CLOSE
Original image

10 Horribly Misspelled Album Titles (and why we like 'em!)

Original image

By Adam K. Raymond
Misspelling album titles is one of the grandest traditions in music. From The Zombies' Odessey and Oracle released in 1968 to Ghostface Killah's The Big Doe Rehab released in 2007, misspelling titles, intentionally or not, transcends time and genre. Here are 10 of our favorites and the stories behind them.

1. Rejoyce: The Christmas Album - Jessica Simpson (2004)

Before blaming Jessica Simpson's third-grade reading level for the misspelling of her Christmas album Rejoyce, realize that it's all an act. The spelling of Rejoyce is in fact intentional—an  homage to Simpson's late grandmother Joyce Adams Simpson. Jess and Joyce were very close before her passing and the entire album was dedicated to the matriarch of the Simpson clan, who, though certainly a sweet woman, let forth a torrent of suck unlike anyone since Mrs. Olive Osmond.

2. White Limozeen - Dolly Parton (1989)

album9.pngBelieve it or not, the word limousine in White Limozeen is spelled that way because neither Dolly nor songwriter Mac Davis could spell the word correctly. To be fair though, neither could we. Thank you spell check!

3. Odessey and Oracle - The Zombies (1968)

album10.pngThe famously misspelled title of the classic Zombies album is the least intentional on the list. The band wanted to call the album "Odyssey and Oracle" but cover artist Terry Quirk thwarted that. Quirk accidently spelled the title wrong and the band, too nice to tell him about his mistake, decided to run with the misspelling. But like a good rock band should, they made up a story about the title, claiming that the misspelling was meant to be a play on ode, thus odessey.

4. Amerikkka's Most Wanted - Ice Cube (1990)

album2.pngOn Ice Cube's debut solo album, the rapper turned awful, awful actor makes a blunt social and political statement by replacing the "c" in America with three Ks. The 20-year-old Cube was angry when the album was released—angry at the police, angry at America, and angry at John Walsh. According to some, or maybe just Wikipedia, the album is also a critique of Fox's criminal-catching hour America's Most Wanted, which Cube opposed because he said it perpetuated stereotypes of blacks in its criminally bad reenactments.

5. Punk in Drublic - NOFX (1994)

album 7.pngPunk in Drublic isn't the only spoonerism in musical history (the Aerosmith's Night in the Ruts and Wheatus' Suck Fony stand out), but it might be the most famous. Released at the height of pop punk's ascension into the mainstream—both Offspring's Smash and Green Day's Dookie were released in 1994—Punk in Drublic was certified gold and is still NOFX's highest charting album. Not that they care about selling records or anything. The title continues the band's tradition of advocating the use of reality-altering substances, especially in drublic.

6. Youthanasia - Megadeth (2004)

album1.pngDave Mustaine and Megadeth, not generally known as international child advocates, used the title of their sixth album to make the point that kids worldwide are being exploited. But you knew that. What you might not have known: the album was banned in Singapore and Malaysia because of the "offensive" art work. Ever the rebel, Mustaine refused to cave in to demands to censor it, saying, "Keeping our records off the shelves does not make the problem of our children being hung out to dry disappear."

7. The Big Doe Rehab - Ghostface Killah (2007)

album5.pngIf The Big Doe Rehab had you thinking that Ghostface was making a transition from hardcore New York City rapper to proprietor of a deer rehabilitation facility, you're just a hair off. When Ghostface uses  "doe" in his album title he means "dough," slang for money. In an interview with MTV.com Ghostface explained the meaning of the title: he had a dream in which he was in rehab with a bunch of rich people. When he awoke the title hit him.

8. Get up Offa That Thing - James Brown (1976)

album4.pngFor those who need a translation from James Brown's superbad version of English, "offa" means "off of." As in, "get up off of that thing." As in, get up off your ass and dance. As in get up off of your ass and dance while wearing a sequin cape.

