10 Fast Facts About Wrigley Field

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iStock

Originally opened in 1914, Chicago's Wrigley Field—home of the Chicago Cubs—is the second oldest ballpark in America (second only to Boston's Fenway Park). So it's hardly surprising that the field, which was renamed after chewing gum magnate William Wrigley Jr. (who bought the baseball club in 1918 and renamed the park in 1927) is steeped in history. Here are 10 things everyone ought to know about this jewel box park.

1. THE FAMOUS IVY BACKDROP WAS PLANTED IN 1937.

In 1937, Bill Veeck Jr., the son of the Cubs's president, planted ivy vines against the outfield wall. It was originally 350 Japanese bittersweet plants and 200 Boston ivy plants, but the Boston ivy eventually took over. If a ball gets lost in the ivy, it's considered a ground-rule double as long as the outfielder raises his hands to indicate that the ball is lost. If he doesn't, it's considered fair play.

2. THE SCOREBOARD HAS BEEN AROUND SINCE 1937, TOO.

The old-school scoreboard is also still manually operated. Despite its prominent placement, it has never been struck with a batted ball. Golfer Sam Snead teed off from home plate and hit it once, though.

3. THERE ARE RULES FOR HOME RUN BALLS.

A Cubs fan throws a home run ball back at Wrigley Field
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

When a player for the Cubs hits a home run, the lucky fan who catches the ball doesn't take it home as a souvenir: tradition dictates that he or she return it to the player. (Cubs fans are thoughtful like that.) If it's a player on the opposing team who hits the tater, it will usually be promptly thrown back onto the field (even if the person who catches it is outside of the stadium).

4. WRIGLEY FIELD USED TO BE WEEGHMAN PARK.

Chewing gum magnate William Wrigley was an investor in the Cubs and kept increasing his shares, then eventually bought out Weeghman in 1918. He was full owner by 1921 and expanded the park in 1922.

5. LIGHTS WEREN'T ADDED TO WRIGLEY UNTIL 1988.

On August 8, 1988, Wrigley Field was lit up for the first time. They were scheduled to be added in the early 1940s, but one day after the attack on Pearl Harbor, P.K. Wrigley donated 165 tons of steel to the war effort instead. The City of Chicago issued an ordinance against night games at Wrigley because the lights would be distracting to people that actually lived in the neighborhood, but the organization and the city came to an agreement in time for the 1988 season.

6. THE FIRST NIGHT GAME AT WRIGLEY FIELD GOT RAINED OUT.

The first night game was supposed to be against the Phillies, but it got rained out. While waiting on the rain delay, some of the Cubs took the opportunity to act out a scene from Bull Durham and played slip-and-slide on the tarp covering the field. The players who participated were fined $500 each.

7. IT'S ONE OF THE ONLY BALLPARKS WHERE NEIGHBORHOOD RESIDENTS CAN SIT ON THEIR ROOFS AND WATCH THE GAME.

Cubs fans sit on rooftops across from Wrigley Field in Chicago
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

This wasn't really a problem for the Cubs organization until the 1990s, when owners of the apartments built bleachers on their roofs and started charging people to come watch the game from their stands. The owners of the apartments agreed to share some of the proceeds with the Cubs and the Cubs agreed not to block the view with a fence. The team's owners have also scooped up some of these apartment buildings for themselves on occasion.

8. THE BEARS PLAYED AT WRIGLEY FIELD FROM 1921 TO 1970.

They were called the Staleys for the first season, but then renamed themselves to coordinate with the Cubs.

9. HARRY CARAY'S FAMOUS SEVENTH-INNING STRETCH RENDITION OF "TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALL GAME" ALMOST NEVER HAPPENED.

While Harry Caray was still announcing for the White Sox, radio producer and broadcaster Jay Scott approached him about singing the song for the audience, but Caray declined. So, during one game, Scott turned the mikes on in the announcer's booth without telling Caray and a tradition was born—a tradition that Caray brought with him to Wrigley Field when he became the team's official broadcaster in 1982.

10. BABE RUTH'S FAMOUS CALLED SHOT HAPPENED AT WRIGLEY.

During the 1932 World Series, The Babe pointed to centerfield to indicate exactly where he was going to hammer the next ball. And he did. It's much argued among baseball fans as to whether Ruth actually called the shot or if he was pointing at the pitcher or simply gesturing toward the Cubs's bench. Whatever he did, he did it at Wrigley.

5 Game of Thrones Characters Who Need to Survive the Final Season

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

"When you play the Game of Thrones, you either win or you die."

