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Morbid Home Decor

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Over a year ago, I posted Killer Home Decor and found out how many of you have a subversive, or even a morbid sense of humor in furnishing your homes. This is the long overdue continuation of that post, with more ways for you to impress visitors to your home. These products will give them either smiles on their faces or chills down their backs!

Roadkill Carpet

Ew, what's that on your rug? Studio OOOMS has a handmade 100% wool carpet that looks beautiful, except for that 100% wool flattened bloody fox!

Mr. Suicide Bath Plug

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The Mr. Suicide bath plug was designed by Massimo Giacon for Alessi. The little guy attached to a chain and a "weight" (the plug itself) comes in three colors. As long as the stopper is in the drain, he'll be held under the bath water.

Dead Fred Penholder

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Dead Fred is a penholder. Not only is the sight of an ink pen (or pencil) stuck through Fred's heart a real conversation starter, it also keeps your writing instrument where you can find it.

Hanged Man Lamp

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Shine a little light in the darkness with the Hanged Man Lamp by enPieza. Made of treated iron, this little guy will impress your guests, or else scare them off. But you can assure them that you bought it only because it reminded you of your favorite word game.

Nuclear Waste Containers

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Nothing says "hands off" like a nuclear symbol. These Atomic Food Containers come in a set of three sizes with lids and ominous warnings. Great for leftovers or for taking your lunch to work.

Coffin Table

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The Memento Coffee Table Casket is designed to be both a coffee table and a coffin!

Made from an intentional choice of materials, this "pine box" puts design in context of the user at different stages of life, and death. In life, Memento serves the user as a functional piece of furniture that stores the material possessions we choose to collect. When the inevitable occurs, this coffee table takes on a second life as a non-toxic burial vessel.

Coffin Couch

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Coffin Couches are made from 18 gauge steel coffins collected from Southern California funeral homes. They are embossed with the universal biohazard symbol due to contact with a deceased body. They come in all manner of colors and can be customized to your taste.

Knife Hooks

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It appears as if someone has thrown a knife from a distance and it lodged in your wall. But these knifes are screw-in hooks you can hang a coat or hat on!

Crime Scene Scarf

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Not necessarily a home decor item, but I couldn't resist including the crime scene scarf called Fuzz. Knitted from acrylic and spandex; designed by Michelle Kempner. If you want to incorporate crime scene tape into your home decor, you might try the toilet paper version.
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See quite a few additional deliciously morbid touches for your home in the post Killer Home Decor.

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IKEA
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Animals
Get IKEA's New Pet Furniture Collection for Not a Lot of Scratch
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IKEA

The biggest surprise about IKEA's newest product line is that it has taken this long to debut. This week, the North American arm of the Swedish furniture giant unveiled a new assortment of furniture designed specifically for four-legged customers. Dubbed LURVIG (Swedish for “hairy”), pet owners can now browse IKEA aisles for everything from dog beds to cat scratching posts—many of which have a distinct IKEA twist.

Their pet couch ($49.95), for example, folds out into a bed; another bed is small enough to slide under a human-sized mattress. Their “cat house on legs” ($54.95) looks like a retro TV and allows space for a cat to stalk you from behind a screen.

An assortment of IKEA pet furniture
IKEA

The retailer solicited advice from veterinarians on product design that would be functional while sitting comfortably within the IKEA aesthetic. “It is quite important for IKEA to have a pet range that fits into our normal furniture range,” Barbara Schäfer, IKEA’s product risk assessment leader, told Curbed. “As a pet owner I can say, so far, the normal pet products are quite ugly.” (Don't hold back, Barbara.)

The LURVIG line is currently being rolled out to IKEA stores, but you’ll have to be willing to be your furry pal’s personal shopper; the company doesn’t allow pets in their stores, save for service animals.

[h/t Curbed]

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IKEA
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Design
IKEA’s New Augmented Reality App Lets You Test Out Virtual Furniture in Your Home
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IKEA

No matter how much measuring and research you do beforehand, buying a piece of furniture without knowing what it will look like in your home is always a gamble. With its new augmented reality app, IKEA hopes to take some of the guesswork out of the process. IKEA Place features more than 2000 items in the Swedish retailer's inventory, and visualizing them in the space where you live is as easy as tapping a button.

As WIRED reports, IKEA Place is among the first apps to take advantage of Apple's ARKit, an augmented reality platform that debuted as part of iOS 11. iPhone and iPad owners with the latest update can download IKEA's new app for free and start browsing through home goods right away.

To use the tool, you must first select the product you wish to test out, whether it's a loveseat, a kitchen table, or a dresser. Then, with the camera activated, you can point your device at whichever space you want the item to fill and watch it appear on the screen in front of you.

According to IKEA, the 3D models are scaled with 98 percent accuracy. Factors that are hard to analyze from photos online, like shadows, lighting, and textures, are also depicted as they would appear in real life. So if a sofa that looks great under the lights of a store looks drab in your living room, or if a desk that seems tiny online doesn't fit inside your office, the app will let you know. It's the closest you can get to seeing how a piece of furniture complements a room without lugging it through the doorway.

IKEA isn't the first company to improve interior design with computerized images. Several hardware stores and furniture outlets offer their own AR apps. Other services like Modsy let customers pay to create full virtual models of their homes before populating them with 3D furniture. Even IKEA had a basic AR app prior to this one, but it was glitchy and not always accurate. This newest iteration aims to provide a more seamless shopping experience. And with the latest iOS update placing a greater emphasis on AR, you can expect to see more apps using the technology in the near future.

[h/t WIRED]

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