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Incredible Deep-Sea Creatures

Although the presentation was given ten years ago (the presenters start by cracking jokes about the then-current box office hit Titanic), ocean explorer David Gallo has some amazing video of animals and other interesting stuff in the deep sea. The thirteen-minute presentation is crammed full of video showing strange octopods, colorful jellyfish, beautiful tubeworms (including a worm fight!), and scary fish -- but there's also some really interesting video of deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The vents are surprisingly active, showing clouds of sulfurous volcanic crud pouring out. Despite this seemingly toxic environment, there's a thriving ecosystem surrounding the vents -- and Gallo has video to prove it.

If you've ever wondered what's down there, check out this video!

(Note: most of this video seems to have been taken by the Jason ROV that was made famous by Bob Ballard's Titanic investigation. (Well, okay, Ballard used Jason Jr., a prototype of Jason, but it was pretty much the same thing.)

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Sylke Rohrlach, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0
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Animals
These Strange Sea Spiders Breathe Through Their Legs
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Sylke Rohrlach, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0

We know that humans breathe through their lungs and fish breathe through their gills—but where exactly does that leave sea spiders?

Though they might appear to share much in common with land spiders, sea spiders are not actually arachnids. And, by extension, they don't circulate blood and oxygen the way you'd expect them to, either.

A new study from Current Biology found that these leggy sea dwellers (marine arthropods of the class Pycnogonida) use their external skeleton to take in oxygen. Or, more specifically: They use their legs. The sea spider contracts its legs—which contain its guts—to pump oxygen through its body.

Somehow, these sea spiders hardly take the cake for Strangest Spider Alive (especially because they're not actually spiders); check out, for instance, our round-up of the 10 strangest spiders, and watch the video from National Geographic below:

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iStock
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Food
How to Make Perfect Fried Chicken, According to Chemistry
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iStock

Cooking amazing fried chicken isn’t just art—it’s also chemistry. Learn the science behind the sizzle by watching the American Chemical Society’s latest "Reactions" video below.

Host Kyle Nackers explains the three important chemical processes that occur as your bird browns in the skillet—hydrolysis, oxidation, and polymerization—and he also provides expert-backed cooking hacks to help you whip up the perfect picnic snack.

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