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Sweetest Song Ever: "Tonight You Belong to Me"

The song "Tonight You Belong to Me" was written in 1926 by Billy Rose and Lee David. Gene Austin made the song a hit a year later, and it was brought back to prominence in the 1950's by various acts (Frankie Laine and The Lennon Sisters among them). At just over two minutes, it's short and sweet -- and surprisingly easy to sing. Most of us know it today because of a famous rendition from the movie The Jerk, which features Steve Martin and Bernadette Peters performing the song on a beach. (Peters rocks a mean cornet solo, too.)

"Tonight You Belong to Me" is a perennial cover, often performed to close concerts. For your viewing enjoyment this winter morning, I've dug up a few great covers of the tune. At the end of the post, I've linked to a video showing you how to play the song on ukelele. But first here's John Hodgman, Jonathan Coulton, and The Long Winters performing live in Portland on November 8, 2008:

Fiona Apple and Jon Brion (plus some members of Nickel Creek):

Eddie Vedder duets with Janet Weiss at Sleater Kinney's final performance in 2006:

Josh Ritter and Erin McKeown in 2004:

Trashcan Sinatras in 2003:

Lawrence Welk Show featuring The Lennon Sisters (1956):

The version from The Jerk with Steve Martin and Bernadette Peters:

Got a uke handy? Learn the chords using this handy video.

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Pop Culture
How to Perform the Star Wars Theme—On Calculators
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

The iconic Star Wars theme has been recreated with glass harps, theremins, and even cat meows. Now, Laughing Squid reports that the team over at YouTube channel It’s a small world have created a version that can be played on calculators.

The channel’s math-related music videos feature covers of popular songs like Luis Fonsi’s "Despacito," Ed Sheeran’s "Shape of You," and the Pirates of the Caribbean theme, all of which are performed on two or more calculators. The Star Wars theme, though, is played across five devices, positioned together into a makeshift keyboard of sorts.

The video begins with a math-musician who transcribes number combinations into notes. Then, they break into an elaborate practice chord sequence on two, and then four, calculators. Once they’re all warmed up, they begin playing the epic opening song we all know and love, which you can hear for yourself in all its electronic glory below.

[h/t Laughing Squid]

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holidays
Bleat Along to Classic Holiday Tunes With This Goat Christmas Album
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Feeling a little Grinchy this month? The Sweden branch of ActionAid, an international charity dedicated to fighting global poverty, wants to goat—errr ... goad—you into the Christmas spirit with their animal-focused holiday album: All I Want for Christmas is a Goat.

Fittingly, it features the shriek-filled vocal stylings of a group of festive farm animals bleating out classics like “Jingle Bells,” “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” and “O Come All Ye Faithful.” The recording may sound like a silly novelty release, but there's a serious cause behind it: It’s intended to remind listeners how the animals benefit impoverished communities. Goats can live in arid nations that are too dry for farming, and they provide their owners with milk and wool. In fact, the only thing they can't seem to do is, well, sing. 

You can purchase All I Want for Christmas is a Goat on iTunes and Spotify, or listen to a few songs from its eight-track selection below.

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