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The Quick 10: Disney's Haunted Mansion

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Those of you who read my blog already know that I am a rather obsessive Haunted Mansion/Disney fan. In fact, as you read this, there's a chance that I'm at the Haunted Mansion right now"¦ I'm actually on vacation all this week and prepared the Q10s ahead of time. The Disney part is in my genetics "“ my mom is a pretty rabid fan and I grew up with pretty much all of the Mickey I could handle. I'm sure she questions where she went wrong with why I prefer 999 Happy Haunts to Snow White and the Seven Dwarves.

Anyway, I have lots of Haunted Mansion factoids buried in my brain, so I figured it's time to dig some of it up just in time for Halloween.

magic cart

1. Museum of the Weird. The original plans called for the Mansion to be a walk-through attraction and would include a section called The Museum of the Weird. Guests would wander through the spooky house and enjoy oddities such as this one: a magic cart that would roll to life all on its own at random intervals. The Museum was the pet project of Imagineer and Disney Legend Rolly Crump, but sadly, most of his ideas never made it to fruition because they wouldn't work if the ride wasn't a walk-through. He did reveal that the famous Haunted Mansion hidden faces wallpaper was based on one of his designs for the Museum, however. Photo: DoomBuggies.com

hatbox2. Hatbox Ghost. In California, there was an exceptionally creepy ghost in the attic for a very brief time period. He was an older gent holding a hatbox, and his head would periodically disappear from his neck and appear in the box he was holding instead. They had problems getting it to work consistently, though, and elected to remove him from the attic altogether. Photo: DoomBuggies.com

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3. Tombstones with a Purpose. While you're waiting in line for the big show at the Magic Kingdom, you can entertain yourself by reading the epitaphs on the tombstones. They're funny all on their own, but when you know that each one is tied to an Imagineer, they are even more interesting. X Atencio, who wrote the lyrics for "Grim Grinning Ghosts" (and had a hand in lots of other Disney awesomeness), also wrote the inscriptions, including his own.

There are quite a few stones, so I'll just give you a smattering of them. "Dear departed Brother Dave" is Dave Burkhart, who built the model of the Mansion; "Brother Claude" is Claude Coats, designer of the track layout; "Grandpa Marc" is Marc Davis, one of the main concept designers; "Dear sweet Leota" is Leota Toombs (seriously, Toombs), a Disney artist who was also the model for the head in the crystal ball.

4. Pepper's Ghost is an illusion used in magic tricks and theater. Basically, it's using plate glass and specific lighting to make objects appear to disappear and reappear, or morph into something else (it's more complicated than that, but you get the idea). The Haunted Mansion contains the world's largest case of the Pepper's Ghost technique "“ it's the entire ballroom scene. The reflections in the glass is what causes the appearance of ghosts in the room. If you're someone who likes to spot the inconsistencies in movies and the typos in my posts, you'll enjoy this: the Imagineers screwed up when designing the scene. They forgot to flip the ghosts to account for the reflection, so if you look at the dancing ghouls, you'll see that the ladies are actually leading the men instead of the other way around.

organ5. Recycling Organs. Not those type of organs "“ pipe organs. If you visit Disneyland in Anaheim, take a close look at the organ in the ballroom scene. It's the original prop from the 1954 Disney film 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. It used to belong to Captain Nemo, but now it's entertaining ghosts who are permanently partying. It fit in so perfectly that an exact replica was made for the Mansion at Disneyworld and Tokyo Disneyland. This photo is from DoomBuggies as well - click the link to learn more about the organ and how it was altered to fit in with its new home.

6. Is the Haunted Mansion really Haunted? Maybe. Personally, I think the atmosphere probably just lends itself to freaking out cast members who are there late at night closing by themselves. Then again, I've never worked there and experienced these things, so it's not really for me to say. One such ghost story is "The Man with the Cane". He makes his home at the Orlando manse and several cast members have reported seeing him. It always happens late at night to the person working at the part of the ride where people are loaded. One second, the Doom Buggies are flowing through, empty, and the next second, there's a thin, old man with a cane sitting in a buggy, staring straight ahead. The cast member attempts to say hello or make some sort of conversation, but the man doesn't acknowledge him or her "“ he just continues his journey through the room and on into the Mansion. Understandably freaked out, the cast member calls his or her supervisor and they wait for the man to come out at the end of the ride "“ but he never comes. Some say it was the ghost of Yale Gracey, one of the main Imagineers who worked on the project (Master Gracey, the man of the house, is named after him). You can find more stories about Haunted Mansion haunts at The Shadowlands (a great place if you have a few hours to waste).

7. A Real Final Resting Place. People dump ashes in the Haunted Mansion all of the time, Which lends some real credence to those haunting stories. You can read about one such instance here. Ash dumping happens so often that Disneyland had to purchase a special HEPA vacuum that can pick up ashes, but also little tiny bone fragments that are often left behind after a cremation. If you ever hear a Haunted Mansion cast member calling for a "HEPA clean-up," maybe you want to check out another attraction for a while and come back when the crew has tidied up a little.

8. Grim Grinning Ghosts. It's an undeniably catchy song with some really vivid imagery invoked in the lyrics. There might be a reason for that "“ the phrase "Grim Grinning Ghosts" first showed up in Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis. A sampling:

"Hard favour'd tyrant, ugly, meager, lean,
hateful divorce of love," - thus chudes she Death -
"Grim-grinning ghost, Earth's worm, What dost thou
mean
to stifle beauty and to steal his breath,"

But X Atencio swears he didn't rip the phrase off from Shakespeare. I was at a Haunted Mansion event in Disneyland in February (told you I was a Haunted Mansion geek) and X was in attendance, along with Harriet Burns, Blaine Gibson and Bob Gurr. Someone asked him where the phrase came from, and he grinned and replied, "It came from X Atencio!" But that's a pretty distinctive phrase"¦ my guess is that he probably read it somewhere a long time ago and absorbed it into his brain without even realizing.

