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4 Reasons You Must Watch HBO's "John Adams"

At last night's Emmy Awards, HBO's John Adams miniseries won a boatload of awards. It's out on DVD now, and I enjoyed the heck out of it when it aired on HBO earlier this year. It's must-watch material for anyone with a keen interest in American history, and "should-watch" material for everyone else. Here are a few reasons why I think you should give it a look.

1. It's the Emmy-Winningest Miniseries of All Time

John Adams won a staggering thirteen Emmies, which makes it the biggest winner in miniseries history. Among the honors it received were Outstanding Miniseries, Outstanding Writing (Kirk Ellis), and both Lead Actor and Lead Actress (in a Miniseries of Movie) awards for Paul Giamatti and Laura Linney. Tom Wilkinson also got a Best Supporting Actor award for his portrayal of Benjamin Franklon. If that's not enough, go read the full list of awards at Wikipedia. (While you're there, check out the list of historical inaccuracies in the miniseries.)

2. A "Low Talker" With a Lot to Say

You can easily tell from the trailer that Paul Giamatti's performance as John Adams, while excellent, is sort of hard to hear. There's a lot of mumbling and whispering going on, even in scenes where you'd expect shouting (for example, in courtrooms). If you're a mumblephobe like me, just turn on your TV's closed captioning (or subtitles on the DVD) to catch the dialog -- trust me, it helps. For a taste of Giamatti's low talking, here's the trailer:

3. It Humanizes the American Revolution

The events of the American Revolution are truly remote to most Americans today -- a few hundred years will tend to do that. HBO sought to made a miniseries of huge scale and budget (over $100 million) that still focused on the core drama of the personal lives of John and Abigail Adams and their children. By examining the story of the Revolution on two scales: the national political struggle, as well as its personal cost to a family, the miniseries succeeds in explaining why Adams was such an interesting guy. (He was also kind of a jerk, especially to his kids, but perhaps you'll give him points for public service.) But seriously, there's a lot to digest in this collision of public and private life -- Adams keeps finding himself torn between duties to country and duties to family, and he really does have to choose one (as duty to country often means being on another continent for years, as well as braving dangerous ocean voyages, wars, disease, and so on).

4. Tom Hanks Does Great TV

Tom Hanks was Executive Producer (with Gary Goetzman) for the miniseries. Hanks has been involved with a ton of good television in recent years, including Band of Brothers, From the Earth to the Moon, and even Big Love. Check out this video to hear Hanks and writer David McCullough talk about the making of the miniseries:

Have I convinced you to "John or Die?" You can get a copy of the miniseries on DVD at Amazon for under $40. It's also available on Netflix (three-disc series).

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History
A Brief History of Time
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You may have heard that time is a social construct, but that doesn’t stop it from having consequences in the real world. If you show up to a party 10 minutes before it’s scheduled to start, you’ll likely be the first one there, and if you arrive to an interview 10 minutes late, you likely won’t get the job. But how did humanity agree on when and how to observe certain times of day?

In their new video, the It’s Okay to Be Smart team explains how humans “invented” the modern concept of time. The increments we use to measure time, like seconds, minutes, and hours, come from the ancient civilizations of the Egyptians and the Babylonians. Early clocks, like sundials and water clocks, were pretty crude, so people couldn’t pinpoint a time like noon down to the second even if they wanted to. But as clocks became more accurate, the problem wasn’t being unable to tell time accurately, but deciding which clocks qualified as “accurate” in the first place.

In 1884, President Chester A. Arthur organized the International Meridian Conference with the intention of deciding on a uniform definition of time to be followed around the world. The attendees ended up choosing the meridian running through Greenwich, England as the official Prime Meridian, and all clocks would be measured against the clock in the town’s observatory. Greenwich Mean Time is still used as the standard world time today.

Check out the full story below.

[h/t It’s Okay to Be Smart]

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Big Questions
Why Do Baseball Managers Wear Uniforms?
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Basketball and hockey coaches wear business suits on the sidelines. Football coaches wear team-branded shirts and jackets and often ill-fitting pleated khakis. Why are baseball managers the only guys who wear the same outfit as their players?

According to John Thorn, the official historian of Major League Baseball since 2011, it goes back to the earliest days of the game. Back then, the person known as the manager was the business manager: the guy who kept the books in order and the road trips on schedule. Meanwhile, the guy we call the manager today, the one who arranges the roster and decides when to pull a pitcher, was known as the captain. In addition to managing the team on the field, he was usually also on the team as a player. For many years, the “manager” wore a player’s uniform simply because he was a player. There were also a few captains who didn’t play for the team and stuck to making decisions in the dugout, and they usually wore suits.

With the passing of time, it became less common for the captain to play, and on most teams they took on strictly managerial roles. Instead of suits proliferating throughout America’s dugouts, though, non-playing captains largely hung on to the tradition of wearing a player's uniform. By the early to mid 20th century, wearing the uniform was the norm for managers, with a few notable exceptions. The Philadelphia Athletics’s Connie Mack and the Brooklyn Dodgers’s Burt Shotton continued to wear suits and ties to games long after it fell out of favor (though Shotton sometimes liked to layer a team jacket on top of his street clothes). Once those two retired, it’s been uniforms as far as the eye can see.

The adherence to the uniform among managers in the second half of the 20th century leads some people to think that MLB mandates it, but a look through the official major league rules [PDF] doesn’t turn up much on a manager’s dress. Rule 1.11(a) (1) says that “All players on a team shall wear uniforms identical in color, trim and style, and all players’ uniforms shall include minimal six-inch numbers on their backs" and rule 2.00 states that a coach is a "team member in uniform appointed by the manager to perform such duties as the manager may designate, such as but not limited to acting as base coach."

While Rule 2.00 gives a rundown of the manager’s role and some rules that apply to them, it doesn’t specify that they’re uniformed. Further down, Rule 3.15 says that "No person shall be allowed on the playing field during a game except players and coaches in uniform, managers, news photographers authorized by the home team, umpires, officers of the law in uniform and watchmen or other employees of the home club." Again, nothing about the managers being uniformed.

All that said, Rule 2.00 defines the bench or dugout as “the seating facilities reserved for players, substitutes and other team members in uniform when they are not actively engaged on the playing field," and makes no exceptions for managers or anyone else. While the managers’ duds are never addressed anywhere else, this definition does seem to necessitate, in a roundabout way, that managers wear a uniform—at least if they want to have access to the dugout. And, really, where else would they sit?

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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