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The Face Bank

Creepy or cute? The Banpresto Face Bank will eat your coins and save them for you! The eyes are actually sensors. If they see a coin, the Face Bank's mouth starts to chew. 180NomNom.jpgI'm glad it doesn't salivate! This would be a fine incentive for children to save their coins, but not for very young children. After all, we try to tell them coins are dirty, and you shouldn't put them in your mouth. Plus I don't know what happens when someone sticks their finger in Face Bank's chewing mouth. OK, consider this scenario: You have to raise some funds for the local food bank or whatever. It would be well worth the investment to put one of these on a store counter, because people would fall all over themselves to donate pocket change. It would have to be emptied often, since the money tray is not large. Four AAA batteries required. Available in six colors from AudioCubes for $39.99 plus brick or mortar style from Strapya for 2,380 yen. And you'll love the attempt at English promo copy at Strapya. Watch the Face Bank in action.

If I could improve this product, I'd get rid of the servo motor sound and have it say "Om Nom Nom." Then it would end with a loud burp. Otherwise, I love it!

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Bone Broth 101
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Whether you drink it on its own or use it as stock, bone broth is the perfect recipe to master this winter. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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