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Speedy Facts About Speeding Tickets

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It always amazes me when I hear someone say they've never been pulled over for speeding. My reaction is usually wow, I'd never want to be stuck behind you in traffic. As for me, I've gotten all manner of them: the 20mph-over on the interstate, the 2mph-over hick town speed trap, the stern warning (becoming rarer as I get older), but recently I got a totally new and unexpected kind, and I'm not quite sure what to do about it -- the international speeding ticket.

I spent a few weeks driving around New Zealand last month, where the roads are long and open, sheep outnumber people (and cars) 4-to-1, and the maximum speed limit is 100km/h. That's about 62mp/h, which is about as fast as we back out of our driveways here in LA. But I was very conscientious about not speeding in towns or around other cars, and I never attracted the attention of any Kiwi cops. Good on yer, I thought. Until I got a letter from New Zealand in the mail yesterday. Apparently they have robot cameras staged in remote areas of the country, and can zap you anytime, anywhere. Which raises a thorny new question for me: do I really have to pay this? I mean, what are they going to do, extradite me? I did a fair amount of Googling to help answer that question, but I couldn't come up with any firm answers. Also, they got my name wrong on the ticket, though they clearly have my address. (Any knowledge or ideas from our readers would be much appreciated.) What I did find, however, were lots of fun facts about speeding tickets:

The first speeding ticket was issued to Harry Myers of Dayton, Ohio in 1904, for going twelve miles per hour. I'm assuming they didn't use a radar to figure out his speed.

The ticket for the fastest speeder was given to a man going 272mph in a 75 zone. Apparently he was part of a San Francisco-to-Miami rally called the Gumball 3000, and he was driving an exotic, Swedish-built Koenigsegg. The fastest motorcycle caught speeding was going 205 in a 65, and was ticketed not only for reckless driving, but riding without a motorcycle license. Ouch. The officer who caught him said "I had to double-check my watch because in 27 years I'd never seen anything move that fast.''

A possibly apocryphal story about boxer Jack Johnson getting a speeding ticket has him giving the officer $100 for a $50 fine, because "I'll be coming back through just as fast."

The fastest speeder in the UK was Timothy Brady, caught driving his Porsche at 172mph in 2007. He was jailed for 10 weeks and banned from driving for 3 years.

Sharing time! What's the worst ticket you've ever gotten?

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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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