These words have haunted Game of Thrones ever since Ned Stark, the assumed protagonist of the show, was killed off in the first season of HBO's fantasy epic. You either win or you die. Even if you're a main character, even if you're a likable character, even if you're a sympathetic character. Nobody is safe. With the eighth and final season on its way, the question everyone is asking is: Who will survive to see the end of the series?

While leaks, intentional and otherwise, have confirmed that Jorah Mormont will likely live, it can be safely assumed that someone as evil as Cersei Lannister will probably (hopefully) be killed off. Here are the people who will most likely tell the Many Faced God "Not today."

1. TYRION LANNISTER

Peter Dinklage in 'Game of Thrones'
HBO

Fans have literally threatened to riot if ​Tyrion Lannister dies. Undoubtedly the most popular character the show has presented, Tyrion's transformation wouldn't be complete if he were killed off. And at this point, watching him triumph against all odds and conquer his family's legacy is half the reason to watch the show. If anyone can win the Game of Thrones, he can—even if he has teased otherwise.

2. LORD VARYS

Conleth Hill as Lord Varys in 'Game of Thrones'
Helen Sloan, HBO

While even purely political players in the Game of Thrones can be killed off, Lord Varys has always kept a healthy distance between himself and anything even resembling action. He always plays on his own terms and makes sure he has an exit strategy at all times. If anything manages to kill him, it better be some huge, shocking event, because he's not going to die from just anything.

3. SAMWELL TARLY

John Bradley as Samwell Tarly in 'Game of Thrones'
Helen Sloan, HBO

​Many people have noticed how the loyal Samwell Tarly is more or less a self-insert character ​meant to represent author George R.R. Martin. While it's entirely possible Samwell might get a hero's death by sacrificing himself to save Gilly and Baby Sam, Martin still has huge sway over the show, and it's unlikely he'd let them kill "him" off.

4. JON SNOW

Kit Harington in 'Game of Thrones'
HBO

Not only has Jon Snow already died and come back from the dead, but he's been the de facto protagonist of the series since his not-daddy Ned Stark was killed off all the way back in season one. And while the series clearly has no qualms about killing off main characters, the huge reveal of his actual parentage is too big for the show to just kill him off right afterwards.

5. SANSA STARK

Sophie Turner in 'Game of Thrones'
HBO

Of the three remaining Stark siblings, Sansa seems to be the most likely to get out of the show alive. Apart from actress Sophie Turner inadvertently giving away her character's fate with a tattoo, her survival is all but guaranteed because her special skill, a political instinct she learned from Littlefinger, is perfectly suited to allow her to maneuver herself into a secure position.

5 Dog Breeds That Get Along With Cats

iStock/chendongshan
iStock/chendongshan

Dogs and cats may be seen as common enemies, but it does not have to be that way. If you're a strategic pet parent, you can add a cat into your dog family, or vice versa, seamlessly. here are plenty of dogs out there that would make a wonderful—and friendly—companion for your cat. Here are five of the best breeds for that.

1. JAPANESE CHINS

Japanese Chin against a burgundy background
iStock/Dixi_

​Japanese Chins are the perfect dogs for your pet. The breed has even been described as a ​"cat in a dog suit" because of their acrobatic abilities and cat-like agility. ​Animal Planet describes these dogs as even-tempered and adaptable to new members in the family. They're also playful, mischievous, smart, determined, and affectionate.

2. GOLDEN RETRIEVERS

Friendly Golden Retriever looks at the camera
iStock/KalebKroetsch

These ​furry friends are as playful as it gets, but more importantly they're a versatile breed, so they know how to adapt to different friends they meet, including cats of all sizes and ages. Golden retrievers are very unlikely to be rough with your cat, even when playing, and will just consider the cat a part of its family. There's no jealousy on the part o these dogs.

3. PAPILLONS

Papillon and a cat snuggle under a blanket
iStock/yykkaa

​Papillons are the dog versions of your friend who invites you to every social gathering. They have a ​"more the merrier" attitude, meaning they welcome any and all friends. These social butterflies are quick to befriend any and all creatures, cats included.

4. LABRADOR RETRIEVERS

Black Labrador Retriever and a cat share a couch
iStock/Willowpix

A Labrador retriever grows to be pretty huge, there's no denying that, but that does not spell disaster for a cat-dog relationship. Labrador retrievers are very outgoing, but at the same time very gentle, and get along well with cats.

5. BEAGLES

A Beagle and a cat cuddle together
iStock/kobkik

Beagles are an easy choice to add to the family. According to the American Kennel Club, beagles are very friendly around all animals, and have an easygoing demeanor. Despite the fact you may see a beagle chase a cat outside from time to time, indoors, they won't keep that same energy. Inside, they play well with others, and will live peacefully—and possibly even snuggle—with cats.

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