Ten Terrific Tubs

Last week, I wrote about bathtubs in history. This week, let's take a look at modern bathtubs that come in an amazing range of styles. And prices.

1. Illuminated Tub

The LTT illuminated bathtub by Jan Puylaert is a work of art, but it's also a functional  tub you can have in your bathroom for $1,499.00. The models with halogen lights are available in orange, yellow, pink, red, and white. Strange that it's pictured in green. Oh, and for an extra $1,000, you can get programmable multicolored LED lights.

2. Mobile Tub


Swedish designer Marie-Loise Gustafsson created this mobile bathtub for those who want a change of scenery when bathing. The tub us made from laminated fiberglass, and the front wheel swivels for steering. You'll have to fill it from some other faucet. Interior art by Elin Melberg.

3. Wooden Tub


I can't really wrap my mind around how a wooden tub will last over time, but there are plenty of wooden tub designs for sale. This Danish tub by Teak Tubs is made of teak wood treated with linseed oil.

4. Glass Tub


The Glass Tub is made of glass and stainless steel. The product page tells us that each unit is inspected for five hours with a magnifying glass. I would love to interview the person who has that job! Right now, this tub is on sale for half price, just $3,199.00.

5. Sunken Tub


Ah, the cache of a sunken tub! The Sorgente Bathtub from the Italian company Teuco implies luxury because of the space that must be allotted underneath the floor. A household with children and pets might have a free-for-all sliding across the floor into it!

6. Amethyst Tub


Italy takes bathing seriously. I found the finest luxury bathtubs at several Italian companies. There are plenty of fine expensive stone tubs made of granite and marble, but this one is pure amethyst! The Amaltea bathtub by Baldi will cost you $190,000. Then there's shipping.

7. Pod Tub


From yet another Italian company comes the Jacuzzi Morphosis Alpha. This two-person tub features hydrotherapy and hydromassage, meaning water jets. The arch that runs over it has lights, but no shower.

8. Bathtub Sofa


This is not exactly a tub. OK, it is, but it's used as a sofa, since it won't hold water in its current incarnation. Upholstery and pillows are included. Flavor Design makes these from antique tubs, so no two are alike.

9. Waterbirth Vessel


The item that inspired this post is not exactly available to the public. The Waterbirth Vessel is a conceptual specialty tub designed for obstetric wards for women to occupy during labor and delivery. It's a part of an entire birthing suite for hospitals. The tub, er, I mean vessel features an adjustable seat, grab bars, programmable water jets, and a jump seat for daddy. Designed by the group Darling Dushinka S.Gonzalez-Duskin.

10. Antique Tub


My dream bathtub is still the classic porcelain-glazed cast iron clawfoot tub, which I still don't have. But someday!

See also: Notable Bathtubs in History

Courtesy of Studio Segers
These Unique Benches Are Made From Yogurt Cups and Plastic Bags
Courtesy of Studio Segers
Courtesy of Studio Segers

When sent to a landfill, some plastic waste will sit there for centuries before breaking down. The Belgian design firm Studio Segers has found an alternative use for the plastic containers some people throw away by re-purposing them into innovative outdoor seating. This modular bench spotted by design milk is made from used yogurt cups, butter tubs, and plastic bags and is 100 percent recyclable.

Commissioned by the recycling company ECO-oh!, the H-bench consists of slender, plastic components. They come with or without backrests and are available in dark gray, medium gray, light gray, pastel green, pastel blue, and beige. Snap three of them together and you have a chair. Keep adding pieces to build a snug love-seat or a bench long enough to fit a crowd.

Recycled bench.
Courtesy of Studio Segers

The seat is designed to be customized to suit the user’s taste. Chair backs can face one way or alternating directions; the bench can feature multi-colored stripes or a uniform shade; one side can have seat backs while the opposite end is built for laying down.

The makers didn’t skimp on quality to make their product sustainable: The H-bench is made from plastics called polyolefins, which means it's durable enough to stay strong and vibrant even in harsh outdoor conditions. Get a closer look at the smart design in the video below.

[h/t design milk]

The Elements
Sit Down at a Periodic Table That Holds Samples of Every Element

The periodic table maps out the atomic numbers, electron configurations, and chemical properties of all the elements found on Earth (both in nature and in the lab). But have you ever wondered what a traditional periodic table would look like as a physical table? That’s the question Wolfram Research co-founder Theo Gray asked himself years ago, and the wooden Periodic Table Table was his answer.

As you can see in the video below from Reactions, the furniture piece he built at his office looks like something you might find in your dining room, albeit a little more educational. Its surface features dozens of wooden squares, each one etched with the information for a different element. Beneath each wooden panel, there's a compartment that contains a sample of that element from the real world.

Gray’s table includes straightforward examples of the elements, like a jar of mercury and a chunk of bismuth, as well as some more creative entries like an aluminum knee implant. The 2400-plus items in his collection have long since spilled beyond the table and onto his shelves. While many of the objects are stored within the table itself, in some cases, he has too many examples of one element to keep them in the same spot. Some, like the knee implant, are just too bulky to fit. Valuable elements like gold and dangerous items—like a radioactive bottle of the early 20th-century quack-medicine Radithor—are also kept in more secure locations.

Even Gray’s vast inventory reflects just a small slice of how we see the chemical elements manifested in everyday life. For more examples of where you can find elements in the world around you, check out this illustrated table.

[h/t Reactions]


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