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so_many_a_second

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so_many_a_second is a simple online applet that helps you visualize statistics. Most notably, it takes statistics in the form "x items used worldwide per second" and illustrates those items falling down a screen. So for example, 150 trees are cut per second according to Worldometers, and so_many_a_second visualizes that process thusly:

You can also do a split screen view comparing, say, trees cut per second versus babies born per second (4.2). That looks like this:

Trees and babies per second

You can even create your own views by plugging in a name, number of items per second, and an icon. It's an interesting way to visualize statistics -- putting an image to something that is very abstract for most of us. Go and click around!

See also: Visualizing Consumerism and Worldometers.

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Sylke Rohrlach, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0
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Animals
These Strange Sea Spiders Breathe Through Their Legs
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Sylke Rohrlach, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0

We know that humans breathe through their lungs and fish breathe through their gills—but where exactly does that leave sea spiders?

Though they might appear to share much in common with land spiders, sea spiders are not actually arachnids. And, by extension, they don't circulate blood and oxygen the way you'd expect them to, either.

A new study from Current Biology found that these leggy sea dwellers (marine arthropods of the class Pycnogonida) use their external skeleton to take in oxygen. Or, more specifically: They use their legs. The sea spider contracts its legs—which contain its guts—to pump oxygen through its body.

Somehow, these sea spiders hardly take the cake for Strangest Spider Alive (especially because they're not actually spiders); check out, for instance, our round-up of the 10 strangest spiders, and watch the video from National Geographic below:

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iStock
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Food
How to Make Perfect Fried Chicken, According to Chemistry
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iStock

Cooking amazing fried chicken isn’t just art—it’s also chemistry. Learn the science behind the sizzle by watching the American Chemical Society’s latest "Reactions" video below.

Host Kyle Nackers explains the three important chemical processes that occur as your bird browns in the skillet—hydrolysis, oxidation, and polymerization—and he also provides expert-backed cooking hacks to help you whip up the perfect picnic snack.

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