9. The Knight in Shining Armor. If you've been on the ride, you probably remember the knight standing all by his lonesome in the hallway. And if you're paranoid, like me, you probably thought, "That would make a great place for a person to hide"¦" and then nervously wonder if it was going to come chasing after you. Well, you wouldn't be too far off the mark. It's not done anymore, but when the Mansion was newer, the Knight really did house a cast member who would run after Doom Buggies. It really freaked people out, and the knight constantly had to stop the ride when he was punched or spit on. One cast member who played the knight for a summer recalls that one of his co-workers had his nose broken. He also tells the story of having to tell a girl to put her top back on because she was in the middle of a steamy make out session with her boyfriend.

staff10. The Servant's Quarters. Showing Disney's amazing attention to detail, even a part of the house that is rarely seen is themed to the hilt. There's a little corridor that connects the outside exit hallway to the Parlor inside "“ I believe it's also the handicapped entrance. But what could have easily been a hallway with some funeral parlor-eqsue wallpaper is actually the Servant's Quarters, marked with a small sign shaped like a bat. There are bells that go to each person's chambers, each labeled with a room that pays tribute to an Imagineer. Some are repeats, so I'll just explain the ones I didn't talk about in the tombstone section. Ambassador Xavier's Lounging Lodge, Madame Leota's Boudoir, Grandfather McKim's Resting Room (Sam McKim, sketch artist), Uncle Davis' Sleeping Salon, Master Gracey's Bedchamber, Colonel Coats' Breakfast Berth and Professor Wathel's Reposing Lounge (Wathel Rogers, who designed and programmed lots of the audio-animatronics in the Mansion).

And, if you're a Disney fan and a BoingBoing fan, here's a treat: Haunted Mansion fan, BoingBoing founder and sci-fi author Cory Doctorow recounts his first Haunted Mansion experience for DoomBuggies.com. Oh, you know who else is a Haunted Mansion fan? NPH (Neil Patrick Harris). He was at the event I was at in February, which makes me like him even more than I already did.

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25 Benefits of Adopting a Rescue Dog
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According to the ASPCA, 3.3 million dogs enter shelters each year in the United States. Although that number has gone down since 2011 (from 3.9 million) there are still millions of dogs waiting in shelters for a forever home. October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month; here are 25 benefits of adopting a shelter dog.

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How Urban Legends Like 'The Licked Hand' Are Born
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If you compare the scary stories you heard as a kid with those of your friends—even those who grew up across the country from you—you’ll probably hear some familiar tales. Maybe you tried to summon Bloody Mary by chanting her name in front of the mirror three times in a dark bathroom. Maybe you learned never to wonder what’s under a woman’s neck ribbon. Maybe you heard the one about the girl who feels her dog lick her hand in the middle of the night, only to wake up to find him hanging dead from the shower nozzle, the words “humans can lick too” written on the wall in the dog’s blood.

These ubiquitous, spooky folk tales exist everywhere, and a lot of them take surprisingly similar forms. How does a single story like the one often called “Humans Can Lick Too” or "The Licked Hand" make its way into every slumber party in America? Thrillist recently investigated the question with a few experts, finding that most of these stories have very deep roots.

In the case of The Licked Hand, its origins go back more than a century. In the 1990s, Snopes found that a similar motif dates back to an Englishman’s diary entry from 1871. In it, the diary keeper, Dearman Birchall, retold a story he heard at a party of a man whose wife woke him up in the middle of the night, urging him to go investigate what sounded like burglars in their home. He told his wife that it was only the dog, reaching out his hand. He felt the dog lick his hand … but in the morning, all his valuables were gone: He had clearly been robbed.

A similar theme shows up in the short story “The Diary of Mr. Poynter,” published in 1919 by M.R. James. In it, a character dozes off in an armchair, and thinks that he is petting his dog. It turns out, it’s some kind of hairy human figure that he flees from. The story seems to have evolved from there into its presently popular form, picking up steam in the 1960s. As with any folk tale, its exact form changes depending on the teller: sometimes the main character is an old lady, other times it’s a young girl.

You’ll probably hear these stories in the context of happening to a “friend of a friend,” making you more likely to believe the tale. It practically happened to someone you know! Kind of! The setting, too, is probably somewhere nearby. It might be in your neighborhood, or down by the local railroad tracks.

Thrillist spoke to Dr. Joseph Stubbersfield, a researcher in the UK who studies urban legends, who says the kind of stories that spread widely contain both social information and emotional resonance. Meaning they contain a message—you never know who’s lurking in your house—and are evocative.

If something is super scary or gross, you want to share it. Stories tend to warn against something: A study of English-language urban legends circulating online found that most warned listeners about the hazards of life (poisonous plants, dangerous animals, dangerous humans) rather than any kind of opportunities. We like to warn each other of the dangers that could be lurking around every corner, which makes sense considering our proven propensity to focus on and learn from negative information. And yes, that means telling each other to watch out for who’s licking our hands in the middle of the night.

Just something to keep in mind as you eagerly await Jezebel’s annual scary story contest.

[h/t Thrillist]

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