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The Tilted Twister

Every website under the sun is recommending Christmas gifts, but I could find no gadget cooler than one you can't buy. The Tilted Twister is three times cool just to start with because it's a robot made of Lego material that solves a Rubik's cube. Hans Andersson built it from a Lego Mindstorms NXT kit. I am completely humbled by the process of designing the brains that run this thing. First, it "looks" at all the cube sides and records the colors. Then it matter-of-factly goes about repositioning and twisting the cube until the colors match up -in about 60 moves. By contrast, I have never solved a Rubik's cube in my life, although I have attempted it a few times.

Just watch the cute little thing in action.

The Tilted Twister is self-contained and not connected to a PC. The beauty of it is in its seeming simplicity while it accomplishes such a complex task. You can try to make your own if you like. Andersson has posted building instructions and a downloadable program to get you going. I could sit and watch this thing all day! I might even be able to put one together. now that someone else has done the hard part.

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14 Things You Owned in the '70s That are Worth a Fortune Now
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DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images

From old toys and housewares to books and records, these pieces of '70s memorabilia have aged (and increased in value) like fine wine.

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The '90s Called: Original Tamagotchis Are Coming Back to the U.S.
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Like the school project eggs and crying baby dolls that came before them, Tamagotchis taught '90s kids real responsibility. The handheld digital pets were needy little pixels that demanded constant attention, food, and cleanings. Armed with just three buttons, Tamagotchi owners had to take care of their creatures by raising them from eggs and keeping them alive.

Now today's youth can also attempt to parent digital pets: Back in April, The Telegraph reported that the beloved gadgets were making a comeback, but that the newly designed eggs would only be on sale on Amazon Japan for around ¥2000 (about $18). The retro toy proved popular enough that it will now be making its way to the U.S. According to Mashable, Tamagotchis will hit stores in America on November 5—just in time for holiday shopping.

After both Furby and Trolls made their own triumphant returns, it only makes sense to see other classic toys try to court a new generation of kids. Despite the simple nature of the toy, the plastic devices were a huge hit, with over 76 million being sold around the world. Since the success of the handheld games, the franchise has expanded into other realms like video games and board games. This latest venture is a return to form, embracing the old characters and repackaging them in a new, smaller device.

[h/t Mashable]

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