Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

The Quick 10: 10 Things You Didn't Know About Mr. Wizard

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

1. He acted with Nancy Reagan (then Nancy Davis) in 1940 as an actor at the Coach House summer theater.

2. After summer theater he decided to go pro - when he graduated LaCrosse State Teacher's College in Wisconsin in 1940, he headed to NYC to pursue a career on Broadway.

3. His Broadway dreams were interrupted when WWII happened and he decided to serve his country as a private in the Army Air Forces. He was a B-24 bomber pilot and flew 56 missions. By the time he was discharged in 1945, he was a Captain and had earned the Distinguished Flying Cross.

4. Although a lot of us probably know him from Mr. Wizard's World, the idea actually started with a 1951 T.V. show called Watch Mr. Wizard. Among other prestigious awards, the show won a Peabody and three Thomas Alva Edison National Mass Media Awards.

5. Don Herbert and his wife developed a traveling assembly program featuring young performers teaching students about science. It's estimated that the show was presented to about 1.2 million students every year.

6. Some of Mr. Wizard's shows included teaching kids why cakes rise, how to cook a hot dog by electrocuting it and showing how centrifugal force worked by using a bucket of water.

7. He took notes on every experiment and never threw them out - he ended up with at least 18 cabinets full of notes.

8. He was a fairly frequent guest on Hollywood Squares during the 1986 season. I so would have called on Mr. Wizard - you know he knew his stuff.

9. You know the Diet Coke and Mentos geyser? The man responsible for the 18-foot record, Steve Spangler, was inspired to start his career in science by none other than Mr. Wizard.

10. The educational show Beakman's World had a little homage to Mr. Wizard: the two penguin puppets on the show were named Don and Herb.

Do you have a favorite Mr. Wizard experiment? Share it in the comments.

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TASCHEN
Everything You Need to Know About Food in One Book
TASCHEN
TASCHEN

If you find yourself mixing up nigiri and sashimi at sushi restaurants or don’t know which fruits are in season, then this is the book for you. Food & Drink Infographics, published by TASCHEN, is a colorful and comprehensive guide to all things food and drink.

The book combines tips and tricks with historical context about the ways in which different civilizations illustrated and documented the foods they ate, as well as how humans went from hunter-gatherers to modern-day epicureans. As for the infographics, there’s a helpful graphic explaining the number of servings provided by different cake sizes, a heat index of various chilies, a chart of cheeses, and a guide to Italian cold cuts, among other delectable charts.

The 480-page coffee table book, which can be purchased on Amazon for $56, is written in three languages: English, French, and German. The infographics themselves come from various sources, and the text is provided by Simone Klabin, a New York City-based writer and lecturer on film, art, culture, and children’s media.

Keep scrolling to see a few of the infographics featured in the book.

An infographic about cheese
TASCHEN

An infographic about cakes
Courtesy of TASCHEN

An infographic about fruits in season
Courtesy of TASCHEN

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