The Weekend Links

Looking to get involved in the political process? How about fool some friends into thinking you're a grassroots phenomenon?
"¢ Copy and paste this URL into your browser: http://www.thelopezfamilyonline.com/play.php?first=FIRST&LASTNAME
"¢ Next, replace FIRST&LASTNAME with your name - in my case, it would be Allison%20Keene (the %20 will add the space).
"¢ Press enter or whatever you need to load the site, click on the video, and voila! Watch the magic!
(Thanks Jan!)

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Tired of waiting in long lines at the fair ground or Six Flags? You could always build your own rollercoaster ... although I wouldn't recommend it. (Thanks to Martha for that gem)

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If you're looking to make an impression with clients or potential beaux, check out some of these clever business cards, courtesy of Larry's blog.

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Suffering from Olympic withdrawal? Check out this Olympic photoshop contest that manages to bring Beijing and backflips to some well known art.

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If ever there was a proper usage of "zomg," it would be to describe this table.

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Apparently this completely unfathomably cool fountain is from Canal City in Fukuoka, Japan. Word is there are similar fountains other places ... anyone seen one in person? This one still baffles me.

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10 unbelievable medical conditions. I think at least 5 of these have so far been featured on Grey's Anatomy, and I'm sure the rest will make it on at some point.

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I'm pretty sure this vintage ad sparked the idea for the Honda Element, the "hose off the inside" car.

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From the AV Club, 26 evil, awful, or just plain stupid educators in TV and film. (I'm really happy they included Olivier from Six Feet Under on this list)

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Some things really do get lost in translation - see for yourself here. On a side note, I once heard a long time ago some songwriter saying they used an online translator to send their lyrics from English to another language and back to English. Apparently it made them more poetic. I still don't think it would help my terrible attempts at song writing, but maybe I'll give it a go!

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Having trouble jump starting your art? Start with a Rorschach blot and then fill it in like this artist, who achieved amazing results. (This post approved by Rorschach)

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A visual illusion
regarding color cubes.

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1-burger.jpg

When they say to eat fast food in moderation ... is this what they mean?

From Eric, a great Gremlins fan video. Gremlins are not to be confused with Critters. Bonus: can anyone name the A-List actor and former hearthrob who had a role in Critters 3?

I'll let you guys do your own hunting on this one - a list of crazy flash sites that will, apparently, "warp your mind." In my experience, that can sometimes be true.

Seen anything fun, crazy, smart or shocking on the internet? Send it my way! FlossyLinks@gmail.com

[Last Weekend's Links]

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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