The Quick 10: The 10 Top-Earning Chefs

Today's Q10 comes to us straight from Forbes. Do a good job at Thanksgiving and this could be you, next year! These are yearly earnings, by the way, not total earnings.

bourdain10. Anthony Bourdain, $1.5 million. I was pleased to see this, because I love Anthony Bourdain. I especially like the No Reservations where he ends up stranded in Romania because of a crappy rental car and the guide he is with throws is back out trying to move the car. So, the guide drinks to try to alleviate the pain. Eventually, the guide (who was also Bourdain's friend) ended up pounding on a table with his fist drunkenly yelling, "Tony! Tony!" It was fabulous. The figure seems low to me, though, considering the restaurants, the show, the books, etc.

9. Bobby Flay, $1.5 million. I don't have much to say about Bobby Flay, "˜cause I don't really like him. OK, that's not fair. He is the owner and executive chef of six restaurants, has eight cookbooks, and has hosted seven Food Network shows.

8. Tom Colicchio, $2 million. The Top Chef judge owns the Craft line of restaurants, including 'wichcraft. He also used to be the co-owner, co-founder, and executive chef of NYC's Gramercy Tavern.

7. Mario Batali, $3 million. This seems low, too "“ he's owns not one"¦ not two"¦ but 13 restaurants in New York, L.A. and Vegas. But he's also got the cookware. I guess if he runs low on cash he could always approach Crocs about becoming a spokesperson.

6. Paula Deen, $4.5 million. My mom's favorite!

Two Food Network shows, cookbooks, a magazine, an memoir "“ Paula's money comes as much from selling her personality as it does from her butter-soaked, Southern-style food.

5. Alain Ducasse, $5 million. He tops Batali's 13 restaurants "“ Ducasse owns 22 across the world. But he's got some incredibly interesting side projects going on - he has two cooking schools in Paris - one for the general public and one specifically for chefs. His school for chefs is partnering with the European Space Agency for tastier astronaut meals.

4. Nobuyuki Matsuhisa, $5 million. He co-owns 17 Nobu sushi joints (yum). But I'm sure the real money comes from his movie royalties - he was Mr. Roboto in Austin Powers in Goldmember. On second thought, I bet his four cookbooks do OK, too.

ramsay3. Gordon Ramsay, $7.5 million. He might be a television personality, but no doubt the dude can cook. He's got a total of 13 Michelin stars, the third highest number in the world (Alain Ducasse and French Chef Joel Robuchon rank above him). Couple that with the cookbooks, the autobiographies and the T.V. shows, and you can see where the $7.5 million comes from.
2. Wolfgang Puck, $16 million. He started with Spago and now owns 15 other restaurants, plus Wolfgang Puck Express, which you can find in airports across the world. And he's developing his brand into your grocery store, too.

1. Rachael Ray, $18 million. You know, I liked Rachael Ray at first, but I'm waaaay over her. She was too everywhere, too fast. But being everywhere apparently meant lots of cash for Rachael, since she's bringing in $18 mil a year. That includes her Food Network shows, her magazine, her talk show, her EVOO brand olive oil and her Dunkin' Donuts endorsement.

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Ernest Hemingway’s Guide to Life, In 20 Quotes
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Though he made his living as a writer, Ernest Hemingway was just as famous for his lust for adventure. Whether he was running with the bulls in Pamplona, fishing for marlin in Bimini, throwing back rum cocktails in Havana, or hanging out with his six-toed cats in Key West, the Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning author never did anything halfway. And he used his adventures as fodder for the unparalleled collection of novels, short stories, and nonfiction books he left behind, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, Death in the Afternoon, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea among them.

On what would be his 119th birthday—he was born in Oak Park, Illinois on July 21, 1899—here are 20 memorable quotes that offer a keen perspective into Hemingway’s way of life.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF LISTENING

"I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen."

ON TRUST

"The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them."

ON DECIDING WHAT TO WRITE ABOUT

"I never had to choose a subject—my subject rather chose me."

ON TRAVEL

"Never go on trips with anyone you do not love."


Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. [1], Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INTELLIGENCE AND HAPPINESS

"Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know."

ON TRUTH

"There's no one thing that is true. They're all true."

ON THE DOWNSIDE OF PEOPLE

"The only thing that could spoil a day was people. People were always the limiters of happiness, except for the very few that were as good as spring itself."

ON SUFFERING FOR YOUR ART

"There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed."

ON TAKING ACTION

"Never mistake motion for action."

ON GETTING WORDS OUT

"I wake up in the morning and my mind starts making sentences, and I have to get rid of them fast—talk them or write them down."


Photograph by Mary Hemingway, in the Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston., Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE BENEFITS OF SLEEP

"I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I'm awake, you know?"

ON FINDING STRENGTH 

"The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places."

ON THE TRUE NATURE OF WICKEDNESS

"All things truly wicked start from innocence."

ON WRITING WHAT YOU KNOW

"If a writer knows enough about what he is writing about, he may omit things that he knows. The dignity of movement of an iceberg is due to only one ninth of it being above water."

ON THE DEFINITION OF COURAGE

"Courage is grace under pressure."

ON THE PAINFULNESS OF BEING FUNNY

"A man's got to take a lot of punishment to write a really funny book."


By Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. - JFK Library, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON KEEPING PROMISES

"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut."

ON GOOD VS. EVIL

"About morals, I know only that what is moral is what you feel good after and what is immoral is what you feel bad after."

ON REACHING FOR THE UNATTAINABLE

"For a true writer, each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed."

ON HAPPY ENDINGS

"There is no lonelier man in death, except the suicide, than that man who has lived many years with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it."

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