9. piouhgd - Butthole Surfers (1991)

album6.pngLeave it to a record label to ruin the absurdist statement of artists. When Rough Trade released piouhgd in 1991, it included a false press release explaining that the title should be pronounced "pee-owed" and that it meant "I told you" in Navajo. Not true. Turns out the Butthole Surfers wanted the title to be unpronounceable, in the same way their music is supposed to be unlistenable. Kidding.

10. Sheik Yerbouti - Frank Zappa (1979)

album8.pngDo you see how Zappa made a play on KC and the Sunshine Band's "Shake Your Booty" by turning it into the name of a respected Arab gentlemen? Pretty good. Sheik Yerbouti is part of Zappa's self-proclaimed  "dumb entertainment"—goofier commercial albums made to finance his artier endeavors. The album included Zappa's Grammy-nominated "Dancin' Fool" and the controversial song "Jewish Princess."

Original image
IFC Films
arrow
entertainment
10 Surprising Facts About The Babadook
Original image
IFC Films

In 2014, The Babadook came out of nowhere and scared audiences across the globe. Written and directed by Aussie Jennifer Kent, and based on her short film Monster, The Babadook is about a widow named Amelia (played by Kent’s drama schoolmate Essie Davis) who has trouble controlling her young son Samuel (Noah Wiseman), who thinks there’s a monster living in their house. Amelia reads Samuel a pop-up book, Mister Babadook, and Samuel manifests the creature into a real-life monster. The Babadook may be the villain, but the film explores the pitfalls of parenting and grief in an emotional way. 

“I never approached this as a straight horror film,” Kent told Complex. “I always was drawn to the idea of grief, and the suppression of that grief, and the question of, how would that affect a person? ... But at the core of it, it’s about the mother and child, and their relationship.”

Shot on a $2 million budget, the film grossed more than $10.3 million worldwide and gained an even wider audience via streaming networks. Instead of creating Babadook out of CGI, a team generated the images in-camera, inspired by the silent films of Georges Méliès and Lon Chaney. Here are 10 things you might not have known about The Babadook (dook, dook).

1. THE NAME “BABADOOK” WAS EASY FOR A CHILD TO INVENT.

Jennifer Kent told Complex that some people thought the creature’s name sounded “silly,” which she agreed with. “I wanted it to be like something a child could make up, like ‘jabberwocky’ or some other nonsensical name,” she explained. “I wanted to create a new myth that was just solely of this film and didn’t exist anywhere else.”

2. JENNIFER KENT WAS WORRIED PEOPLE WOULD JUDGE THE MOTHER.

Amelia isn’t the best mother in the world—but that’s the point. “I’m not a parent,” Kent told Rolling Stone, “but I’m surrounded by friends and family who are, and I see it from the outside … how parenting seems hard and never-ending.” She thought Amelia would receive “a lot of flak” for her flawed parenting, but the opposite happened. “I think it’s given a lot of women a sense of reassurance to see a real human being up there,” Kent said. “We don’t get to see characters like her that often.”

3. KENT AND ESSIE DAVIS TONED DOWN THE CONTENT FOR THE KID.

Noah Wiseman was six years old when he played Samuel. Kent and Davis made sure he wasn’t present for the more horrific scenes, like when Amelia tells Samuel she wishes he was the one who died, not her husband. “During the reverse shots, where Amelia was abusing Sam verbally, we had Essie yell at an adult stand-in on his knees,” Kent told Film Journal. “I didn’t want to destroy a childhood to make this film—that wouldn’t be fair.”

Kent explained a “kiddie version” of the plot to Wiseman. “I said, ‘Basically, Sam is trying to save his mother and it’s a film about the power of love.’”

4. THE FILM IS ALSO ABOUT “FACING OUR SHADOW SIDE.”

IFC Films

Kent told Film Journal that “The Babadook is a film about a woman waking up from a long, metaphorical sleep and finding that she has the power to protect herself and her son.” She noted that everybody has darkness to face. “Beyond genre and beyond being scary, that’s the most important thing in the film—facing our shadow side.”

