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The Weird Week in Review

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Nude Hiker Vows to Do It Again

German janitor Siegfried Grawert was arrested for public nudity while campaigning for the right to hike naked. He was jailed for ten days because he refused to pay the 500 euro fine. Grawert told a local newspaper he planned to continue participating in organized nude hikes. Germany is tolerant of nude bathing, but less so of hiking and jogging in the buff.

Fisherman Hooks Himself

Fisherman Peter Inskip cast his line towards a lake near his home in Uxbridge, England and caught it in some brush. When he tried to pull it out, the lure snapped back at him and the lead fishing weight embedded itself into his chest! He could feel the weight in the back of his throat as paramedics rushed him to the hospital. Surgeons removed the weight, breaking his breastbone in the process and leaving him with six stitches. They said he was lucky he hadn't nicked an artery. Inskip plans to fish again as soon as he is able.
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"It hasn't put me off one bit. The biggest downside is I'll probably never catch anything that big again."

Attempted Murder by Haunted House

38-year-old Sean A. Jennings of Spokane, Washington was sentenced to 12 years for trying to murder his wife. Last October, he called his wife out to the garage to see a haunted house he had arranged. He blindfolded her, telling her it was a surprise, then placed a noose around her neck. The woman lost consciousness before Jennings released her. When she came to, he advised her to hide the wound with a neck brace. The divorce was final a month later. Jennings pleaded guilty to second-degree attempted murder in a plea bargain.

Cow Stuck in Washer

150stuckcow.jpgA curious heifer in Cornwall got more than she bargained for when she stuck her head inside an abandoned washing machine. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals responded to a call and found the cow with the machine's drum completely encasing her head. RSPCA inspector David Hobbs freed the animal, and issued a statement about the irresponsibility of those who dump appliances instead of taking them to an approved landfill.

Stiletto Sprint

A $5,000 cash prize drew hundreds of women and several men to race in high heels down the street in Sydney, Australia last weekend. The 80-meter dash resulted in sore feet, twisted ankles, and a big pileup out of the starting gate. The winner was 18-year-old Brittney McGlone of Braidwood. The 265 people who ran set a record previously held by Holland, where 150 high-heeled runners participated in a similar event.

Woman "In Shock" Over 6-foot Zucchini

150zucchini.jpgApollonia Castitlione of Queens, New York grows zucchini every year, along with tomatoes and string beans. She's grown 4-foot zucchini before, but never anything as long as the 6-foot vegetable still growing in her garden. Castitlione posed with the zucchini, which is taller than she is, and said she would save the seeds to plant next year.
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"It's so straight, it's so perfect. Usually, some are really crooked."*

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The world record for zucchini is 7 feet, ten inches.

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Little Baby's Ice Cream
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Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
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Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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iStock
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Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
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iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

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