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How To Dance While Barely Moving: the "Fishstick"

It's a big deal when a new dance is invented. Whether it's the Lindy Hop, the Electric Slide, or the immortal Crank That (Soulja Boy), a new dance can invigorate a nation and bring us together. So I kindly offer you the next dance craze sweeping the nation: the Fishstick.

The Fishstick was invented last week by dance experts Adam Lisagor, Merlin Mann, and Scott Simpson on their podcast You Look Nice Today (warning: some profanity and fart jokes). The Fishstick has simple rules:

1. Beginners should perform the Fishstick to the tune "Tighten Up" by Archie Bell & the Drells. "For presentation and learning purposes, you would want ['Tighten Up'] going." -Adam Lisagor

2. The Fishstick should be subtle. "Unless you're really staring at someone doing the Fishstick, you wouldn't know that they were dancing." -Scott Simpson; "...the Fishstick is mostly happening in your head." -Merlin Mann

3. Performances may look like minor neurological disorders. To an untrained observer, "it might look like somebody was thinking about something...maybe trying to remember something, or that they're having a very slight palsy." -Merlin Mann

4. While generally done as a solo dance, the Fishstick can be performed "alone, with a study partner, or while [...] waiting for something to finish cooking." -Merlin Mann

But of course, it's simplest just to show you the Fishstick in action. Here's a video of Adam Lisagor, one of its creators, performing the Fishstick in public (be aware that he's a master of the dance, so some moves are in fact visible to observers):

More Fishstick videos after the jump.

For you beginners, here's an instructional video explaining step-by-step how to do the Fishstick:

This Fishstick performance primarily involves blinking:

Ladies also do the Fishstick:

And this last one is particularly moving due to its extreme lack of movement:

Can you do the Fishstick? Check out some more awesome Fishsticks on Vimeo, and soon you too will be able to dance while barely moving.

Update: Fishstick co-creator Scott Simpson has published his Fishstick performance with a special "finishing move" as the music fades out. Apparently he also offers lessons.

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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iStock
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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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iStock

If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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