5. THE FILM SCARED THE HELL OUT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE EXORCIST.

In an interview with Uproxx, William Friedkin—director of The Exorcist—said The Babadook was one of the best and scariest horror films he’d ever seen. He especially liked the emotional aspect of the film. “It’s not only the simplicity of the filmmaking and the excellence of the acting not only by the two leads, but it’s the way the film works slowly but inevitably on your emotions,” he said.

6. AN ART DEPARTMENT ASSISTANT SCORED THE ROLE AS THE BABADOOK.

Tim Purcell worked in the film’s art department but then got talked into playing the titular character after he acted as the creature for some camera tests. “They realized they could save some money, and have me just be the Babadook, and hence I became the Babadook,” Purcell told New York Magazine. “In terms of direction, it was ‘be still a lot,’” he said.

7. THE MOVIE BOMBED IN ITS NATIVE AUSTRALIA.

Even though Kent shot the film in Adelaide, Australians didn’t flock to the theaters; it grossed just $258,000 in its native country. “Australians have this [built-in] aversion to seeing Australian films,” Kent told The Cut. “They hardly ever get excited about their own stuff. We only tend to love things once everyone else confirms they’re good … Australian creatives have always had to go overseas to get recognition. I hope one day we can make a film or work of art and Australians can think it’s good regardless of what the rest of the world thinks.”

8. YOU CAN OWN A MISTER BABADOOK BOOK (BUT IT WILL COST YOU). 

IFC Films

In 2015, Insight Editions published 6200 pop-up books of Mister Babadook. Kent worked with the film’s illustrator, Alexander Juhasz, who created the book for the movie. He and paper engineer Simon Arizpe brought the pages to life for the published version. All copies sold out but you can find some Kent-signed ones on eBay, going for as much as $500.

9. THE BABADOOK IS A GAY ICON.

It started at the end of 2016, when a Tumblr user started a jokey thread about how he thought the Babadook was gay. “It started picking up steam within a few weeks,” Ian, the Tumblr user, told New York Magazine, “because individuals who I presume are heterosexual kind of freaked out over the assertion that a horror movie villain would identify as queer—which I think was the actual humor of the post, as opposed to just the outright statement that the Babadook is gay.” In June, the Babadook became a symbol for Gay Pride month. Images of the character appeared everywhere at this year's Gay Pride Parade in Los Angeles.

10. DON'T HOLD YOUR BREATH FOR A SEQUEL.

Kent, who owns the rights to The Babadook, told IGN that, despite the original film's popularity, she's not planning on making any sequels. “The reason for that is I will never allow any sequel to be made, because it’s not that kind of film,” she said. “I don’t care how much I’m offered, it’s just not going to happen.”

Original image
Bruce Weaver / Stringer / Getty Images
arrow
Space
NASA Is Posting Hundreds of Retro Flight Research Videos on YouTube
Original image
Bruce Weaver / Stringer / Getty Images

If you’re interested in taking a tour through NASA history, head over to the YouTube page of the Armstrong Flight Research Center, located at Edwards Air Force Base, in southern California. According to Motherboard, the agency is in the middle of posting hundreds of rare aircraft videos dating back to the 1940s.

In an effort to open more of its archives to the public, NASA plans to upload 500 historic films to YouTube over the next few months. More than 300 videos have been published so far, and they range from footage of a D-558 Skystreak jet being assembled in 1947 to a clip of the first test flight of an inflatable-winged plane in 2001. Other highlights include the Space Shuttle Endeavour's final flight over Los Angeles and a controlled crash of a Boeing 720 jet.

The research footage was available to the public prior to the mass upload, but viewers had to go through the Dryden Aircraft Movie Collection on the research center’s website to see them. The current catalogue on YouTube is much easier to browse through, with clear playlist categories like supersonic aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. You can get a taste of what to expect from the page in the sample videos below.

[h/t Motherboard]

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios