CLOSE
Original image

10 Holiday Hats: the Silly Side of Thanksgiving

Original image

For some families, the Thanksgiving feast is a sacred and solemn occasion. For others, the holiday is orchestrated by the control freak who insists that everything be picture-perfect. And quite a few families put their personal tensions and passive-aggressiveness on display. The perfect remedy for these uptight feasts is a ridiculous holiday hat.

1. The Gobbler

The Gobbler Hat has it all: a turkey who still has his head, feathers, and his own Pilgrim hat. This hat is so popular that it is sold out at the half-dozen or so suppliers I checked. Maybe next year.

2. Sexy Turkey Hat

440sexyturkey.jpg

Here's a much fancier (and more feminine) turkey hat.

There are some people, I am told, that have elegant Thanksgiving suppers. Then there are the rest of us.

No, you can't buy it, but you can buy the knitting pattern and make your own by next year.

3. Paper Turkey

440paperhat.jpg

The cheapest way to wear a turkey for Thanksgiving is to make one yourself, out of construction paper, using a children's activity website as a guide. Kids look cute in these. Adults? Maybe not so cute, but you'll draw attention wherever you go.

4. Roast Turkey Hat

440plushturkey.jpg

This nice fuzzy plush turkey hat from Miles Kimball will set you back $9.99 but will remind everyone at the dinner table that a) you love roast turkey, and b) you're a real dork.

5. Chef's Hat

440russturkey.jpg

Russ Parsons, food editor of the L.A. Times was recently spotted wearing a similar hat while preparing the fashion inspiration. Note how accurate the color of the hat is!

6. Cold Turkey

435_chickenvikinghat.jpg

Check out this Cold Turkey Hat modeled by Vicki at Knitorious! This one is called the Cold Turkey hat because Vicki and her friend who made it both quit smoking about the time this picture was taken, but you could whip one up to wear at the dinner table Thursday. Here are complete knitting instructions for a child size hat and an adult-sized hat.

7. Pumpkin Cap

440pumpkincap.jpg

Turkey isn't the only dish on the menu. Pumpkin pie, pumpkin bread, pumpkin cookies, and a pumpkin cap! This cap is knitted from 100% organic cotton and is available in sizes from infants to adults. For the very few who think cranberry sauce is the best thing about Thanksgiving, you can have a hat, too.

8. Pilgrim Hat

440pilgrimhat.jpg

While half your family is looking forward to pumpkin pie and the other half just want to get back to the football game, someone needs to reference the historical roots of the holiday. What better way than to show up in a deluxe pilgrim hat! In this case, we overlook the fact that the Pilgrims did not wear buckles on their hats; modern day celebrants wouldn't recognize the hat without one.

9. Indian Feathers

440feathers.jpg

The Native American half of the Plymouth Colony Thanksgiving celebration didn't wear any particular kind of hat you would recognize today, but a few feathers might remind your family and friends who really saved the Pilgrims from complete extinction. I'm not sure why this model is sneering. Maybe he really hates the combination of green and purple.

10. Thanks Cap

440thankshat.jpg

I believe this hat is the most appropriate of all. Simple, fashionable, and it's the only one in this collection that symbolizes what Thanksgiving is really all about.

Yes, I understand that liquor may be more effective at loosening family tensions during the holiday, but funny hats are safer on the highways.

Original image
iStock
arrow
Lists
11 Classic Facts About Converse Chucks
Original image
iStock

Converse’s Chuck Taylor sneakers have been around since the early 20th century, but they haven’t changed much—until recently. In 2015, The Chuck II—a new line of Converse that looks much the same as the original shoe but with a little more padding and arch support—hit stores. In honor of the kicks' staying power, here are 11 facts about Converse Chuck Taylor All-Stars.  

1. They were originally athletic shoes. 

The Converse All-Star debuted in 1917 as an athletic sneaker. It quickly became the number one shoe for basketball, then a relatively new sport (basketball was invented by James Naismith in 1891, but the NBA wasn't founded until 1946). By the late 1940s, most of the NBA sported Chucks. They remain the best-selling basketball shoes of all time, even though very few people wear them for basketball anymore. (Many teams switched to leather Adidas in the late ‘60s.)

2. Converse previously made rain boots.

The company started in 1908 as a rubber shoe company that produced galoshes.  

3. The All-Star design hasn’t really changed since 1917.

The updated Chuck II is Converse’s first real attempt to update its flagship product since the early 20th century. The company is understandably reticent to shake things up: All-Stars make up the majority of the company’s revenue, and like any classic design, its fans can be die-hards. In the 1990s, when the company tried to introduce All-Stars that were more comfortable and had slightly fewer design inconsistencies, hardcore aficionados rebelled. “They missed the imperfections in the rubber tape that lines the base of the shoe,” according to the Washington Post. The company went back to making a slightly imperfect shoe.

4. Chuck Taylor was a basketball player and trainer ...

Chuck Taylor in 1921. Image Credit: North Carolina State University via Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Taylor was a Converse salesman and former professional basketball player who traveled around the country teaching basketball clinics (and selling shoes) starting in the 1920s. His name was added onto an ankle patch on the sneaker in 1932

5. ... And though he sold a lot of Chucks, he wasn't always a great coach.

Taylor is in large part responsible for the shoe’s popularity with athletes (the company rewarded him with an unlimited expense account), but his training advice wasn’t always the best. As former University of North Carolina player Larry Brown told Spin in an oral history of the shoe:

My greatest memory of Chuck Taylor—probably ’61 or ’62—is that he told Coach [Dean] Smith that he’d make us special weighted shoes in Carolina blue. The idea was that we’d wear the weighted shoes in practice, and then during the games, we’d run faster and jump higher. Well, we tried them for one practice and everyone pulled a hamstring.

6. Converse didn’t intend for their shoes to be punk.

“We always thought of ourselves as an athletic shoe company,” John O’Neil, who oversaw Converse’s marketing from 1983 to 1997, told Spin. “We wanted to sell a wholesome shoe.” The company was still touting its shoes as basketball sneakers as late as 2012, and some of its non-Chucks sneakers still have pro endorsers.

7. The company owns a recording studio.

Finally embracing its role in the music scene, the company launched Rubber Tracks, a Brooklyn-based recording studio where bands can record for free, in 2011.

8. Not all the Ramones were fans. 

Chuck Taylors are associated with punk rockers, especially the Ramones, but not everyone in the band wore them. “Dee Dee and I switched over to the Chuck Taylors because they stopped making [the style of] U.S. Keds and Pro-Keds [that we liked],” Marky Ramone told Spin. “Joey never wore them. He needed a lot of arch support and Chuck Taylors are bad for that.”

9. Chucks were initially only high tops. 

In 1962, Converse rolled out its first oxford Chuck Taylor All-Stars. Previously, it had just been a high-top shoe. Four years later, the company would introduce the first colors other than black and white.

10. Rocky ran in them.

In 1976, All-Stars were still considered a viable athletic shoe. If you look closely at the training montage from Rocky, you’ll see the boxer is wearing Chucks. 

11. Wiz Khalifa loves them. 

The rapper named his record label Taylor Ganag Records, in part due to his appreciation for Chuck Taylors. In 2013, he launched a shoe collection with Converse featuring 12 styles. 

Original image
Adidas, Mari Orr
arrow
Design
Adidas Collaborates With Artists to Create Sneakers for All 50 States
Original image
Iowa
Adidas, Mari Orr

For a recent project from Adidas and Refinery29, artists were given a women’s running shoe to use as their blank canvas. Their only prompt: Design the sneaker to represent one of the American states. The results are as varied and colorful as the nation itself.

As Adweek reports, the initiative, dubbed BOOST the Nation, takes an all-American look at Adidas’s UltraBOOST X footwear line. Refinery29 selected several artists—all women—to put their regional stamp on the plain white shoe. Some have been decorated with state flora. For instance, the Florida sneaker sports a tropical frond and the shoe for North Carolina is embellished with Venus flytraps. Food is also a popular theme: Wisconsin cheese, Maine lobster, and Tennessee barbecue have all been incorporated into sneaker designs.

Each sneaker is one-of-a kind and only available through auction. All proceeds raised will go directly to Women Win, an organization dedicated to bringing sports to adolescent girls around the world. The auction runs through Tuesday, July 11, with current bids ranging from $110 to $2000. Check out the artists’ handiwork that's for sale below.

Sneaker designed to look like a peach.
Georgia

Checkered running shoe.
Indiana

Adidas, Jen Mussari

Yellow running shoe with cracker tag.
Wisconsin

Sneaker designed to look like a mountain.
South Dakota
Adidas, Mari Orr

Sneaker decorated with wheat.
Oklahoma

Adidas, Jen Mussari

Sneaker embellished with fake roses and leaves.
Kentucky

Pink running shoe with lobster claw.
Maine

[h/t Adweek]

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios