that exclaim “spender!” By relying too heavily on any one indicator, we might not get an accurate impression of our date.

Instead, as you get to know a new partner, the best way to learn about their financial personality is by having a straightforward and honest talk with them. You’ll learn more by listening and asking questions than you ever could by observing small behaviors.

Whatever your financial personality is, it pays to keep an eye on your credit score. Discover offers a Free Credit Scorecard, and checking it won't impact your score. It's totally free, even if you aren't a Discover customer. Check yours in seconds. Terms apply. Visit Discover to learn more.

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Where Do Birds Get Their Songs?
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Birds display some of the most impressive vocal abilities in the animal kingdom. They can be heard across great distances, mimic human speech, and even sing using distinct dialects and syntax. The most complex songs take some practice to learn, but as TED-Ed explains, the urge to sing is woven into songbirds' DNA.

Like humans, baby birds learn to communicate from their parents. Adult zebra finches will even speak in the equivalent of "baby talk" when teaching chicks their songs. After hearing the same expressions repeated so many times and trying them out firsthand, the offspring are able to use the same songs as adults.

But nurture isn't the only factor driving this behavior. Even when they grow up without any parents teaching them how to vocalize, birds will start singing on their own. These innate songs are less refined than the ones that are taught, but when they're passed down through multiple generations and shaped over time, they start to sound similar to the learned songs sung by other members of their species.

This suggests that the drive to sing as well as the specific structures of the songs themselves have been ingrained in the animals' genetic code by evolution. You can watch the full story from TED-Ed below, then head over here for a sample of the diverse songs produced by birds.

[h/t TED-Ed]

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